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Author: Pennyman, John, 1628-1706.
Title: The Quakers unmasked their double-dealing and false-heartedness discovered by collections taken out of their own writings, which were communicated to G. Fox, G. Whitehead, and others of their preachers and leaders : wherein may be seen some of their contradictions thereupon by another hand : also, one of the forms of their oaths, used amongst themselves, with their definition of an oath : likewise a letter and paper formerly sent to the abovesaid G.F. : whereunto are annexed some remarks, &c. : also what an oath is : in a letter to E.S. ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The Quakers unmasked their double-dealing and false-heartedness discovered by collections taken out of their own writings, which were communicated to G. Fox, G. Whitehead, and others of their preachers and leaders : wherein may be seen some of their contradictions thereupon by another hand : also, one of the forms of their oaths, used amongst themselves, with their definition of an oath : likewise a letter and paper formerly sent to the abovesaid G.F. : whereunto are annexed some remarks, &c. : also what an oath is : in a letter to E.S. ...
Pennyman, John, 1628-1706., A. C.

London: Printed for J. Gwillim ... and R. Baldwin ..., 1691.
Notes:
Attributed by Wing and NUC pre-1956 imprints to Pennyman.
"The author ... to reader" signed: J.P. [i.e. John Pennyman]
Page 1-23 printed in parallel columns, the first, "Geo. Fox's judgment concerning kingly government ... before the king was restored", the other, "G. Fox his judgment concerning kingly government, since the king was restored."
"Some remarks upon a book entitled Christ's lambs defended against Satan's rage, &c. : being the Quakers answer to The Quakers unmask'd, &c. : in a letter to E.S. ..." signed: A.C. p. 1-6 at end.
Reproduction of original in the Harvard University Library.
Subject terms:
Fox, George, -- 1624-1691.
Whitehead, George, -- 1636?-1723.
Society of Friends -- Controversial literature.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A54263.0001.001

Contents
title page
The Author of the following Collections to the READER.
This following was writ by the Person that caused the 66 Books aforesaid, in Folio, to be printed.
To the Reader. The three following Letters were writ to Mr. J. O. The first was Printed the other not.
First Letter to Mr. J. O. sent with the following Book then not printed.
Second Letter to Mr. O.
But instead of returning the said Book, as I desired, he sent me part of a Letter writ to him by G. W. which occasioned me to write this following Answer.
The PREFACE
Geo, Fox's Judgment CONCERNING KINGLY GOVERNMENT.
Taken out of a Paper of his, written to the Presbyterians and Others, before the KING was Restored.
G. Fox to the Protector and Parliament. p. 62. 1658.
Again, A Word from the Lord, &c. p. 15, 1654. (he saith)
Of the Great Success that George For told Oliver he should have had, if he had been Faithful; in a Letter to him, Dated 11th. Month 1657. See Council and Advice, &c. p. 26, 27.
This following Letter shews that G. F. approved of Olivers Authori∣ty, about which he gives him and his Souldiers Charge, p. 36, 37.
In another Letter the same G. F. salutes Oliver thus, p. 27.
The same G. F. in the Name of the Church of Christ, and Elect Assembly,—Known in the Nations by the Name of Quakers, To Rich. Cromwel Protector, p. 47, 51.
But when Richard was gone off the Stage, and the Officers of the Army in Power, then G. F. applies himself to them in these words,
remarks
Now we are to see whether E. Burrough doth not Justifie the late War against the King. Counsel and Advice. Printed 1659.
In another Letter to him he writes thus, dated September 1657. Pag. 16, 17.
And in a Letter of his to the Protector and Council. 12th. Month, 57. he saith, p. 23.
In another Letter to the Protector, which was given to him the 6th. Month, 1658. about a Month before his Death, he writes thus, p. 33.
An Alarm sounded in the Pope's Borders. 1659 E. B's Works. p. 536.
The same E. Burrough to Rich. Cromwel chosen to be Protector, See Council and Advice, p. 53.
E. Burrough to the Protector's Kind ed, his Wife and Chil∣dren, p, 37, 38.
Now let us hear what Francis Howgil saith in Justification of the late War. See his Advice to the Army, Committee of Safe∣ty, &c. 1659. p. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7.
See also E. Burrough to the new Committee of Safety. 1659. to the same purpose concerning Deposing Governors. E. B's Works, p. 593.
Likewise see the Declaration of their Faith touching Governours, E. B's Works. p. 442. Printed 1672.
