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Author: Malebranche, Nicolas, 1638-1715.
Title: Malebranch's Search after the truth, or, A treatise of the nature of the humane mind. Vol. II and of its management, for avoiding error in the sciences : to which is added, the authors defence against the accusations of Monsieur de la Ville : also, the life of Father Malebranch, of the oratory of Paris, with an account of his works, and several particulars of his controversie with Monsieur Arnaud Dr. of Sorbonne, and Monsieur Regis, professor in philosophy at Paris, written by Monsieur Le Vasseur, lately come over from Paris / done out of French from the last edition.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Malebranch's Search after the truth, or, A treatise of the nature of the humane mind. Vol. II and of its management, for avoiding error in the sciences : to which is added, the authors defence against the accusations of Monsieur de la Ville : also, the life of Father Malebranch, of the oratory of Paris, with an account of his works, and several particulars of his controversie with Monsieur Arnaud Dr. of Sorbonne, and Monsieur Regis, professor in philosophy at Paris, written by Monsieur Le Vasseur, lately come over from Paris / done out of French from the last edition.
Malebranche, Nicolas, 1638-1715., Sault, Richard, d. 1702.

London: Printed for S. Manship ..., 1695.
Alternate titles: Recherche de la vérité. English
Notes:
Translation of author's Recherche de la vérité, first published in French in 1694.
Special t.p.: A defence of the author of Search after truth.
Translator's dedication signed: Richard Sault.
Advertisement: p. [1]-[3] at end.
Numerous errors in paging.
Imperfect: print show-through.
Reproduction of original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
Arnauld, Antoine, -- 1612-1694.
Regis, Pierre Sylvain, -- 1632-1707.
Knowledge, Theory of.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A51660.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE Marquess of Normanby.
The Life of Father Malebranch of the Oratory at Paris: With an Account of his Works; and several Parti∣culars of his Controversie with Monsieur Arnaud Dr. of Sorbonne, and Monsieur Regis Professor in Philo∣sophy at Paris. Written by Mon∣sieur Le Vasseur, lately come over from Paris. Done into English by R. S.
A SEARCH AFTER TRUTH.
BOOK V. of the Passions.
CHAP. I. Of the Nature and Original of the Passions in general.
CHAP. II. Of the Ʋnion of the Mind with Sensible Things, or of the power or extension of the Passions in General.
CHAP. III. A particular Explanation of all the changes that happen to the Body and Soul by means of the Passions.
CHAP. IV. That the Pleasures and Motions of the Passions engage us in Errors, at the sight of Good; and therefore we ought continually to resist them. With the manner how to oppose Libertinism.
CHAP. V. That the Perfection of the Mind consists in its Ʋnion with God, by the knowledge of Truth and love of Vir∣tue; And that on the contrary, its Imperfection pro∣ceeds only from its dependance on the Body, because of the disorder of its Senses and Passions.
CHAP. VI. Of the most general Errors of the Passions. Some parti∣cular Examples of them.
CHAP. VII. Of the Passions in particular, and first of Admiration and its ill Effects.
CHAP. VIII. A Continuation of the same Subject; of the good Ʋse that may be made of Admiration, and the rest of the Passions.
CHAP. IX. of Love and Aversion, and of their principal kinds.
CHAP. X. Of the Passions in particular, the manner of explain∣ing them in general, and of discovering the Errors of which they are the cause.
CHAP. XI. How all the Passions justifie themselves, and of the judg∣ments they cause us to make in their vindication.
CHAP. XII. That such Passions, as have Evil for their Object, are most dangerous and unjust; and such as are attended with the least knowledge, are the most lively and sensible.
A SEARCH AFTER TRUTH.
CHAP. I. The Design of this Book, and the two general Means to preserve Evidence in an Enquiry after Truth, which will be the Subject of this Book.
CHAP. II. Attention is necessary to preserve Evidence in all our Perceptions, that the Modifications of the Soul make it attentive, but do much divide its Capa∣city of Perception.
CHAP. III. Of the use that may be made of the Passions and Senses, to preserve the Attention of the Mind.
CHAP. IV. Of the use that may be made of the Imagination, to preserve the Attention of the Mind, and of the Advantage of Geometry.
CHAP. V. Of the Means to increase the Extension and Ca∣pacity of the Mind. That Arithmetick and Algebra are absolutely necessary to this end.
PART II. Of Method.
