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Author: Owen, David, d. 1623.
Title: A persvvassion to loyalty, or, The subject's dutie vvherein is proved that resisting or deposing of kings (under what spccious [sic] pretences soever couched) is utterly unlawfull / collected by D.O.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A persvvassion to loyalty, or, The subject's dutie vvherein is proved that resisting or deposing of kings (under what spccious [sic] pretences soever couched) is utterly unlawfull / collected by D.O.
Owen, David, d. 1623.

London printed: [s.n.], 1642.
Alternate titles: The power of princes and the duty of subjects
Notes:
A reprint of the original manuscript entitled: The power of princes and the duty of subjects. Cf. DNB.
Reproduction of original in Bristol Public Library.
Subject terms:
Prerogative, Royal -- England.
Great Britain -- History -- Charles I, 1625-1649.
Great Britain -- History -- Civil War, 1642-1649.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A53652.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the dutifull Subject.
The Table of the Book.
The first Chapter proveth by the test mony of Scripture, that Kings are not punishable by man, but reserved to the Judgement of GOD.
The second Chapter prooveth the same by the Fathers of the first 300 yeares.
The third Chapter prooveth by the Fathers of the second 300, years, that the pleasure of Princes must be endured with pa∣tience, when their decrees cannot be obeyed with a good Conscience.
The fourth Chapter proveth the Immunity of Kings by the Fathers of the third 300 yeares.
The fift Chapter confirmeth this Doctrine by the Fathers of the fourth 300 yeares.
The sixth Chapter proveth the same by the testimony of the Writers from the 1200 yeares downward.
The Seventh Chapter sheweth the concord of Papist and Puritan for the deposition of Kings, and their discord about the meanes and persons to be imployed in the execution of their Designements.
The eight Chapter sheweth the danger of this Doctrine, and the Originall of the Puritan position, concerning the power of statesmen to punish and depose Princes in Mo∣narchies.
The ninth Chapter sheweth the generall consent of the Modern Pu∣ritans touching the coercion, deposition, and killing of Kings, whom they call Tyrants.