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Author: Murrell, John, 17th century.
Title: Murrels tvvo books of cookerie and carving.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Murrels tvvo books of cookerie and carving.
Murrell, John, 17th century., Murell, John, 17th century., Murrell, John, 17th century., Murrell, John, 17th century.

London: printed by M. F[lesher] for Iohn Marriot, and are to be sold at his shop in St Dunstans Churchyard in Fleetstreet, 1641.
Alternate titles: Murrels two books of cookerie and carving. Murrels two books of cookerie and carving. Two books of cookerie and carving. Second book of cookerie.
Notes:
Printer's name from STC.
A2r is a separate title page, without imprint, reading: A nevv book of cookerie. Wherein is set forth a most perfect direction to furnish an extraordinary, or ordinary feast either in summer or winter. ..
F5r is a separate title page, with imprint: Printed for Iohn Marriot .. 1641. Title page reads: The second book of cookerie. VVherein is set forth the newest and most commendable fashion of dressing, boyling, sowcing, or roasting, all manner either flesh, fish, or any kinde of fowle. ..
K6r is a separate title page, with same imprint as the general title page, reading: A nevv book of carving and sevving [sic].
Reproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Cookery -- England -- Early works to 1800.
Cookery (Meat) -- Early works to 1800.
Carving (Meat, etc.) -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A51636.0001.001

Contents
title page
list of illustrations
title page
TO THE VERTVOVS and well accomplished Gentlewoman Mris Martha Hayes (Daughter to the honora∣ble Sr Thomas Hayes Knight, late Lord Maior of the City of London:) health and hap∣pinesse.
The first Booke of Cookery.
A Bill of service for an extraordinary Feast for Summer season, 50. dishes to a Messe.
A Table of Direction for a Bill of fare for fish-daies, and Fasting dayes, Ember-weekes, or Lent.
boiled meats
To boyle a Capon Larded with Lemmons, on the French fashion.
To sowce a Pigge.
To sowce Oysters.
To sowce Pike, Carpe, or me.
To boyle Flounders or Gudgeons on the French fashion.
To boyle a Gurnet on the French fashion.
To boyle a Legge of Mutton on the French fashion.
To hash a Legge of Mutton on the French fashion.
To roast a legge of Mutton, on the French fashion.
To roast a Neates tongue, on the French fashion.
To boyle Pigeons with Rice on the French fashion.
To boyle a Rabbet with Hearbs on the French fashion.
To boyle Chickens in white broth.
To boyle a Teale or Wigeon on the French fashion.
To smoore an old Coney Ducke, or Mallard on the French fashion.
Another way to boyle Chickens, or Pigeons with Gooseberryes or Grapes.
To boyle a Chine of Mutton or Veale, in sharp broth, on the French fashion.
To boyle Larks or Spar∣rowes.
Baked-meates.
A made dish of Coney Livers.
A made dish of Sweet-bread.
A made dish of Sheepes tongues.
A Florentine of a Cony, the wing of a Capon, or the Kidney of Veale.
A Fridayes Pye, without either Flesh or Fish.
A Chewet of Stockfish.
A Quarter-Tart of Pippins.
A Gooseberry Tart.
A Cherry Pye.
To make an Oyster Pye.
A made dish of Musckels and Cockles.
To bake Neates tongues to be eaten hot.
A delicate Chewet.
To make an Umble Pye, or for want of Umbles to doe it with a Lambes head and Purtnance.
To bake a Calves Chaldron.
To bake a Carpe.
To bake a Tench with a Pudding in her belly.
To bake Eeles.
To bake Chickens with Grapes.
To bake a Steake pye with a French pudding in the pye.
To make a good Quince Pye.
To make a Pippin Pye.
To bake a Pigge.
To bake Fallow Deer in the best manner.
To bake a Red Deere.
To bake a wilde Boare.
To bake a Swan.
To bake a Turkey or a Capon.
To bake a Hare on the French fashion.
To bake a wild Goose or Mallard.
To bake a Curlew or Hearneshaw.
