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Author: Laophilus Misotyrannus.
Title: Mene tekel, or, The downfal of tyranny a treatise wherein liberty and equity are vindicated, and tyranny condemned by the law of God and right reason, and the peoples power and duty to execute justice without and upon wicked governors, asserted / by Laophilus Misotyrannus.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Mene tekel, or, The downfal of tyranny a treatise wherein liberty and equity are vindicated, and tyranny condemned by the law of God and right reason, and the peoples power and duty to execute justice without and upon wicked governors, asserted / by Laophilus Misotyrannus.
Laophilus Misotyrannus.

[S.l.: s.n.], 1663.
Notes:
Attributed to "Laophilus Misotyrannus [i.e. Roger Jones]. Cf. Halkett & Laing (2nd ed.).
Reproduction of original in Union Theological Seminary Library, New York.
Subject terms:
Kings and rulers -- Biblical teaching.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A47071.0001.001

Contents
title page
treatise
CHAP. I. Containing a Scriptural Description of Magistracy; also shewing that it is an Ordinance of God, what kind of Ordinance, and in what respect it is an Ordinance of Man.
CHAP. II. Treating of the Ends for which this great Ordinance was instituted by God; that is, for his own Glory, and the Peoples good. Also shewing that these should be the Peoples ends in electing Governours, and Governours ends in accepting and executing their Office.
CHAP. III. Treating of the Call of Magistrates, both supream and subordinate; shew∣ing that both by the Laws of God and Nature, the right of making Gover∣nours is inherent in the People.
CHAP. IV. Treating of the Qualifications of Magistrates, evincing by the Light of Reason, Law of God, End of Government, and other Arguments, that the People are bound to chuse such as are endued with the Spirit of Go∣vernment, wise and faithful men, fearing God, and hating Covetous∣ness, to be Governours over them.
CHAP. V. Treating of the Magistrates relation, wherein is proved, both by Scri∣pture and Reason, that Magistrates from the highest to the lowest, are the Peoples Servants. Such Objections as may probably be made against that Assertion, answered, and a few Inferences deduced from it.
CHAP. VI. Treating of some general Duties which Magistrates are obliged to; 1. To Answer the End of Government; 2. Keep, and fill up their Relation; 3. Observe the Law of God themselves; 4. Exercise Justice; 5. and protect the Land.
CHAP. VII. Treating of the Power which the Magistrate is to be entrusted withall; shewing that he is to have so much Power as is adequate to the end of Government, relation of a publick Servant, and duties of his place; and that he hath no right to any Power contrary to that.
CHAP. VIII.
CHAP. IX. Treating of the Honour which is due to the Magistrate.
CHAP. X. Treating of the Obedience due to the Magistrate.