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Author: Garcâia, Carlos, doctor.
Title: Guzman, Hinde, and Hannam outstript being a discovery of the whole art, mistery and antiquity of theeves and theeving, with their statutes, laws, customs and practises, together with many new and unheard of cheats and trepannings.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Guzman, Hinde, and Hannam outstript being a discovery of the whole art, mistery and antiquity of theeves and theeving, with their statutes, laws, customs and practises, together with many new and unheard of cheats and trepannings.
Garcâia, Carlos, doctor., W. M.

London: [s.n.], 1657.
Alternate titles: Desordenada codicia de los bienes agenos. English
Notes:
Translation of: Desordenada codicia de los bienes agenos.
Attributed to Carlos Garcia. Cf. Wing (2nd ed.).
Translated by William Melvin.
A reissue with new t.p. of: The sonne of the rogve. 1638.
Reproduction of original in Huntington Library.
Subject terms:
Thieves.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A42225.0001.001

Contents
title page
The Preface to the Reader.
THE ANTIQIVTIE OF THEEVES
CHAP. I. In which the Author compa∣reth the miseries of Prison to the paines of Hell.
CHAP. II. Of a pleasant discourse which the Author had in Prison with a famous Theife.
CHAP. III. To whom the Theefe relateth the Noblenesse and Excel∣lencie of Theft.
CHAP. IIII. To him the Thiefe relateth the life and death of his Parents and the first disgrace that befell him.
CHAP. V. Of the first Theefe that was in the world and whence theft had its beginning.
CHAP. VI. The theefe followeth his histo∣rie proving that all men of what qualitie so ever are Theeves.
CHAP. VII. Of the difference and variety of Theeves.
CHAP. VIII. The Theefe continueth the differences among Theeves with three disgraces that befell him.
CHAP. IX. Wherein the Theefe relateth his wittie diligence to free himselfe out of the Gal∣lies of Marseiles.
CHAP. X. In which he proceedeth to re∣late his invention, begun with some discourses of Love, be∣tween the Governour of the house and this Gallie∣slave.
CHAP. XI. In which the Theefe relateth the disgrace that happened to him, about a Chaine of Pearle.
CHAP. XII. In which the Thiefe relateth the last disgrace that be∣fell him.
CHAP. XIII. Of the Statutes and Lawes of Theeves.
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