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Author: Hill, Joseph, 1625-1707.
Title: The interest of these United Provinces being a defence of the Zeelanders choice : wherein is shewne I. That we ought unanimously to defend our selves, II. That if we cannot, it is better to be under England than France, in regard of religion, liberty, estates, and trade, III. That we are not yet to come to that extremity, but we may remaine a republick, and that our compliance with England is the onely meanes for this : together with severall remarkes upon the present, and conjectures on the future state of affaires in Europe, especially as relating to this republick / by a wellwisher to the reformed religion, and the welfare of these countries.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The interest of these United Provinces being a defence of the Zeelanders choice : wherein is shewne I. That we ought unanimously to defend our selves, II. That if we cannot, it is better to be under England than France, in regard of religion, liberty, estates, and trade, III. That we are not yet to come to that extremity, but we may remaine a republick, and that our compliance with England is the onely meanes for this : together with severall remarkes upon the present, and conjectures on the future state of affaires in Europe, especially as relating to this republick / by a wellwisher to the reformed religion, and the welfare of these countries.
Hill, Joseph, 1625-1707.

Middleburg: Printed by Thomas Berry ..., 1673.
Notes:
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Attributed to Joseph Hill. cf. NUC pre-1956.
Subject terms:
Netherlands -- History -- 1648-1714.
Europe -- Politics and government -- 1648-1715.
Netherlands -- Foreign relations -- 1648-1714.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A43795.0001.001

Contents
title page
A Summary of the ensuing Treatise.
To the Impartial Reader.
text
Sect. 1. The rise and state of the Question, viz. Whether upon sup∣posal of inability to defend our selves, it is our Interest to be under England or France, and the Zeelanders choice of the former.
Sect. 2. Arguments to prove the Hypothesis, the first whereof is from our Religious Concernments; wherein is shewn how great a support Religion is to a State, and how greatly it concern us to secure our Religion.
Sect. 3. The plea of France's granting us the liberty of our Religion considered.
Sect. 4: Objections from the danger of losing our Religion under England; from the Kings being a Papist, designing to set up Po∣pery; the increase, countenance, and tolleration of Papists, as al∣so from his joyning with France against us, and Church Governe∣ment by Bishops, all answered.
Sect. 5. The second Argument taken from Liberty. Wherein the dif∣ferent kinds, and degrees of Liberty under all sorts of Governe∣ment, are declared; and the probability of our enjoying greater freedome under England than France, argued.
Sect. 6. The third Argument which preponderates for England, is the preservation of our Estates: in regard of Souldiers vio∣lence, Governors Impositions, Publick Debts by Obligation, and Revenues of the Romish Church.
Sect. 7. The fourth Argument from Trade. This (viz. Merchan∣dise and Navigation) our chief secular interest: and friendship with England to secure the same. England and we Corrivals herein, the probability of getting more, as also enjoying the same with greater Peace under France, with other Arguments: largely debated, and the contrary evinced under England.
The disadvantages of being under France, and advantages of being under England.
Advantages under England, not to be expected under France.
Sect. 8. Several other Arguments and enducements to incline us rather for England, briefly mentioned. With an inference from the whole preceding discourse, that the friendship of England is to be prefered before that of France.
Sect. 9. That we are not yet come to that extremity, but we may still remain a Republick: in regard of our own strength, and our neighbours interest, Englands especially, that they had better lose Scotland or Ireland, than let the French have these Provinces. This War a Game at Hazard. Being engaged will go through, and Parliament probably assist therein.
Sect. 10. Compliance with England the only means of the Common∣wealths continuation.
Sect 11 Conjectures of future affairs. The motions of the ensuing summer likely to be quick and great. As to this Repulick, pro∣bably England may get a Bridle to curb us, France the sadle to ride us, Colen a supernumerary girth, Munster a boss of the Crup∣per. Our condition deplored and consolated. A caution for Eng∣land, and the Orange family. The Authors fears of what will at last befal us. The Spanish Netherlands a dying. The friendship of England and France sick at heart, and cannot live long. That of Spain and England sound at heart, and will recover.
Sect. 12. France's Ambition. Crowing greatnes. The cause thereof. We and England in the fault. The Common Intrest of Europe to op∣pose France particularly declared of the Empire, Spaine, England, Denmarke, and this Republick and Hans Townes. Yea of Sweden, Savoy, and Switzerland. The ballance of Europe to be kept even, and by whom.
Sect. 13. The Conclusion of the whole Discourse.
POSTSCRIPT.