To bake Woodcocks, or Black-birds.
To bake Larkes or Sparrowes.
Fritters on the Court-fashion.
To make Pancakes so crispe, that you may set them upright.
A Sallet of Rose-buds and Cloue Gillyflowers.
To keepe green Cucumbers all the yeare.
To keepe Broome Capers.
Purslaine stalkes.
To make Caper-rowlers of Radish cods.
Divers Sallets boyled.
Buds of Hoppes.
A Sallet of Mallowes.
A Sallet of Burdock rootes.
To make blancht Manchet in a Fryingpan.
Puddings.
A fierced Pudding.
A pudding of Veale.
A Fregesey of Egges.
A Cambridg Pudding.
A Swan or Goose Pudding.
A Liveridge or Hogges Pudding.
A Chiveridge pudding.
A Ryce pudding.
A Florentine of Veale.
A marrow toast.
Another in a Frying-pan.
A Pudding stewed between two Dishes.
To make French puffes with greene Hearbes.
Dropt Raisins.
A Fond pudding.
To make puffes on the English fashion.
To make a Pudding in a Frying-panne.
To make Apple-puffes.
To make Kick-shawes.
To make some Kick-shawes in paste, to fry or bake, in what forme you please.
To make an Italian pudding.
To boyle a Racke of Veale on the French fashion.
To fearce a Legge of Lamb on the French fashion.
To hash Deere; Sheepe, or Calves tongues, on the French fashion.
English Cookery.
To boyle a Capon.
To garnish your Dishes.
To boyle a Capon anoher way.
To boyle a Capon in Rice.
To boyle a Capon with Oysters and picked Lemmons.
To boyle a Capon with Pippins.
To boyle Chickens in White∣broth.
To boyle Chickens in soope.
To boyle the common way.
To boyle Chickens with Lettice the best way.
To boyle a Rabbet.
To boyle a Rabbet with Grapes or Gooseberries.
To boyle a Rabbet with Claret-wine.
To boyle a wilde Duck.
To boyle a tame-Duck, or Widgin.
To boyle Pigeons.
To boyle Pigeons with Capers or Sampyre.
To boyle Saweeges.
To boyle Goose-Giblets, or Swannes giblets.
Giblets with Hearbs and Rootes.
To smoore a Racke or Ribbes of Mutton.
For the fillets of a Veale, smoored in a Frying-panne.
A Dish of Steakes of Mutton, smoored in a Frying-panne.
To smoore a Chicken.
To fry Mussels, Perywinckles, or Oysters, to serve with a Duck, or single by themselves.
To marble Smelts, Soales, Flounders, Plaice, &c.
To congar Eeles in Colar like Brawne.
To sowce a Pigge in collars.
To sowce a Breast of Veal.
To hast a shoulder of Mutton or a Legge of Lambe.
A Legge of Lambe fearst with Hearbes.
To smoore Calves feet.
Another way.
To hast Neates tongues.
The same with Chestnuts.
Certaine Gellies.
Christall Gelly.
To make Gelly of Pippins, of the co∣lour of Amber.
To make Gelly of Pippins, as orient red as Rubie.
To make white Leach of Almonds.
title page
To the Right worshipfull the Lady Browne, Wife to the right Worshipfull Sr Iohn Brown, Knight, health and happinesse.
THE SECOND Booke of Cookery.
To boyle a Capon larded with Lem∣mons on the French fashion.
To boyle Chickens.
Another way to boyle Chickens, or a Capon in white-broth.
Another way to boyle Chickens, for one that is sicke, and to pro∣voke sleepe.
Another way to boyle them on Sorrell∣sops, for him that hath a weake stomacke.
To boyle Partridges.
To boyle a Legge of Mutton on the French fashion.
To farce a Legge of Mutton.
To farce a Legge of Lambe.
To stew Trouts.
To make a farst Pudding.
To boyle a Pike.
To farce a Legge of Mutton on the French fashion.
To boyle a Carpe or a Breame.
