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Author: La Serre, M. de (Jean-Puget), ca. 1600-1665.
Title: Ethice christiana, or, The school of wisdom wherein the grounds of moral philosophy are demonstrated to comply with the principles of Christian religion, by a mixt exercise of grace and vertu / written originally in French ... by M. De la Serre ; and done into English by J.A.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Ethice christiana, or, The school of wisdom wherein the grounds of moral philosophy are demonstrated to comply with the principles of Christian religion, by a mixt exercise of grace and vertu / written originally in French ... by M. De la Serre ; and done into English by J.A.
La Serre, M. de (Jean-Puget), ca. 1600-1665., Alardis, James.

London: Printed by D.M. for Henry Marsh, 1664.
Notes:
"Epistle dedicatory" signed: James Alardis.
Reproduction of original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Christian ethics.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A49605.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE Right Noble and Excellent PRINCE JAMES Duke of MONMOƲTH, &c. AND His most Illustrious Consort, ANNE, &c.
TO The Noble READER.
imprimatur
TO THE READER.
THE TABLE.
Books sold by Henry Marsh at the Princes Arms in Chancery-Lane.
Ethice Christiana, OR The Precepts of Christian Morals.
CHAP. I. That we ought to have God for the Object of all our actions.
CHAP. II. That in this Life we can find no true ease, but in peace of Conscience.
CHAP. III. That we ought to draw our con∣solation against the miseries which befall us, from the consideration of the Original whence they are derived.
CHAP. IV. That true glory doth only con∣sist in living vertuously.
CHAP. V. That Integrity and upright deal∣ing only, maketh a vertuous man.
CHAP. VI. That in what condition soever we be, we ought therein to seek for our Repose and Sal∣vation.
CHAP. VII. That he that knoweth how to live well, is the most learned man in the World.
CHAP. VIII. That Moderation in Riches, is more to be desired then Ex∣cess, because it is more pro∣fitable.
CHAP. IX. That our Salvation and Repose depend of the knowledg of our selves.
CHAP. X. That we ought to derive our Nobility from our selves, as well as from our Ance∣stors.
CHAP. XI. That we ought to be dis-engaged from all things; to the end, That we may live without disquiet, and die without sor∣row.
CHAP. XII. That the Good we do in this World, is of greater value than the Goods we possess in it.
CHAP. XIII. If we would leave the World chearfully, we must dis-en∣gage our selves from it, ere we leave it.
CHAP. XIV. That the World is a Theatre, where every man acteth his Part in Time, for an Eter∣nity.
CHAP. XV. That the Wise man waiteth for Death, without either wish∣ing or fearing it.