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Author: Heylyn, Peter, 1600-1662.
Title: Keimåelia 'ekklåesiastika, The historical and miscellaneous tracts of the Reverend and learned Peter Heylyn, D.D. now collected into one volume ... : and an account of the life of the author, never before published : with an exact table to the whole.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Keimåelia 'ekklåesiastika, The historical and miscellaneous tracts of the Reverend and learned Peter Heylyn, D.D. now collected into one volume ... : and an account of the life of the author, never before published : with an exact table to the whole.
Heylyn, Peter, 1600-1662., Vernon, George, 1637-1720.

London: Printed by M. Clark for Charles Harper ..., 1681.
Notes:
First two words of title transliterated from Greek.
Each part has special t.p., but paged continuously.
The life of the author is by George Vernon.
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Marginal notes.
Subject terms:
Heylyn, Peter, -- 1600-1662.
Church of England -- Doctrines.
Church of England -- Bishops -- Temporal power.
Reformation -- England.
Sabbath -- Early works to 1800.
Arminianism.
Divine right of kings.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A43506.0001.001

Contents
title page
THE LIFE OF The most Learned and Reverend, Dr. PETER HEYLYN.
A Catalogue of such Books, as were written by this Learned Doctor.
title page
A General Preface TO THE READER; CONCERNING The Design and Method of the following WORK.
to the reader
The Way of the REFORMATION OF THE Church of England, DECLARED and JUSTIFIED, &c.
THE INTRODUCTION, Shewing the Occasion, Method, and Design of the whole discourse.
section 1
1. Of calling or assembling the Convocation of the Clergy, and the Authority thereof when convened together.
2. Of the Ejection of the Pope, and vesting the Supremacy in the Regal Crown.
3. Of the Translation of the Scriptures, and permitting them to be read in the English Tongue.
4. Of the Reformation of Religion in points of Doctrine.
5. Of the Reformation of the Church of England in the Forms of Worship, and the Times appointed thereunto.
6. Of the power of making Canons, for the well ordering of the Clergy, and the directing of the People in the publick Duties of Religion.
7. An Answer to the main Objections of either Party.
SECT. II. The manner of the Reformation of the Church of England declared and justified.
1. That the Church of England did not Innovate in the Ejection of the Pope, and settling the Supremacy in the Royal Crown.
2. That the Church of England might proceed to a Reformation without the Approbation of the Pope or Church of Rome.
3. That the Church of England might lawfully proceed to a Reformation without the help of a General Council, or calling in the aid of the Protestant Churches.
4. That the Church did not innovate in translating the Scriptures, and the publick Liturgie into vulgar tongues; and of the consequents thereof in the Church of England.
5. That the proceedings of this Church in setting out the English Liturgy, were not meerly Regal; and of the power of Soveraign Princes in Ecclesiastical affairs.
6. That the Clergy lost not any of their just Rights by the Act of Submission, and the power of calling and confirming Councils did anciently belong to the Christian Princes.
title page
To the Reader.
text
CHAP. I. What doth occurre, and whether any thing at all, for Set Forms of Prayer from the time of Adam unto Moses.
CHAP. II. That from the time of Moses unto that of David, the Jews were not with∣out a Liturgie or set form of Worship.
CHAP. III. Of the condition and estate of the Jewish Liturgy, from the time of David unto Christ.
CHAP. IV. That antiently the Gentiles had their Liturgies or prescribed Forms of publick Worship.
CHAP. V. That in the times of the Apostles Liturgies, or Set Forms of ministration in the Christian Church, were composed and used.
CHAP. VI. What doth occur concerning Liturgies and Set Forms of worship, betwixt the death of the Apostles, and the Empire of Constantine the Great.
CHAP. VII. Apparent proofs for Liturgies and Set Forms of Worship, betwixt the Reign of Constantine, and S. Austin's Death.
CHAP. VIII. Touching the Dedication of Churches, and the Anniversary Feasts thereby occasioned.
title page
THE PREFACE.
A BRIEF DISCOURSE, Touching the Form of Prayer, &c.
title page
TO THE READER.
The Undeceiving of the People In the Point of TITHES.
I. That never any Clergy in the Church of God, hath been, or is maintained with less charge to the Subject than the established Clergy of the Church of England.
II. That there is no man in the Kingdom of England, who payeth any thing of his own towards the maintenance and support of his Parish Minister, but his Easter-Offering.
