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Author: Lane, A. (Archibald)
Title: A key to the art of letters, or, English a learned language, full of art, elegancy and variety being an essay to enable both foreiners, and the English youth of either sex, to speak and write the English tongue well and learnedly, according to the exactest rules of grammar, after which they may attain to Latin, French, or any other forein language in a short time ... : with a preface shewing the necessity of a vernacular grammar ... / by A. Lane ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A key to the art of letters, or, English a learned language, full of art, elegancy and variety being an essay to enable both foreiners, and the English youth of either sex, to speak and write the English tongue well and learnedly, according to the exactest rules of grammar, after which they may attain to Latin, French, or any other forein language in a short time ... : with a preface shewing the necessity of a vernacular grammar ... / by A. Lane ...
Lane, A. (Archibald)

London: Printed for A. and J. Churchil ... and J. Wild ..., 1700.
Notes:
Errata: p. xx.
Reproduction of original in British Library.
Subject terms:
English language -- Grammar -- 1500-1799.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A49298.0001.001

Contents
title page
approbation
TO THE Most Illustrious PRINCE WILLIAM Duke of Glocester.
The PREFACE, Humbly submitted to the Learned Reader.
ERRATA.
A KEY TO THE Art of Letters.
Of the Letters.
Of the Formation of the Letters.
Of Syllables.
Of e Servile.
Of the Accent.
Of Words.
Of S Servile.
Of Number.
Of the Declining of a Noun.
Of the Genders of Nouns.
Of an Adjective.
Of Comparison.
Observations on some Adjectives.
Of Verbs.
Of the Conjugation of Verbs.
Of the Moods.
Of Tense or Time.
Of the Preter tense of a Verb.
Of the Participles.
Of the Substantive or Copula∣lative Verb am.
Of the Particles.
Of an Adverb.
Of a Preposition.
Of a Conjunction.
Of Abbreviatures.
Of Interjections.
Of Derivative Words.
Of Diminitive Nouns.
Of Abstract Nouns.
Of the Substantive of the Actor or Doer.
Of the Substantive of the Action.
Of Substantives that signify Office.
Of Substantive that signify Dominion.
Of Substantives that signify State or Condition.
Of Derivative Adjectives.
Of a Possessive Adjective.
Of a Material Adjective.
Of an Adjective of Fulness.
Of Adjectives of Emptiness.
Of Adjectives of Likeness.
Of Diminutive Adjectives.
Of Ordinal Adjectives.
Of Derivative Verbs.
Of Derivative Adverbs.
Of the inseparable Particles un, dis, and mis.
Of a SENTENCE.
Of the Syntax or Construction of words in a Sentence.
Of Apposition.
Of the Nominative of the Subject.
Of the Nominative of the Pre∣dicate.
Of the Vocative.
Of the Gentive of the Possessor.
The Genitive of the Object.
Of the Genitive of the greater Number.
The Genitive of the greater Quantity.
Of the Genitive of the Part or Property.
Of the Dative.
Of the Accusative of the Object.
Of the Ablative.
Of Passive Verbs and Participles.
Of Compound Sentences.
Of a Relative Sentence.
Of a Copulative Sentence.
Of a Declarative and Final Sentence.
Of a Continuative Sentence.
Of a Comparative Sentence.
Of an Interrogative Sentence.
Of a Disjunctive Sentence.
Of a Period.
Of the Figurative Construction of Words.
Of Transposition.
Of Suppression, call'd in Greek Ellipsis.
Of Substitution, called in Greek Enallage.
Of Zeugma.
Of a Solecism and Pleonasm.
Of the natural Order of words.
Of the Points, Pauses or Stops.
Of a Note of Interrogation. (?)
Of a Note of Admiration. (!)
Of a Parenthesis. ()