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Author: Pinder, Richard, d. 1695.
Title: The captive (that hath long been in captivity) visited with the day-spring from on high. Or the prisoner (that hath fitten in the prison-house of woful darkness) freed into the everlasting light and covenant of God, in which perfect peace and satisfaction is. Written by way of conference, and sent out into the world for the sake of those who have long groped upon the tops of the dark mountains, where the barrennesse and emptinesse is, without the knowledge of the true light to be their guide, that they (as in a glass) may see themselves, and read what hath been the cause why they have so long sought, and not found that they have sought for. Given forth especially for the sake of the scattered people in America, by one who labors for and waits to see the elect gathered from the four quarters of the earth, known by the name of Richard Pinder.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The captive (that hath long been in captivity) visited with the day-spring from on high. Or the prisoner (that hath fitten in the prison-house of woful darkness) freed into the everlasting light and covenant of God, in which perfect peace and satisfaction is. Written by way of conference, and sent out into the world for the sake of those who have long groped upon the tops of the dark mountains, where the barrennesse and emptinesse is, without the knowledge of the true light to be their guide, that they (as in a glass) may see themselves, and read what hath been the cause why they have so long sought, and not found that they have sought for. Given forth especially for the sake of the scattered people in America, by one who labors for and waits to see the elect gathered from the four quarters of the earth, known by the name of Richard Pinder.
Pinder, Richard, d. 1695.

London: printed for Thomas Simmons at the sign of the Bull and Mouth near Aldersgate, 1660.
Alternate titles: Captive (that hath long been in captivity) visited with the day-spring from on high Prisoner (that hath fitten in the prison-house of woful darkness) freed into the everlasting light anc covenant of God in which perfect peace and satisfaction is. Captive visited: &c.
Notes:
Title page is on A2; preliminary leaf lacking?.
Caption title on p. 7 reads: The captive visited: &c.
"Postscript" begins on p. 40.
Reproduction of the original in the Friends House Library, London.
Subject terms:
Covenant theology -- Early works to 1800.
Spiritual life -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A54907.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE READER.
THE CAPTIVE VISITED: &c.
Post-script.