III. That the change of Tithes into Stipends will bring greater trouble to the Clergy, than is yet considered; and far less profit to the Countrey, than is now pre∣tended.
title page
THE PREFACE TO THE READER.
THE HISTORY OF EPISCOPACY.
The First PART.
CHAP. I. The Christian Church first founded by our Lord and Saviour, in an Imparity of Ministers.
CHAP. II. The foundation of the Church of Hierusalem under the Government of Saint James the Apostle, and Simeon, one of the Disciples, the two first Bishops of the same.
CHAP. III. The Churches planted by Saint Peter, and his Disciples, originally founded in Episcopacy.
CHAP. IV. The Bishoping of Timothy and Titus, and others of Saint Pauls Disciples.
CHAP. V. Of the Authority and Jurisdiction given by the Word of God, to Ti∣mothy and Titus, and in them, to all other Bishops.
CHAP. VI. Of the Estate of holy Church, particularly of the Asian Churches, to∣ward the latter days of S. John the Apoistle.
The state of Holy Church in this first CENTURY.
title page
THE HISTORY OF EPISCOPACY.
PART II.
CHAP. I. What doth occur concerning Bishops, and the Government of the Church by them, during the first half of the second Century.
CHAP. II. The setling of Episcopacy together with the Gospel, in the Isle of Britain, by Pope Eleutherius.
CHAP. III. The Testimony given unto Episcopal Authority, in the last part of this second Century.
CHAP. IV. Of the authority in the government of the Church of Carthage, enjoyed and exercised by Saint Cyprian and other Bishops of the same.
CHAP. V. Of the condition and affairs of the two Patriarchal Churches of Alexandria and Antiochia.
CHAP. VI. Of the state wherein Episcopacy stood in the Western Churches, during the whole third Century.
A Brief CHRONOLOGY of the Estate of Holy Church, in these two last Centuries.
title page
TO THE MOST HIGH and MIGHTY Prince Charles, By the Grace of God, KING of Great Britain, France and Ireland, Defender of the Faith, &c.
A PREFACE To them, who being themselves mistaken, have misguided others in these new Doctrines of the Sabbath.
THE HISTORY OF THE SABBATH.
BOOK I. From the Creation of the World to the destruction of the Temple.
CHAP. I. That the SABBATH was not instituted in the Beginning of the World.
CHAP. II. That there was no Sabbath kept, from the Creation to the Flood.
CHAP. III. That the SABBATH was not kept from the Flood to Moses.
CHAP. IV. The nature of the fourth Commandment: and that the SABBATH was not kept among the Gentiles.
CHAP. V. The Practice of the Jews in such observances as were annexed unto the Sabbath.
CHAP. VI. Touching the observation of the SABBATH, unto the time the people were established in the Promised Land.
CHAP. VII. Touching the keeping of the SABBATH, from the time of David to the Maccabees.
CHAP. VIII. What doth occur about the SABBATH from the Maccabees, to destruction of the Temple.
title page
To the Christian Reader;
THE HISTORY OF THE SABBATH.
The Second Book.
CHAP. I. That there is nothing found in Scripture, touching the keeping of the Lords Day.
CHAP. II. In what estate the Lords day stood, from the death of the Apostles, to the reign of Constantine.
CHAP. III. That in the fourth Age from the time of Constantine to Saint Austin the Lords day was not taken for a Sabbath day.
CHAP. IV. The great improvement of the Lords day in the fifth and sixth Ages, make it not a Sabbath.
CHAP. V. That in the next six hundred years from Pope Gregory forwards, the Lords day was not reckoned of, as of a Sabbath.
CHAP. VI. What is the judgment of the Schoolmen and of the Protestants, and what the practice of those Churches in this Lords day business.
CHAP. VII. In what estate the Lords day stood in this Isle of Brittain, from the first Planting of Religion to the Reformation.
CHAP. VIII. The story of the Lords Day, from the Reformation of Religion, in this Kingdom, till this present time.
title page
TO THE READER.
Historia Quinqu-Articularis: OR, A DECLARATION Of the Judgment of the Western-Churches, &c.
CHAP. I. The several Heresies of those who make God to be the Author of Sin, or attribute too much to the Natural freedom of Man's Will in the Works of Piety.
CHAP. II. Of the Debates amongst the Divines in the Council of Trent, touch∣ing Predestinations, and Original Sin.
CHAP. III. The like Debates about Free-will, with the Conclusions of the Council, in the Five Controverted Points.
