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Author: Well-wisher to both peace and honour.
Title: Honours preservation without blood, or, A sober advice to duellists being a compendious tract of the most exquisite nature to appease the sudden fits of fury, which English-spirits have of late been too much subject to, with many cautions how without the loss of reputation, or the least imprint of cowardise, as well the nobility as gentry of this nation may refuse to hazard their lives and fortunes on such mean pretences of vindicating miscalled honour or unmanly gallatry, shewing likewise, into what dangerous inconviences men thrust themselves forward in such cases with as account how such duels prove plain murther, and are contrary to the laws of God and man / written by a well-wisher to both peace and honour.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Honours preservation without blood, or, A sober advice to duellists being a compendious tract of the most exquisite nature to appease the sudden fits of fury, which English-spirits have of late been too much subject to, with many cautions how without the loss of reputation, or the least imprint of cowardise, as well the nobility as gentry of this nation may refuse to hazard their lives and fortunes on such mean pretences of vindicating miscalled honour or unmanly gallatry, shewing likewise, into what dangerous inconviences men thrust themselves forward in such cases with as account how such duels prove plain murther, and are contrary to the laws of God and man / written by a well-wisher to both peace and honour.
Well-wisher to both peace and honour.

London: Printed for Phillip Brooksby, 1680.
Notes:
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
Dueling -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A44303.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE EPISTLE TO THE READER.
An Essay of Duelling.