For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: Penington, Edward, 1667-1701.
Title: Some brief observations upon George Keith's earnest expostulation contained in a postscript to a late book of his, entituled, The antichrists and sadducees detected, &c. Offered to the perusal of such as the said expostulation was recommended to. By E. P.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further information or permissions.

Print source: Some brief observations upon George Keith's earnest expostulation contained in a postscript to a late book of his, entituled, The antichrists and sadducees detected, &c. Offered to the perusal of such as the said expostulation was recommended to. By E. P.
Penington, Edward, 1667-1701.

London: printed and sold by T. Sowle, in White-Hart-Court in Gracious-Street, 1696.
Notes:
Work signed at end: Edward Penington.
Reproduction of the original in the Friends House Library, London.
Subject terms:
Keith, George, -- 1639?-1716. -- Antichrists and sadducees detected -- Early works to 1800.
Quakers -- Controversial literature -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A54017.0001.001

Contents
title page
Some Brief Observations upon George Keith's Earnest Expostulation, &c.
I. His Representing the Quakers as worse than Papists.
II. His Reflections upon the Protestant Clergy as more lukewarm, if they oppose not the Quakers here, than the Popish Clergy at Rome would be in such a Case.
III. He Chargeable, while a Quaker, with what he Re∣flects upon the Quakers for, in relation to Disputes.
IV. His Itch to have you Dance after his Pipe, viz. Challenge Disputes with the Quakers.
V. His pretended tender Compassion to the Souls of People, highly insincere.
VI. The Irregularity of his Proposal of Disturbing our Meetings, contrary to Law.
VII. His Endeavours to excite the Civil Authority against us.
VIII. His high Opinion of himself, in setting up for Directer both of Church and State, in Methods to be used for the Preservation of the True Protestant Religion.
IX. His Malice against our Books.
X. The Case between our Books, and his Pennsilvania Books, as stated by him, far different.