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Author: Poyntz, Robert, Sir, 1589?-1665.
Title: A vindication of monarchy and the government long established in the Church and Kingdome of England against the pernicious assertions and tumultuous practices of the innovators during the last Parliament in the reign of Charles the I / written by Sir Robert Poyntz, Knight of the Bath.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A vindication of monarchy and the government long established in the Church and Kingdome of England against the pernicious assertions and tumultuous practices of the innovators during the last Parliament in the reign of Charles the I / written by Sir Robert Poyntz, Knight of the Bath.
Poyntz, Robert, Sir, 1589?-1665.

London: Printed by Roger Norton and are to be sold by Gabriel Bedell, and Thomas Collins ..., 1661.
Notes:
"The contents" on p. [1]-[2] at end.
Running title: A vindication of monarchy, &c.
Reproduction of original in Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Great Britain -- History -- Charles II, 1660-1685.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A55606.0001.001

Contents
title page
A VINDICATION OF MONARCHY AND The Government long established in the Church and Kingdom of England, &c.
CHAP. I. Innovations in Government; Publishing of false Newes, and Prophesies; Pretenses of Reformation; Sects and Divisions in matters of Religion; Quarrel against Epis∣copacy.
CHAP. II. Of the Presbyterian Government in the Church; The pra∣ctice in the Primitive times; Touching the election of Pastors and Ministers in the Church, and their mainte∣nance by paiment of Tythes
CHAP. III. The inconveniences that happen by the alterations of Go∣vernment, in the Church and Common-wealth; Of Ce∣remonies used in the Church-Service; Of tender consci∣ences; Of the coercive power of the Magistrate in mat∣ters of Religion.
CHAP. IV. Of the changes in Religion in England; And by Luther; And the toleration of divers Religions.
CHAP. V. Of the use of Parliaments; Of the danger that cometh by the abuse of Parliaments; and the Factions that there∣in arise.
CHAP. VI. The Right that Bishops have to sit in Parliament.
CHAP. VII. The necessity of having all the Members present in Parlia∣ment, or the greater number of them, and the danger of Confederations, Associations, Ingagements, and other indirect practises, contrary to the Rights of the King, and the liberty of the Subject.
CHAP. VIII. Of Seditions, and seditious Assemblies, and the punish∣ment thereof; Of the power of the King, in that which concerneth the Militia, and the Arms of the Kingdome; And of other Rights of the Crown.
CHAP. IX. Of the Act of Parliament wherein the King was to pass a∣way his power in the Militia; And that other Act which was made for the continuation of the Parliament until both Houses should agree for the dissolving thereof. Of fraud or force used towards the King or any other men, for the obtaining of any Charters, Patens, or Grants.
CHAP. X. The Case of Subjects in Rebellion against their Soveraign, and the errour of those that would draw more crimes within the compass of Treason then they ought; Of Acts made and past under the power of a Usurper.
CHAP. XI. Against any power pretended to depose Princes; Of the Allegiance of the Subjects; Of the oath of the King; and of his Coronation: Of strangers joyning in Arms with subjects in Rebellion against their Soveraign; Of oathes and ingagements made to Tyrants and Ʋsurpers.
CHAP. XII. Of those who onely accept of Offices and Imployments under Tyrants and usurpers.
CHAP. XIII. Of the inseparable conjunction and relation between the King and his Subjects, which cannot be dissolved by any law or custome; That Kings cannot alienate their Kingdomes, nor Subjects renounce their allegeance, nor bar the next successour of the Crown.
CHAP. XIV. Of the Beginning and Continuation of Kingly Govern∣ment.
CHAP. XV. Of Prescription as well upon Land as Sea; And the Right and Jurisdiction that the King hath in the Sea, and over the Sea.
CHAP. XVI. Against the pretended Power of the people to Elect their prince, or to depose him; Of the Norman conquest of England, and of Leagues between Princes, and of Aides given to Subjects in Rebellion against their Soveraign.
CHAP. XVII. Of the King, and of his power in Parliament.
CHAP. XVIII. Of the Kings Prerogativ'.
CHAP. XIX. Of a Civil war, and of the effects thereof.
CHAP. XX. No pretences whatsoever can be just ground of a Civil War or Rebellion.
THE CONTENTS.