CHAP. I. Of the Rules that must be observed in the Enquiry after Truth.
CHAP. II. Of the general Rule which concerns the Subject of our Studies. That the Philosophers have not ob∣served it, which has caused many Errors in Physicks.
CHAP. III. Of the most dangerous Error in Philosophy. Of the Ancients.
CHAP. IV. An Explanation of the Second Part of the general Rule. That Philosophers neglect it, but Mr. Des∣cartes has very exactly observed it.
CHAP. V. An Explanation of the Principles of the Aristote∣lian Philosophy, wherein it appears he never observed the Second Part of the General Rule. With an Examination of his Elementary Qua∣lities.
CHAP. VI. Some general Advices which are necessary to con∣duct us regularly in a Search after Truth, and in a Choice of the Sciences.
CHAP. VII. Of the Ʋse of the first Rule which respects Parti∣cular Questions.
CHAP. VIII. An Application of the other Rules to particular Questions.
CHAP. IX. The last Example to shew the Ʋsefulness of this Work, in which the Cause of the Ʋnion of the Parts of Bodies, and also the Rules of the Com∣munication of Motion, are examined.
THE CONCLUSION OF THE Three Last Books.
A PREFACE TO THE EXPLANATIONS. Wherein is shown, what we ought to think of the different Judgments that are commonly given of Books which oppose Prejudices.
Advertisement.
SOME EXPLANATIONS OF THE Search after Truth.
The First Explanation of the First Chapter of the First Book.
THE SECOND EXPLANATION OF THE First Chapter of the First Book.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE THIRD CHAPTER.
AN EXPLANATION OF These Words of the First Chapter.
AN EXPLANATION OF The Fifth Chapter.
AN EXPLANATION OF What I have said at the beginning of the 10th Chapter of the First Book, and in the 6th of the Second Book, of Method: That it is very difficult to prove that there are Bodies. Which must be understood of the the Proofs that are alledged of their Existence.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Fifth Chapter of the Second Book. Of Memory, and Spiritual Habits.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Seventh Chapter of the Second Book.
OBJECTIONS Against the Proofs and Ex∣planations of Original Sin.
Objection against the First Article.
The Second Objection against the First Article.
Objection against the Second Article.
Objection against the Fourth Article.
Second Objection against the Fourth Article.
Objection against the Fifth Article.
Objection against the Sixth Article.
Objection against the Seventh Article.
Objection against the Eleventh and Twelfth Articles.
Second Objection. Against the Eleventh and Twelfth Article.
OBJECTION. Against the Twelfth Article.
Second Objection. Against the Twelfth Article.
OBJECTION: Against the Seventeenth Article, and the following ones.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Third Chapter, of the Third Part, of the Second Book.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Nature of IDEAS.
Against what has been said, That God only Inlightens us, and that we see all things in Him.
FIRST OBJECTION.
SECOND OBJECTION.
THIRD OBJECTION.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Seventh Chapter of the Second Part of the Third Book.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Eighth Chapter of the Second Part of the Third Book.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Conclusion of the Three First BOOKS.
AN EXPLANATION OF THE Third Chapter of the Fifth Book.
A N EXPLANATION OF THE Third Chapter of the Second Part of the Sixth Book.
The first Proof.
The Second Proof.
The Third Proof.
The Fourth Proof.
The Fifth Proof.
The Sixth Proof.
The Seventh Proof.
AN EXPLANATION Of what I have said in the Fourth Chapter of the Second Part, Of Method; and else∣where.
title page
A DEFENCE OF THE AUTHOR OF THE Search after Truth: Against the ACCUSATION OF Monsieur de la Ville.
The First Proof.
The First Consequence contrary to Faith: That God is unjust.
Second Consequence repugnant to Faith: That God Wills Disorder, and that Nature is not Corrupted.
The Third Consequence contrary to Faith: The Soul of Man is Mortal; or at least, the Souls of Beasts pass from one Body to another.
The Second Proof.
A Consequence impugning the First Prin∣ciple of Morality; by which we are ob∣liged to love God with all our Power, and to fear him only.
The Third Proof.
The Consequence of a Principle proposed by Monsieur de la Ville, as matter of Faith, That the Essence of Bodies consists not in Extension. This Ne∣gative Principle overthrows the only demonstrable and direct Proof, of the Souls being a substance distinct from the Body, and consequently Immortal.
Books Printed for S. Manship, at the Ship near the Royal Exchange in Cornhil.