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Author: Howell, William, 1631 or 2-1683.
Title: An institution of general history from the beginning of the vvorld to the monarchy of Constantine the Great : composed in such method and manner as never yet was extant / by William Howel ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: An institution of general history from the beginning of the vvorld to the monarchy of Constantine the Great : composed in such method and manner as never yet was extant / by William Howel ...
Howell, William, 1631 or 2-1683.

London: Printed for Henry Herringman, 1661.
Notes:
Includes bibliographical references.
Errata: p. [1] at end.
Advertisement: p. [2]-[3] at end.
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
World history -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A44772.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the KINGS most Excellent and most sacred MAJESTY.
PREFACE.
AN INSTITUTION OF Generall History. The First Part. BOOK I.
CHAP. I. From the beginning of the world, to the beginning of the first Empire.
CHAP. II. Of the Babylonian Empire, from the first founding thereof to it's utter subversion by Cyrus.
CHAP. III. Of Sacred History. Contemporaries with the Babylonian Empire.
SECT. I. From the time of Phaleg, and the division of the Earth; to the departure of the Israelites out of Aegypt.
SECT. II. From the departure of the Israelites out of Aegypt, to the death of So∣lomon, and the Rent of the Kingdom.
SECT. III. From the death of Solomon and the rent of the Kingdom, to the de∣struction of the Kingdom of Judah.
SECT. IV. The Kingdom of Israel From the revolt of the Tribes, to their final Captivity under Salmanasser.
CHAP. IV. The most ancient Kingdom of Egypt, Contemporary with the Babylonian Empire.
CHAP. V. The most Ancient state, and condition of Greece, during the Baby∣lonian Empire, with a Description of its Kingdoms and Common-wealth.
SECT. I. The State of Greece in General.
SECT. II. The Sicyonian Kingdom.
SECT. III. The Kingdom of Argos.
SECT. IV. The most antient Kingdom and Common-wealth of Athens.
SECT. V. The most antient Kingdom and Commonwealth of Lacedaemon.
SECT. VI. The most antient Kingdom of Corinth.
SECT. VII. The antient Kingdom of Thebes.
CHAP. VI. The Original, and Kingdom of Rome, Contemporary with the Babylonian Empire.
SECT. I. The Original of the Citie of Rome.
SECT. II. From the building of the Citie to the destruction of the Kingdom, the space of 245 years.
AN INSTITUTION OF General History. The First Part. BOOK II. Of the Persian Empire, and the Affairs of the World Contemporary with it.
CHAP. I. The Persian Empire.
SECT. I. From the beginning of the Empire of Cyrus, to the death of Cam∣byses his Son and Successor.
SECT. II. From the death of Cambyses to that of Xerxes.
SECT. III. From the death of Xerxes, and the beginning of Artaxerxes Longima∣nus, to the death of Artaxerxes Mnemon, containing the space of 103 years.
SECT. IV. From the death of Artaxerxes Mnemon, and the beginning of Ochus, to the death of Darius Codomannus, containing the space of 32 years.
Contemporaries with the Persian Empire.
SECT. I. Of such things as hapned from the beginning thereof until the Expedi∣tion of Xerxes.
SECT. II. Of such things as fell out amongst the Graecians, from their Victories at Plataea and Mycale, until the beginning of the Peloponnesian War, containing the space of 48 years.
SECT. III. From the beginning of the Peloponnesian War to the ending thereof, containing the space of 27 years.
SECT. IV. From the end of the Peloponnesian War to the beginning of the reign of Philip King of Macedonia, containing the space of 44 years.
SECT. V. From the beginning of the reign of Philip King of Macedonia, to the Monarchy of Alexander his Son, containing the space of 31 years.
CHAP. III. The affairs of Sicilie during this Empire.
SECT. I. The first Names and Inhabitants of this Island, with a relation of such things as preceded the Persian Empire.
SECT. II. Of such thing as were Contemporary with the Persian Empire.
CHAP. IV. The affairs of the Romans contem∣porary with the second Empire.
SECT. I. From the Banishment of Tarquinius and first change of the Government, to the alteration made by the Decemvivi, the space of 57 years.
SECT. II. From the Creation of the Decemviri to the War of Privernae, which fell out the same year that Darius Codomannus died: the space of 121 years.
AN INSTITUTION OF General History. The First Part. BOOK III. Of the Empire of the Macedonians, and Affairs of the World Contempora∣ry with it.
CHAP. I. From the beginning of the Monarchy of Alexander to his death, containing the space of six years and ten moneths.
CHAP. II. Of such things as hapned after the death of Alexander amongst his Captains, till their Cantonizing of his Empire into their par∣ticular Kingdoms, and their taking the Stile and Title of Kings upon them, containing the space of 17 years.
CHAP. III. From Alexanders Captains taking the Title of Kings, to the death of Seleucus the Surviver of them, containing the space of 24 years.
CHAP. IV. The Macedonian Kingdom. From the death of Seleucus to the Captivity of Perseus, and the end of this Kingdom, containing the space of 139 years.
CHAP. V. The Asian and Syrian Kingdom.
CHAP. VI. The Aegyptian Kingdom.
Contemporaries with the Empire of the Macedonians.
CHAP. VIII. The affaires of Sicilie Contemporary with the Empire of the Macedonians.
CHAP. IX. The affaires of the Romans Contem∣porary with the Empire of the Macedonians.
SECT. I. From the War of Privernum to the first Punick War, wherein the Romans first set foot out of Italy, the space of 66 years.
SECT. II. From the First Punick War, to that with Antiochus the Great, in which the Romans first invaded Asia, the space of 37 years.
SECT. III. From the War with Antiochus, and the invasion of Asia, to the destruction of Carthage, after which the Romans dege∣nerated through security, the space of 45 years.
SECT. IV. From the destruction of Carthage to the War with Mithridates King of Pontus, which afforded the occasion to the first Civil War, the space of 58 years.
SECT. V. From the War with Mithridates, and first Civil War, to the combina∣nation of Pompey, Crassus, and Caesar, termed by Varro Tricipitina, which proved the ruin of the Po∣pular Government, for the space for 28 years.
SECT. VI. From the beginning of the Tricipitina or first Triumvirate, to the absolutenesse of Julius Caesar, containing the space of sixteen years.
SECT. VII. From the absolutenesse of Julius Caesar, to the end of the second Triumvirate, and the absolutenesse of Octavius Caesar, or Caesar Octavianus, the space of 15 years.
AN INSTITUTION OF General History. The First Part. BOOK IV. The Roman Empire.
CHAP. I. From the absolutenesse of Octavius, to the death of Tiberius, containing the space of 66 years.
CHAP. II. From the death of Tiberius to that of Nero, the last Emperour of Caesar's family, containing the space of 20 years.
CHAP. III. From the death of Nero to that of Domitian, the last of the fa∣mily of Vespasian, the space of 27 years.
CHAP. IV. From the death of Domitian to that of Pertinax, and the exposing of the Empire to publick sale by the Soldiers, the space of 97 years.
CHAP. V. From the death of Pertinax, and the exposing of the Empire to sale, to the death of Maximinus the first elected Emperour without consent of the Senate, the space of 45 years.
CHAP. VI. From the death of Maximinus the first created Emperour without consent of the Senate, to the Monarchy of Constantine the first Christian Emperour, who reformed Religion, and translated the Imperial seat to Byzantium, the space of 86 years.
poem
errata
Books printed for Henry Herringman, at the sign of the Anchor on the Lower Walk of the new Exchange.