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Author: Horace.
Title: Horace. The best of lyrick poets. Containing much morality, and sweetnesse. Together with Aulus Persius Flaccus, his satyres. Translated into English by Barten Holyday sometime student of Christ-Church in Oxford.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Horace. The best of lyrick poets. Containing much morality, and sweetnesse. Together with Aulus Persius Flaccus, his satyres. Translated into English by Barten Holyday sometime student of Christ-Church in Oxford.
Horace., Persius., T. H., d. 1640,, Holyday, Barten, 1593-1661,

London: printed for W.R. and J.W., 1652.
Alternate titles: Selections. English. Best of lyrick poets.
Notes:
The translation of Horace is by Sir Thomas Hawkins. Cf. Madan, III, 2195.
"Aulus Persius Flaccus his satyres" (Wing P1662) has separate dated title page (dated 1650), register, and pagination.
Reproduction of the original in the British Library.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A44467.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Reader.
ODES OF HORACE.
The First Booke.
Ode. I. To MAECENAS. All things please not all men. HORACE most especially affecteth the name of a Lyrick. Poet.
Ode II. To AUGUSTUS CAESAR. Many stormes are powred upon the People of Rome in revenge of Julius Caesar slain. The only hope of the Empire is placed in the safty of Augustus.
Ode XXII. To ARISTIUS. Integrity of life is every where safe, which he proveth, by his owne example.
Ode XXIV. TO VIRGILL. Who immoderatly bemoned the death of Quintilius.
Ode XXVIII. Architas, a Philosopher and Geometrician is pre∣sented, answering to a certaine Marriner, that all men must dye, and entreating him, that bee would not suffer his body to ly on the shore unburied.
Ode XXXI. TO APOLLO. He desireth not riches of Apollo, but that hee may have a sound mind in a healthy body.
Ode XXXIV. TO HIMSELFE. Who repenteth, that having followed the Epicurean Sect, he thereby hath negligently honored the gods.
Ode XXXV. TO FORTUNE. Hee beseecheth her, that shee would preserve Caesar going into Brittany.
ODES OF HORACE.
Ode. II. To C. SALUSTIUS CHRISPUS. Hee prayseth Proculejus for liberalitie towards his brothers. Onely contempt of money maketh a man happie.
Ode III. TO DELIUS. Prosperous, and adverse Fortune are to be moderate∣ly borne, since one, and the selfe same condition of death, hangeth over every man.
Ode IX. TO VALOIUS. That now or length he would desist, to deplore his deceased Myste.
Ode X. TO LICINIUS. Mediocritie to be used in either Fortunes.
Ode XI. TO QUINTUS HIRPINUS. Cares layd aside, let us live merily.
Ode XIV. TO POSTHUMUS. Life is short, and Death is necessary.
Ode XV. Against the excesse of that Age.
Ode XVI. TO GROSPHUS. All men desire tranquilitie of mind which can nei∣ther with Riches, nor Honours bee acquired, but onely with bridleing our Appeties.
Ode XVII. TO MAECENAS being sicke. Whom hee resolveth not to survive.
Ode XVIII. Hee affirmeth himselfe content with little, while o∣thers are wholly addicted to their desires, and encrease of riches, as if they should alwayes live.
ODES OF HORACE.
Ode. I. Life is made happy, not with Riches but Mind's Tranquilitie.
Ode II. To his FRIENDS. Boyes are to bee enured from their tender age, to po∣verty, warfare, and painfull Life.
Ode. III. A man with vertue adorned, feareth nothing. Juno's Oration of Troy's overthrow, and the end of that warre. And how the Romane Empire shall take beginning from the Trojans.
Ode VI. To the ROMANS. Of the corrupt manners of that Age.
Ode IX. TO LYDIA. A Dialogue of his passed Loves, and renuing of them againe.
Ode XIV. To the ROMAN PEOPLE. This Ode containeth the praises of Augustus returning out of Spaine, after his Con∣quest over the Cantabrians.
Ode XVI. TOMAECENAS. All things lye open to Gold, but Horace is content with his owne Fortune, whereby hee is made happy.
Ode XXIV. Against covetous rich men.
Ode XXVIII. To LYDE. Heeperswadeth Lyde, to spend the day dedica∣ted to Neptune, pleasantly.
Ode XXIX. TO MAECENAS. Hee inviteth him to a merry Supper, lay∣ing publique cares aside.
Ode XXX. TO MELPOMENE, Horace hath obtained eternall glory, by writing of Lyrick Verses.
ODES OF HORACE.
Ode III. TO MELPOMENE. Horace is borne to Poetry, by whose ayd, hee hath obtained immortall glory.
Ode V. TO AUGUSTUS. That now at length he would returne into the City.
Ode VII. To LUCIUS MANLIUS TORQUATUS. Since time changeth all things, let us live merily.
Ode VIII. To MARTIUS CENSORINUS. There is nothing which can more immortalize men, then Poets Verses.
Ode XIII. TO VIRGILL. He describeth the reproach of the Spring, and inviteth Virgil under con∣dition to a Banquet.
Ode XIII. Against LYCE. Who being old, is become a scorne to young men.
Ode XV. The prayses of Augustus.
epodes
CERTAINE EPODS OF HORACE.
Epod. I. TO MAECENAS. Horace will travell with Maecenas going to the Actiack warres against. M. Anthony.
Epod. II. The praise of the Countrey life.
Epod VII. To the people of ROME. An Execration of the civill warre, raised, on the one side by Brutus, and Cassius; on the other, by Octavian, M. Anthony, and Le∣pidus the Roman Consulls.
Epod XIII. To his merry friends, that they should passe the Winter pleasantly.
miscellaneous poems
On the day of judgement. Mat. chap. 24. V. 29.30.31.
A briefe Meditation on Mans frailty.
An Elegy on the thrice Renowned Sir PHILIP SYDNEY.
title page
To the Author his most loved Friend, Dr BARTEN HOLYDAY.
To his loving Friend Master B. H. upon PERSIƲS translated.
encomium
Upon the happy Translation of the most difficult Satyrist, performed by his friend Master B. H.
To his kinde Friend Master B.H. Vpon his PERSIUS.
Aulus Persius Flaccus. HIS SATYRS The Prologue.
THE FIRST SATYRE. IN FORME OF A DIALOGUE.
THE SECOND SATYRE, VNTO HIS FRIEND PLOTIUS MACRINUS.
THE THIRD SATYRE.
THE FOVRTH SATYRE,
THE FIFT SATYRE. IN FORME OF A DIALOGUE.
THE SIXT AND LAST SATYRE, TO HIS FRIEND CAESIUS BASSUS a Lyrique Poet.
To the Author his very good Friend, D. BARTEN HOLYDAY
To my learned Friend D. BARTEN HOLYDAY upon his iudicious tran∣slation of PERSIUS.
AN APOSTROPHE OF THE Translator to his Author PERSIVS,
poem