1. Of Divine Predestination.
2. Of the Merit and Effect of the Death of Christ.
3. Of Mans Conversion unto God.
4. Of the manner of Conversion.
5. Of the certainty or uncertainty of Perseverance.
CHAP. IV. The Judgment of the Lutherans and Calvinians in these Five Points, with some Objections made against the Conclusions of the Council of Dort.
1. Of Divine Predestinction.
2. Of the Merit and Efficacy of Christs Death.
3. Of Mans Will in the state of depraved Nature.
4. Of Conversion, and the manner of it.
5. Of falling after Grace received.
CHAP. V. The Doctrine of the Remonstrants, and the Story of them, until their final Condemnation in the Synod of Dort.
CHAP. VI. Objections made against the Doctrine of the Remonstrants, the Answer unto all, and the retorting of some of them on the Opposite Party.
Historia Quinqu-Articularis: OR, A DECLARATION Of the Judgment of the WESTERN-CHƲRCHES, And more particularly of the CHURCH of ENGLAND, In the Five Controverted Points.
CHAP. VII. An Introduction to the Doctrine of the Church of England in the Points disputed, with the Removal of some rubs which are laid in the way.
CHAP. VIII. Of the Preparatives to the Reformation, and the Doctrine of the Church in the present points.
1. Of Divine Predestination.
2. Of the Redemption of the World by the faith of Christ.
4. Of the manner of Conversion.
5. Of the uncertainty of Perseverance.
CHAP. IX. Of the Doctrine of Predestination delivered in the Articles, the Ho∣milies, the publick Liturgies, and the Writings of some of the Reformers.
CHAP. X. The Doctrine of the Church concerning Reprobatin and Universal Redemption.
CHAP. XI. Of the Heavenly influences of Gods grace in the Conversion of a Sinner, and mans co-operation with those Heavenly influences.
CHAP. XII. The Doctrine of Freewill agreed upon by the Clergy in their Con∣vocation, Anno 1543.
CHAP. XIII. The Doctrine of the Church of England, concerning the certainty or uncertainty of Perseverance.
CHAP. XIV. The Plain Song of the second Homily, touching the falling from God, and the Descants made upon it.
CHAP. XV. Of the Author and Authority of King Edwards Catechism, as also of the judgment of Martin Bucer, and Peter Martyr in the Points disputed.
Historia Quinqu-Articularis: OR, A DECLARATION Of the Judgment of the WESTERN-CHƲRCHES, And more particularly of the CHURCH of ENGLAND, In the Five Controverted Points.
CHAP. XVI. Of the first breakings out of the Predestinarians, and their Proceedings in the same.
CHAP. XVII. Of the Disputes among the Confessors in Prison in Queen Maries days, and the Resetling of the Church on her former Principles under Queen Elizabeth.
CHAP. XVIII. A Declaration of the Doctrine in the Points disputed under the new establishment made by Queen Elizabeth.
CHAP. XIX. Of the first great breach which was made in the Doctrine of the Church, by whom it was made, and what was done towards the making of it up.
CHAP. XX. Of the great Innovation made by Perkins in the publick Doctrine, the stirs arising thence in Cambridge, and Mr. Barrets carriage in them.
CHAP. XXI. Of the proceedings against Baroe, the Articles of Lambeth, and the general calm which was in Oxon, touching these Disputes.
CHAP. XXII. Of the Conference at Hampton Court, and the several encouragements given to the Anti-Calvinians in the time of King James.
A POSTSCRIPT TO THE READER, Concerning some particulars in a scurrilous Pam∣phlet intituled, A Review of the Certamen Epistolare, &c.
title page
THE PREFACE.
The Argument and occasion of this following Treatise.
THE STUMBLING-BLOCK OF Disobedience and Rebellion, &c.
CHAP. I. The Doctrine of Obedience laid down by CALVIN, and of the Popular Officers supposed by him, whereby he overthroweth that Doctrine.
CHAP. II. Of the Authority of the Ephori in the State of Sparta; and that they were not instituted for the ends supposed by Calvin.
CHAP. III. Of the Incroachments of the Tribunes on the State of Rome; and that they were not instituted for the ends supposed by Calvin.
CHAP. IV. Of what Authority the DEMARCHI were in the state of A∣THENS, and of the danger and unfitness of the instances pro∣duced by CALVIN.
