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Author: Nichols, Charles, fl. 1651.
Title: The hue and cry after the priests who wander from benefice to benefice, directed to those who are neer neighbours to the great parsonages, where (if it be possible) they are to be found. It being an ansvver to the Ministers hue and cry; published by a devout clergy-man; R. Culmer. The dialogue explained, the priests dresse pulled off, the speakers, who in the parsons attireing-house were cloathed in a disguise; Mr. Culmers speakers. Paul Sheepheard. Barnaby Sheafe. ... Alias, Paul Sheep-biter; Barnaby Shift; ... hoping the hours approach wherein he shall no longer tythe. The imprimatur saith, let this hue and cry passe, follow it hast; post hast. Let it passe the parochiall, provinciall, classicall combination; but for all your haste, we must examine its warrant, least it be a false pretence, and not sealed with the royall signet of King Jesus. Published by the weakest and unworthiest of the labourers in Gods vine-yard. Charles Nichols.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The hue and cry after the priests who wander from benefice to benefice, directed to those who are neer neighbours to the great parsonages, where (if it be possible) they are to be found. It being an ansvver to the Ministers hue and cry; published by a devout clergy-man; R. Culmer. The dialogue explained, the priests dresse pulled off, the speakers, who in the parsons attireing-house were cloathed in a disguise; Mr. Culmers speakers. Paul Sheepheard. Barnaby Sheafe. ... Alias, Paul Sheep-biter; Barnaby Shift; ... hoping the hours approach wherein he shall no longer tythe. The imprimatur saith, let this hue and cry passe, follow it hast; post hast. Let it passe the parochiall, provinciall, classicall combination; but for all your haste, we must examine its warrant, least it be a false pretence, and not sealed with the royall signet of King Jesus. Published by the weakest and unworthiest of the labourers in Gods vine-yard. Charles Nichols.
Nichols, Charles, fl. 1651.

London: printed for Livewell Chapman, and are to be sold at his shop at the Crowne in Popes-Head-Alley, 1651.
Alternate titles: Rambling hue and cry coming lately to my hand, with this superscription next the imprimatur.
Notes:
Caption title on p. 1 reads: A rambling hue and cry coming lately to my hand, with this superscription next the imprimatur. Follow it hast, post hast.
A response to: Culmer, Richard. The ministers hue and cry.
Copy from Edinburgh University Library (UMI "Early English Books, 1641-1700") has final leaf mutilated at head with some loss of text.
Reproductions of the originals in the Edinburgh University Library and Dr. Williams' Library, London.
Subject terms:
Culmer, Richard, -- d. 1662. -- Ministers hue and cry -- Controversial literature -- Early works to 1800.
Tithes -- England -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A52297.0001.001

Contents
title page
A Rambling Hue and Cry coming lately to my hand, with this Superscription next the Imprimatur.