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Author: Le Clerc, Jean, 1657-1736.
Title: Reflections upon what the works commonly call good-luck and ill-luck with regard to lotteries and of the good use which may be made of them / written originally in French by Monsieur Le Clerk, done into English.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, MI ; Oxford (UK) :: Text Creation Partnership,
2011-12 (EEBO-TCP Phase 2).
Availability:

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Print source: Reflections upon what the works commonly call good-luck and ill-luck with regard to lotteries and of the good use which may be made of them / written originally in French by Monsieur Le Clerk, done into English.
Le Clerc, Jean, 1657-1736.

London: Printed for Matth. Gillyflower ... Tim. Goodwin, Matth. Wooton, and B. Took, 1699.
Alternate titles: Reflexions sur ce que l'on appelle bonheur et malheur en matière de loteries et sur le bon usage qu'on en peut faire. English
Subject terms:
Lotteries.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A49906.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE PREFACE.
A TABLE OF THE CHAPTERS.
ERRATA.
REFLECTIONS UPON What the World Commonly call Good Luck and Ill Luck.
CHAP. I. The Occasion and Design of this little Tract. The Original of the Word Lot.
CHAP. II. The Different Significations, of which the Words Good Luck and III Luck are capable.
CHAP. III. That Destiny is not the Cause of Good Luck Ill Luck.
CHAP. IV. That the Terms Good or Ill Fortune frequently mean nothing, no more than Chance. What Sense this last Word is capable of.
CHAP. V. The Objections drawn from Lotteries, and all Games that depend upon Chance, answered; and shewed insufficient to denominate Men For∣tunate, or that any Persons have Good Luck constantly going along with them.
CHAP. VI. Why Good and Ill Destiny and Fortune, and some other such Terms, though they fignifie nothing real and positive, should yet continue so long in use. In what Sense the Words, Good and Ill Luck may be admitted.
CHAP. VII. That Mens Good and Bad Angel are not the Cause of their Good or Ill Luck, in Gaming and Lotteries.
CHAP. VIII. That God does not by any particular Determi∣nations of his Divine Will, ordain Good Luck to Some, and Ill Luck to Others, in cases of Play and Lotteries.
CHAP. IX. That Those, who believe God presides over Ca∣sual Events in so particular a manner, think of him as the Heathen did.
CHAP. X. That those Magistrates are not to blame, who have set up Lotteries for the Bene∣fit of the Poor. A Commendation of the Hollanders in general, and particularly, with regard to the Lotteries opened by Publick Order.
CHAP. XI. The Lawfulness of putting into Lotteries, provided it be not done upon a Principle of Covetousness. Directions how to judge of this.
CHAP. XII. A Digression concerning Liberality, wherein the Nature of this Virtue is described, and the Practice of it recommended.
CHAP. XIII. The Conclusion of this Discourse. Men's Ma∣nagement of themselves in the business of Re∣ligion compared with then's who put into Lot∣teries.
A Catalogue of Books.