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Author: Mace, Thomas, d. 1709?
Title: Profit, conveniency, and pleasure, to the whole nation being a short rational discourse, lately presented to His Majesty, concerning the high-ways of England : their badness, the causes thereof, the reasons of those causes, the impossibility of ever having them well-mended according to the old way of mending, but may most certainly be done, and for ever so maintained (according to this new way) substantially, and with very much ease : and so that in the very depth of winter there shall not be much dirt, no deep-cart-rutts, or high-ridges, no holes, or vneven places, nor so much as a loose stone (the very worst of evils both to man and horse) in any of the horse-tracts, nor shall any person have cause to be once put out of his way in any hundred of miles riding.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Profit, conveniency, and pleasure, to the whole nation being a short rational discourse, lately presented to His Majesty, concerning the high-ways of England : their badness, the causes thereof, the reasons of those causes, the impossibility of ever having them well-mended according to the old way of mending, but may most certainly be done, and for ever so maintained (according to this new way) substantially, and with very much ease : and so that in the very depth of winter there shall not be much dirt, no deep-cart-rutts, or high-ridges, no holes, or vneven places, nor so much as a loose stone (the very worst of evils both to man and horse) in any of the horse-tracts, nor shall any person have cause to be once put out of his way in any hundred of miles riding.
Mace, Thomas, d. 1709?

[London: s.n.], Printed for a publick good in the year 1675.
Notes:
Advertisement: p. 23.
"The preface to the king" signed: Thomas Mace.
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
Roads -- England.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A50205.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE PREFACE TO THE KING.
to the reader
text
The Order of the Work, In three CONSIDERATIONS.
The Order of the Law.
The manner and means by which This so needful and profitable Work may most certainly be effected, with much ease, and no great cost.
The certain way to keep and maintain the High-wayes firm and good for ever.
The Order of the Day-man, and his Constant Work.
The Conclusion and very Life of the Business.
AN Abbreviation of the WORK, Being an Encouragement thereunto.
A short glance of the Conveniences, Pro∣fits, and Pleasures of this Work, men∣tioning only some few.
AN ADVERTISEMENT.