To boyle a wild-Ducke, Widgin, or a Teale, on the French fashion.
Another way to boyle small Carpes or Breames.
Another way to boyle a Legge of Mutton or Lambe.
To boyle Eeles.
To boyle a Rabbet.
To boyle Lamprels.
To boyle a Necke, or a Loine, or a Chine of Mutton, or to boyle a Necke, or Legge, a Fillet, or a Knuckle of Veale, or to boyle a Legge, or Loine of Lambe.
To stew Smelts or Flounders.
To boyle Pigeons on the French fashion.
Another way to boyle a Pike.
To boyle Olives of Veale.
To boyle a Mullet, or a Pike with Oysters.
To boyle a tame Ducke.
To boyle a rashar of Mutton, or of cold Lambe.
To boyle a Knuckle of Veale, or a necke of Mutton.
To stew the ribs of a necke of Veale in steakes.
Bakte Meates, and Kick∣shawes.
To make a grand Sallet.
To sowce a Pigge.
To make Puspaste.
To roast a Legge of Mutton, or a Cowes Udder.
To make an Olive Pie to be eaten hot.
To roast a shoulder of Mutton to serve for either Dinner or Supper.
To bake a Chicken Pie to be eaten hot.
To roast a Neates tongue to be eaten hot.
To bake a Neates Tongue to be eaten hot.
To roast a Pigge with a Pudding in his belly.
To bake a Pigge to be eaten hot.
Another way to roast a Legge of Mutton.
To bake a steake Pie of the ribs of Mutton, to be eaten hot.
To roast a Neck of Mutton.
To make a Hartichoake-Pie to be eaten hot.
To roast a Shoulder, or Hanch of Venison, or a Chine of Mutton.
To make Chewets of Veale.
To roast a Capon with Oysters, and Chestnuts.
To bake a Quince or a Warden Pie, so as the fruit may be red, and the crust pale and tender.
To roast a Shoulder or a Fillet of Veale with farcing hearbes.
To fry Calves feet, or Trotters.
Buttred Loaves.
To fry sheepes tongues, Deeres tongues, or Calves tongues.
Boyled Sallets.
A bakte Pudding after the Italian fashion.
To make Puffes.
Blancht Manchet, to be made in a Frying-pan.
To make Peascods, or Dolphins of Marrow, or of a roasted kid∣ney of Veale.
To make a Livery Pudding.
To make Rice Puddings.
title page
Tearmes of a Carver.
The office of the Butler and Pantler, Yeoman of the Cellar and Ewry.
Of the Sewing of Flesh.
Service.
Of the Carving of flesh.
Service.
Sawces for all manner of Fowles.
Of the Feasts and service from Easter unto Whitsontide.
A generall Table of direction for the order of Carving up of Fowle, to direct them which know not, and are wil∣ling to learne.
Lift that Swan.
Reare the Goose.
To cut up a Turkey or Bustard.
Dismember that Herne.
Vnbrace the Mallard.
Vnlace that Conny.
Of the Carving of all manner of Fowles.
Sawce that Capon.
Allay that Fesant.
Wing that Partridge.
Wing that Quaile.
Display that Crane.
Dismember that Heron.
Vnjoynt that Bitturne.
Breake that Egript.
Vntach that Curlew.
Vntach that Brew.
Vnlace that Conny.
Breake that Sarcell.
Mince that Plover.
A Snite.
Thie that Woodcock.
From the Feast of Whitsontide unto Midsummer.
From the Feast of Saint John the Baptist unto Michaelmas.
From the Feast of Saint Michaell unto the Feast of Christmas.
The second Part of the Sewing of Fish.
The first course.
The second course.
The third course.
Of the Carving of Fish.
Of the sawces of all Fish.
The Chamberlaines Office.
Of the knowledge which is required of the Marshall and the Vsher.
A true and approved Receit, for the right making of the best Ipocras.
An excellent and much approved receit, for a long Consumption.
A Table of the first book.
A Table of the second book.
A Table to the Booke of Carving, and Sewing.
illustration
illustration