Now hear E. B's Advice to the Parliament of the Common∣wealth of England, &c. against Heriditary Government, 6th. October 1659. [But after K. C. 2. was restored, then they left all this Paper out in the Reprint of his Works:]
See moreover G. F's Paper (taken out of the same Book, that the Abstract against Kingly Government was taken) p. 42.
Hear now Is. Penington, an Eminent Writer among them, [and one of good repute,] to the Parliament, the Army, and all the well-affected in the Nation, who have been faithful to the Good Old Cause, 1659. p. 1.
Miles Halhead and T. S. two Eminent Men of their Ministry, follow with their most plain Testimony, Wounds of an Enemy, &c. 1656. p. 23.
Take also George Roffs Testimony, another of their Ministry.
Hear again E. Burrough and F. Howgil pleading the Quakers Faithfulness to the Common-Wealth's Interest, and bringing to Mind the utter Destruction of the Bishop's and King's Power, as of a stone sunk into the Sea, which riseth not again.
Again E. B. to the Heads,—Judges, &c. p. 19.
Let us now hear News out of the North, &c. A Book set out by G. F. and written (as he saith) from the Mouth of the Lord. 1655.
Again hear also what G. Fox and other Quakers tell us in the West answering to the North, Writ 1656 the next year after News out of the North, &c.
Now let us hear E. Burrough bemoaning Oliver after his Death. A Testimony against a great Idolatry. This also is owned by G. F. G. W. and their Party, and is to be read in his Works, 1672.
To all you who are and have been always Enemies to the very appea∣rance of Righteousness who are called Delinquents and Cavaliers.
And notwithstanding they in their Declaration given to the King, Jannuary 1660. Testifie that the Spirit of Christ which leads them into all Truth will never move them to Fight and War against any Man with Outward Weapons. Yet E. B. being moved of the Lord (as he saith) by his Spirit thereunto, gives forth thus, To the present distracted Nation of England, &c. 1659.
And having heard of their Preaching up Armies, Victo∣ries, Spoils, &c. Let us hear a little farther of G. F's ad∣vising the Parliament to Sequestrations, &c.
And in their Papers sent to the Parliament about Tythes, 1659. p. 65, 63.
G, Fox HIS JUDGMENT Concerning Kingly Government, since the King was Resto∣red. Declar. P. 3, 4.
G. F. G. W. and their Party's Declaration in the Year 1660. after the King came in, p. 2.
Again see the Qua∣kers Plea, 1661. How peaceable the Quakers are, and have always been p 7.
Hear farther what G. F. &c. say to the King and Council after the rising of the Fifth Monarchy Men, p. 2.
And notwithstanding all that E. B. and others have written in Justifi∣cation of the Parlia∣ment's Cause against the King, yet at the King's coming in, that is in the middle of May, 1660. then E. B. writes, (In his Book called, A Visitation, &c. p. 12.)
See their Paper to the King and Council 1660. p. 5.
See their Book, entitled, The Guide Mistaken, 1668. p. 50, 51, 52. They write thus,
See also their Book, entituled, A Just Rebuke to xxi Divines. p. 25.
G. Whitehead, I have lately seen your Book, entitled, The Way cast up &c. and therein these following Passages, viz.
Ʋnderstanding this Book was Printing, and the two Letters of my Name transposed, [which are now placedright,] I writ the following Paper, and ordered it to be inserted here. J. P.
Here followeth one of the Forms of their Oaths, which Stephen Crisy, one of their great Preachers, imposed upon one called a Quaker, who had Mortgag'd his Land to him and others for a Sum of Money; but before he would let him have the said Money (notwithstanding he had Signed and Sealed and Delivered according to their Agreement) he forced him (though with much dissatisfaction) to Sign and Seal this following; (which by their own Definition of an Oath, is an absolute Oath. Their Definition of an Oath is set down hereafter.)
Now see their Definition of an Oath in their Answer to one J. S. who asserted that to say, God is my Witness. I say the Truth in Christ, I lye not, my Conscience bearing me Witness in the Holy Ghost. I call God to Record on my Soul. The God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ knows that I lye not. And that Jacob and Laban are said to Swear in these Form of Words, So God is Witness between me and thee, were Oaths.
A Copy of a Letter and Paper (mention'd in the Title-page) sent to G. F. March 17. 1674/5.
Something of G. F's Deceit and Hypocrisie discovered.
For the Preachers and Leaders of the People, called, QUAKERS.
SOME REMARKS Upon a Book, entitled, Christ's Lambs defended against Satan's rage, &c. Being the Quakers Answer to The Quakers Vnmask'd, &c.
POSTSCRIPT.
Of the Nature of an Oath.
Farther see several Forms of an Oath. viz.
criticism