CHAP. V. What are the three Estates in each several Kingdom, in which CAL∣VIN speaks, and what particularly in the Realm of England.
CHAP. VI. That the three Estates of every Kingdom whereof Calvin speaks, have no Authority either to regulate the power, or control the actions of the Sovereign Prince.
title page
A PREFACE.
De jure Paritatis Episcoporum; OR, The Right of Peerage vindicated to the BISHOPS OF ENGLAND.
A TABLE OF THE CONTENTS.
The Way of the Reformation of the Church of England declared and justified.
SECT. I.
SECT. II.
Of Liturgies.
CHAP. I. What doth occur, and whether any thing at all, for set Forms of Prayer from the time of Adam unto Moses.
CHAP. II. That from the time of Moses unto that of Da∣vid, the Jews were not without a Liturgy, or set Form of Worship.
CHAP. III. Of the condition and estate of the Jewish Li∣turgy from the time of David unto Christ.
CHAP. IV. That antiently the Gentiles had their Liturgies or prescribed Forms of Prayer and publick Worship of God.
CHAP. V. That in the time of the Apostles Liturgies or set Forms of Ministration in the Christian Church, were composed and used.
CHAP. VI. What doth occur concerning Liturgies and Set Forms of Worship, betwixt the death of the Apostles, and the Empire of Constantine the Great.
CHAP. VII. Apparent proofs for Liturgies and Set Forms of Worship, betwixt the Reign of Constan∣tine and St. Austins death.
CHAP. VIII. A Corollary touching the Dedication of Churches, and of the Anniversary Feasts thereby occasioned.
Of the Form of Prayer appointed to be used by Preachers before their Sermons.
The Undeceiving of the People in the point of Tithes.
The History of Episcopacy.
PART I.
CHAP. I. The Christian Church first founded by our Lord and Saviour, in an imparity of Mini∣sters.
CHAP. II. The foundation of the Church of Hierusalem under the Government of Saint James the Apostle, and Simeon one of the Disciples, the two first Bishops of the same.
CHAP. III. The Churches planted by Saint Peter, and his Disciples, originally founded in Episcopacy.
CHAP. IV. The Bishoping of Timothy and Titus, and other of Saint Pauls Disciples.
CHAP. V. Of the Authority and Jurisdiction given unto Timothy and Titus; and in them to all other Bishops by the Word of God.
CHAP. VI. Of the estate of holy Church, particularly of the Asian Churces, toward the later days of Saint John the Apostle.
PART II.
CHAP. I. What doth occur concerning Bishops, and the Government of the Church by them, during the first half of the second Century.
CHAP. II. The setling of Episcopacy together with the Gospel, in the Isle of Britain, by Pope Eleu∣therius.
CHAP. III. The Testimony given to Episcopal Authority, in the last part of this second Century.
CHAP. IV. Of the Authority in the Government of the Church of Carthage, enjoyed and exercised by Saint Cyprian and other Bishops of the same.
CHAP. V. Of the condition and affairs of the two Patri∣archal Churches of Alexandria, and Antiochia.
CHAP. VI. Of the estate wherein Episcopacy stood in the Western Churches, during the whole third Century.
The History of the Sabbath.
BOOK I. From the Creation of the World to the destruction of the Temple.
CHAP. I. That the Sabbath was not instituted in the Be∣ginning of the World.
CHAP. II. That there was no Sabbath kept, from the Cre∣ation to the Flood.
CHAP. III. That the Sabbath was not kept from the Flood to Moses.
CHAP. IV. The nature of the fourth Commandment: and that the Sabbath was not kept among the Gentiles.
CHAP. V. The practice of the Jews in such observances as were annexed unto the Sabbath.
CHAP. VI. Touching the observation of the Sabbath, unto the time the People were established in the Promised Land.
CHAP. VII. Touching the keeping of the Sabbath, from the time of David to the Maccabees.
CHAP. VIII. What doth occur about the Sabbath, from the Maccabees to the destruction of the Temple.
BOOK II.
CHAP. I. That there is nothing found in Scripture, touch∣ing the keeping of the Lords day.
CHAP. II. In what estate the Lords day stood, from the death of the Apostles to the Reign of Constantine.
CHAP. III. That in the fourth Age from the time of Con∣stantine to Saint Austine, the Lords day was not taken for a Sabbath day.
CHAP. IV. The great improvement of the Lords day, in the fifth and sixth Ages, make it not a Sabbath.
