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Author: Reinking, Conradus.
Title: Politikos megas the grand politician, or, The secret art of state-policy discovered in evident demonstrations of unparalleled prudence, and confirmed with wonderful and successful adventures, stratagems and exploits of wisdom and subtility, both in peace and war, by the most remarkable witts of former ages : being a treatise both useful and necessary for all nobles, states-men, judges, lawyers, justices of peace, officers of wars, and all such as now are, or may happen to stand at the helm of publick affairs, whether in kingdom or commonwealth / written originally in Latin by Conradus Reinking, Chancellour ot His Electoral Highness the Duke of Brandenburg, and now done into English by a careful hand.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Politikos megas the grand politician, or, The secret art of state-policy discovered in evident demonstrations of unparalleled prudence, and confirmed with wonderful and successful adventures, stratagems and exploits of wisdom and subtility, both in peace and war, by the most remarkable witts of former ages : being a treatise both useful and necessary for all nobles, states-men, judges, lawyers, justices of peace, officers of wars, and all such as now are, or may happen to stand at the helm of publick affairs, whether in kingdom or commonwealth / written originally in Latin by Conradus Reinking, Chancellour ot His Electoral Highness the Duke of Brandenburg, and now done into English by a careful hand.
Reinking, Conradus., Ker, Patrick, fl. 1691.

London: Printed for Tho. Howkins ..., MDCXCI [1691]
Notes:
Dedication and translator's preface signed Pat. Ker.
Contains engraved portrait frontispiece.
"Licensed and entred according to order."
Imperfect: pages faded and torn with print show through and loss of print.
Reproduction of original in the Harvard University Library.
Subject terms:
Political science -- Early works to 1700.
Political ethics.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A47277.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
TO THE Right Honourable, THE E. of Nottingham, Principal Secretary of State, TO Their Present Majesties
THE TRANSLATOR TO THE READER.
THE Contents.
THE Grand Politician: OR, THE SECRET ART OF State-Policy DISCOVERED.
PROEME.
INTRIGUE 1. The Art of perswading things unknown.
INTRIGUE II. The Art of perswading that you know an∣other's Secrets.
INTRIGUE. III. The Art of obtaining what you desire from your Enemy.
INTRIGUE IV. The Art of obtaining what you desire without asking, but by giving occasion that it may be profer'd.
INTRIGUE. V. The Art of obtaining hard and Difficult things.
INTRIGUE. VI. How to disarm and weaken an Enemy.
INTRIGUE VII. How to dissemble.
INTRIGUE. VIII. How to Persuade and Dissuade
INTRIGUE IX. How to obtain what you Desire, without danger of losing the Favour of him whom you desire it of.
INTRIGUE. X. How to obtain what you Desire, when the Person whom you desire it of is alto∣gether averse.
INTRIGUE. XI. How to force a Confession from one who is obstinate.
INTRIGUE XII. How to force any thing from One, by that which he most hateth.
INTRIGUE XIII. How to search out another's Secrets.
INTRIGUE XIV. How to find out One's Secrets, by insinua∣ting with another, who is privy to them.
INTRIGUE. XV. How to induce One to confess all his Secret Faults.
INTRIGUE XVI. How to find out the Secrets of Drunken Men.
INTRIGUE XVII. How to find out the Secrets of Sober Men.
INTRIGUE XVIII. How One may know what Reputation he is of, and what is his Character in the Eyes of others.
INTRIGUE XIX. How one may find out the Judgment of others, in a Case that concerns him∣self.
INTRIGUE XX. How to know whether a suspected Person be Guilty or not.
INTRIGUE XXI. How to know Secrets from Nature and Custome.
INTRIGUE XXII. How to prevent and escape hidden Snares.
INTRIGUE XXIII. How to Answer difficult and dubious Que∣stions, without Danger.
INTRIGUE XXIV. How to shun an offensive Answer or Sentence.
INTRIGUE XXV. How to shun a difficult Sentence.
INTRIGUE XXVI. How to speak One's Mind freely, without danger.
INTRIGUE XXVII. How to speak what you please, without any danger.
INTRIGUE XXVIII. How to shun the Reproach of an unhappy Adventure.
INTRIGUE XXIX. How to speak that, which, in it self, is dangerous, without hurt.
INTRIGUE XXX. How to shun that which is hateful to One, by a Jest.
INTRIGUE XXXI. How to Reveal a Secret, without giving Offence to him that did reveal it.
INTRIGUE XXXII. How to reprove one without giving Offence.
INTRIGUE XXXIII. How to shun the Inconveniences of Jeers and Satyrs.
INTRIGUE XXXIV. How to induce a Prince to hear one Pati∣ently.
INTRIGUE XXXV. How one ought to behave himself, and what course he should take, when he is environ'd with Danger and Difficulties on all sides.
INTRIGUE XXXVI. How Princes may conceal their Hatred, and private Displeasure.
