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Author: Praed, John, fl. 1711.
Title: Varieties of villany as murther, maiming, theft, perjury upon perjury. And many other infamous matters, set forth at large, and published, in the case (with its proofs and evidences) of John Praed, respondent, to the appeal of VVilliam VVarre. VVhich came to a hearing at the bar of the House of Lords, on the 27th of January 1692/3, and went for the respondent nemisie contradicente.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Varieties of villany as murther, maiming, theft, perjury upon perjury. And many other infamous matters, set forth at large, and published, in the case (with its proofs and evidences) of John Praed, respondent, to the appeal of VVilliam VVarre. VVhich came to a hearing at the bar of the House of Lords, on the 27th of January 1692/3, and went for the respondent nemisie contradicente.
Praed, John, fl. 1711.

London: printed for Abel Roper in Fleetstreet, and S. Bristol in Covent-Garden, 1693.
Alternate titles: Caption title on p. 1:Case of John Praed respondent, to the petition and appeal of William Warre
Notes:
Cropped with some loss of print.
Reproduction of the original in the Cambridge University Library.
Subject terms:
Praed, John, -- fl. 1711 -- Early works to 1800.
Warre, William -- Early works to 1800.
Trials (Murder) -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Trials (Robbery) -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Trials (Perjury) -- England -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A55625.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE READER.
THE CASE OF JOHN PRAED Respondent, to the Petition and Appeal of WILLIAM WARRE.
Part of the Appellant's Case.
Part of Gate's his Commission to the Respondent.
Part of the Appellant's Commission.
Part of the Appellants Bill, against Gates, in the Exchequer.
Part of Gates his Answer to the aforesaid Bill.
Part of the Appellants Affidavit—
Part of the Deposition of Mr. Abraham Anselme, who was Partner with Mr. Williams at Venice.
A Letter Written by Mr. Williams to the Respondent.
Part of the Deposition of Captain Waters Commander of the African aforesaid
Parts of several Letters from Mr. Warre persuading me to come Home for several pretended reasons.
letter
letter
letter
letter
letter
letter
letter
Part of a Letter from Mr. Warre to Mr. Pendarves and my Self, being the last that he wrote us.
A Letter from Mr. Williams to Mr. Bonnells.
Part of an Intercepted Letter from Mr. Warre to Mr. Fran. Taverner.
Parts of two Letters from Mr. Gates to Mr. Pendarves and my Self.
letter
letter
Parts of some Letters from Mr. Pendarves to me.
Part of a Letter from Mr. Pendarves, sent by me to Mr. Warre.
Part of the Depositions of William Ceely Gent. and of Signieur Eliezer Trevese.
Signior Eliezer Trevese to the 3d, 4th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th Interrogatories, Deposeth as followeth, viz.
A Letter from Mr. Pendarves.
A Letter from Mr. Ceely.
A Letter from Sir John Buckworth to Sir Clement Harby, late Consul of Zant.
A Letter without Date from M. Simon Baxter, Mercha in London.
A Translation of the Petition for the Banishment of Mr. Pen∣darves, and my self, as it was Proved, and Read in the Court of Chancery.
Part of a Letter from Mr. Warre about the Ships Lading, for which the precedent Petition was preferr'd for our Banish∣ment.
Part of a Letter, from Signior Cosma, (a Cunning Zantiot) sent by me to his Quondam Friend, and great Acquaintance Mr. William Warre, when the said Mr. Warre Wrote to me to come to Venice, and from thence Home. I suspected the Im∣portance thereof, and found it was written by the Antiphrasis of his Fancy, to render my Condition ridiculous to him that made it so; and not according to the Pretensions of the Stile.
A Letter from Mr. Ceely.
The Conclusive Part of a Letter from Mr. Pendarves, writ∣ten a little before the Disuniting of The Union, and theOcto; Names well known upon the Exchange of London.