CHAP. V. That in the next six hundred years from Pope Gregory forwards, the Lords day was not reckoned of, as of a Sabbath.
CHAP. VI. What is the judgment of the School-men, and of the Protestants; and what the practice of those Churches in this Lords day business.
CHAP. VII. In what estate the Lords day stood in this Isle of Britain, from the first planting of Religion, to the Reformation.
CHAP. VIII. The story of the Lords day, from the Reforma∣tion of Religion in this Kingdom, till this present time.
Historia Quinqu-Articularis: Or, a Declaration of the Judgment of the Western Churches; and more particularly of the Church of England, in the five Controverted Points, &c.
part 1
CHAP. I. The several Heresies of those who make God to be the Author of Sin, or attribute too much to the Natural freedom of Man's Will in the Works of Piety.
CHAP. II. Of the Debates amongst the Divines in the Council of Trent, touching Predestination and Original Sin.
CHAP. III. The like Debates about Free-will, with the Conclusions of the Council, in the five Con∣troverted Points.
CHAP. IV. The judgment of the Lutherans and Calvinians in these five Points, with some Objections made against the Conclusions of the Council of Dort.
CHAP. V. The Doctrine of the Remonstrants, and the story of them, until their final Condemna∣tion in the Synod of Dort.
CHAP. VI. Objections made against the Doctrine of the Remonstrants; the Answer unto all, and the retorting of some of them on the opposite Party.
part 2
CHAP. VII. An Introduction to the Doctrine of the Church of England in the points disputed, with the Removal of some rubs which are laid in the way.
CHAP. VIII. Of the Preparatives to the Reformation, and the Doctrine of the Church in the present points.
CHAP. IX. Of the Doctrine of Predestination delivered in the Articles, the Homilies, the publique Li∣turgies, and the Writings of some of the Reformers.
CHAP. X. The Doctrine of the Church concerning Re∣probation and Universal Redemption.
CHAP. XI. Of the Heavenly influences of Gods grace in the Conversion of a Sinner, and a mans co∣operation with those Heavenly influences.
CHAP. XII. The Doctrine of Free-will agreed upon by the Clergy in their Convocation, An. 1543.
CHAP. XIII. The Doctrine of the Church of England, con∣cerning the certainty or uncertainty of Per∣severance.
CHAP. XIV. The Plain Song of the second Homily, touch∣ing the falling from God, and the Descants made upon it.
CHAP. XV. Of the Author and Authority of King Edwards Chatechism, as also of the judgment of Mar∣tin Bucer, and Peter Martyr, in the Points disputed.
PART III.
CHAP. XVI. Of the first breakings out of the Predestinarians, and their Proceedings in the same.
CHAP. XVII. Of the disputes amongst the Confessors in Pri∣son, in Queen Maries days, and the resetling of the Church on her former principles under Queen Elizabeth.
CHAP. XVIII. A Declaration of the Doctrine in the Points disputed under the new establishment made by Queen Elizabeth.
CHAP. XIX. Of the first great breach which was made in the Doctrine of the Church; by whom it was made, and what was done towards the making of it up.
CHAP. XX. Of the great Invocation made by Perkins in the publick Doctrine, the stirs arising thence in Cambridge, and Mr. Barrets carriage in them.
CHAP. XXI. Of the proceedings against Baroe, the Articles of Lambeth, and the general calm which was in Oxon, touching these Disputes,
CHAP. XXII. Of the Conference at Hampton Court, and the several encouragements given to the Anti-Calvinians in the time of King James.
The Stumbling-Block of Disobedience and Rebellion, &c.
CHAP. I. The Doctrine of Obedience laid down by Calvin, and of the Popular Officers supposed by him, whereby he overthroweth that Doctrine.
CHAP. II. Of the Authority of Ephori in the State of Sparta, and that they were not instituted for the ends supposed by Calvin.
CHAP. III. Of the Incroachments of the Tribunes on the State of Rome; and that they were not insti∣tuted for the ends supposed by Calvin.
CHAP. IV. Of what Authority the Demarchi were in the State of Athens; and of the danger and un∣fitness of the instances produced by Calvin.
CHAP. V. What are the three Estates in each several King∣dom, of which Calvin speaks, and what par∣ticularly in the Realm of England.
CHAP. VI. That the three Estates of every Kingdom where∣of Calvin speaks, have no Authority either to regulate the power, or controll the Actions of the Sovereign Prince.