INTRIGUE XXXVII. How to Asswage the Insolencies of a Sedi∣tious City.
INTRIGUE XXXVIII. How to Abrogate Privileges.
INTRIGUE XXXIX. How a Prince may frustrate an Enemy, with whom he intendeth to Wage War.
INTRIGUE XL. How a weak Kingdom, or Commonwealth, may be delivered from the Power of a potent Enemy.
INTRIGUE XLI. How to molest Neighbouring Nations.
INTRIGUE XLII. How to Suppress those who are proud of their Honourable Titles and Dignities.
INTRIGUE XLIII. How to keep under Men of Ambitious and Aspiring Spirits.
INTRIGUE XLIV. How to Suppress Seditious Soldiers.
INTRIGUE XLV. How to Suppress Civil Seditions and Ʋproars.
INTRIGUE XLVI. How to know whether an Informer speaketh Truth, or not.
INTRIGUE XLVII. How one ought to behave himself, when he receiveth an Injury from a Person of Quality, that is far above him.
INTRIGUE XLVIII. How to shun the Envy of Courtiers.
INTRIGUE XLIX. How One ought to behave himself with of∣fended Princes and Peers.
INTRIGUE L. How to Suppress the Vices, and wrong Sen∣tences of Partial Judges.
INTRIGUE LI. How to suppress Luxury.
INTRIGUE LII. How to render populous Cities unfit for Se∣ditions and Insurrections, without loss or detriment.
INTRIGUE LIII. How to appease an incensed People.
INTRIGUE LIV. How to keep the Favour of new Subjects.
INTRIGUE LV. Why Merchandizing is forbidden to the Nobility.
INTRIGUE LVI. Cancerning the Instruments of Power.
INTRIGUE LVII. How States-Men ought to behave them∣selves, in assuming the Honour of Me∣morable Acts.
INTRIGUE LVIII. How to appease offended Princes.
INTRIGUE LIX. How to impose Taxes, without the offence, and grumbling of the Subject.
INTRIGUE LX. How to collect Taxes without offending the Subject.
INTRIGUE LXI. How Seditions are raised.
INTRIGUE LXII. How Rebels and Conspirators are kept close together, in one Body.
INTRIGUE LXIII. The Arts and Tricks of Tirants,
INTRIGUE LXIV. How to punish Seditious Peers.
INTRIGUE LXV. How to prevent Scarcety of Corn.
INTRIGUE LXVI. How to behave in time of Dearth.
INTRIGUE LXVII. How to preserve Corn.
INTRIGUE LXVIII. How a Prince may best confer Honours and Places.
INTRIGUE LXIX. How to keep what is Conquered by force of Arms.
INTRIGUE LXX. How to march an Army through a Foreign Countrey.
INTRIGUE LXXI. How a Prince should behave himself with a Contentions Neighbour more powerful than himself.
INTRIGUE LXXI. How weaker Persons may prolong Time in difficult Matters.
INTRIGUE LXXII. How to deny a thing without Offence.
INTRIGUE LXXIII. How to compose Seditions by Intercessors.
INTRIGUE LXXIV. How to Suppress Sedition by force.
INTRIGUE LXXV. How to Suppress Sedition by Force of Arms.
INTRIGUE LXXVIII. How to enter in Covenant.
How to keep up Favour and Authority at Court.
INTRIGUE LXXVIII. How a Prince that is at Peace, should be∣have, when his Neighbours are in War.
INTRIGUE LXXIX. How to confine great States-men.
INTRIGUE LXXX. How to Disband Souldiers.
INTRIGUE LXXXIV. How Minesters of State may avoid great Dangers.
INTRIGUE LXXXV. How to Aspire to Promotion.
INTRIGUE LXXXVI. How to delay an Inevitable War.
INTRIGUE LXXXVII. How to Govern New Provinces.
INTRIGUE LXXXVIII. How to establish and settle new Conquests.
INTRIGUE LXXXIX. How to Compose the Differences of the Nobility.
INTRIGUE XC. How one must behave that feareth a Repulse.
INTRIGUE XCI. What Policy must be used by a General.
INTRIGUE XCII. How to crush Reproachful Speeches.
INTRIGUE XCIII. How to obtain leave to depart from Court.
INTRIGUE XCIV. How to avoid Envy.
INTRIGUE XCV. How to share Dominions among Brothers.
INTRIGUE XCVI. How to observe the due Time of making Truce.
INTRIGUE XCVII. How to change Commanders of an Army.
INTRIGUE XCVIII. How to draw up an Army.
INTRIGUE XCIX. How Ambassadors and Mediators may pro∣cure Peace.
INTRIGUE C. How to Dissemble the Desire of Peace.
INTRIGUE CI. The Causes of Animosities and Insurrections.
INTRIGUE CII. What Cautions are to be used in proposing difficult Matters.
Books Printed for, and Sold by, Thomas Howkins, in George-Yard, in Lom∣bard-Street.