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Author: Elton, Richard, fl. 1650.
Title: The compleat body of the art military in three books : I. The postures of the pike and musket ..., II. Twelve exercises ..., III. The drawing up and exercising of regiments after the manner of private companies ... : also, the duties of all souldiers and officers ... / by Richard Elton ... ; to which is added a supplement comprehending these particulars, I. the duties and qualifications of all officers belonging to an army .., formerly written by Capt. Tho. Rudd ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The compleat body of the art military in three books : I. The postures of the pike and musket ..., II. Twelve exercises ..., III. The drawing up and exercising of regiments after the manner of private companies ... : also, the duties of all souldiers and officers ... / by Richard Elton ... ; to which is added a supplement comprehending these particulars, I. the duties and qualifications of all officers belonging to an army .., formerly written by Capt. Tho. Rudd ...
Elton, Richard, fl. 1650., Rudd, Thomas, 1584?-1656.

London: Printed for W.L. and are to be sold by Henry Brome ... and Thomas Bassett ..., 1668.
Notes:
Page 39 misnumbered as 34.
Reproduction of original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Military art and science -- Early works to 1800.
Soldiers -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A39333.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
dedication
THE COMPLEAT BODY OF The Art Military. The First BOOK.
CHAP. I. A discourse of the Postures, and handling of Arms.
CHAP. II. Several Reasons why the Pike is the more honourable Arms.
CHAP. III. The Postures of the Pike.
CHAP. IV. The Postures of the Musket.
CHAP. V. The Postures and Charges of the Pike, to be performed in a shorter way, all things acted in order, and nothing done twice.
CHAP. VI. The Postures of the Musket collected in a brief way.
CHAP. VII. There is also a conformity of Posture with the Musket to those of the Pike, and Words of Command to be given, as may in many things be received by both Arms.
CHAP. VIII. The use of the Postures of the Pike.
CHAP. IX. The use of the Postures of the Musket.
How a Muskettier shall perform the Sentinel-posture.
CHAP. X. The manner and way to do the Funeral-posture.
The reducement of the Musket from the Funeral-posture.
CHAP. XI. The Souldiers desire to know every particular place of Dignity, as they stand in Rank and File.
CHAP. XII. Reasons for the places of Dignity both in Rank and File, for the first four in a File eight deep.
CHAP. XIII. Reasons of the places of the second four, as they stand in Rank and File, the File being eight deep.
CHAP. XIV. Other Reasons to cleer it further to the Souldier.
CHAP. XV. Reasons given for the last Table of every particular Place of Honour and Dignity, as they stand.
CHAP. XVI. Reasons likewise to be given for the Table 12 abrest, and 12 deep.
CHAP. XVII. Brief reasons to be given of the Dignity of places of a Rank ten abrest, and of a File ten deep.
CHAP. XVIII. What Distance is, and the reasons for the first beginning of the same, with all their several uses.
CHAP. XIX. The several sorts of Distances which are fit and proper for the Souldier to be exercised in.
CHAP. XX. Words of Command for the opening of Ranks and Files to all their Distances, with their closings again.
CHAP. XXI. The use of each particular Distance, and at what time to be used.
CHAP. XXII. Directions of the way and manner of drawing up a private Company.
CHAP. XXIII. Several reasons given for the placing of the Serjeants after this manner.
CHAP. XXIV. Before I come to make description of a Body, I shall shew some further Reasons of the Serjeants places of lesser Companies, with the placing of the Drums.
CHAP. XXIV. A Description of a Body of men throughout, with all their several parts and kinds.
CHAP. XXVI. Directions to all such as shall desire to exercise a Foot-Company, with some admoni∣tions to the Souldiers as shall be exercised by them.
CHAP. XXVII. Of Facings, of their several kinds, and of their use, with the words of command for performance of the same.
CHAP. XXVIII. The words of Command for Facings.
CHAP. XXIX, The many variety of Doublings, with their parts and uses set forth for the practice of any Commander, to make use of according unto his own discretion.
CHAP. XXX. The words of Command for all Entire Doublings to the Front, to be performed one time or other in time of Exercise.
CHAP. XXXI. Divisional Doublings to the Front.
CHAP. XXXII. Entire Doublings to the Front by Wheelings.
CHAP. XXXIII. A divisional Doubling to the Front by Wheeling.
CHAP. XXXIV. Entire Doublings to the right Flank.
CHAP. XXXV. Divisional Doublings to the right Flank.
CHAP. XXXVI. Entire Doublings to right Flank by Wheeling.
CHAP. XXXVII. A Divisional Doubling to the right Flank by Wheeling.
CHAP. XXXVIII. Of Inversion and Conversion.
CHAP. XXXIX. The words of Command for Ranks ranking, and Files ranking to the Front, they being twelve abrest, and six deep.
CHAP. XL. Ranks ranking into the Front by Countermarch.
CHAP. XLI. Files ranking into the Front by Wheeling.
CHAP. XLII. Ranks ranking, or Files ranking at one and the same time into Front, Reer, and Midst.
Of Files ranking into Front, Reer, and Midst.
CHAP. XLIII. Of Files ranking by Wheeling.
CHAP. XLIV. Of Ranks filing, or of Files filing, or of Inversion, with their several sorts and kinds.
CHAP. XLV. Ranks wheeling into the Flanks.
CHAP. XLVI. Of Files filing, or Ranks filing to both the Flanks and the Midst at one and the same time.
CHAP. XLVII. Of Ranks wheeling to both the Flanks.
CHAP. XLVIII. Of Ranks wheeling to the midst of Files.
CHAP. XLIX. Of Ranks wheeling to both Flanks, and into the midst, at one and the same time.
CHAP. L. Of Counter-marches, with thir several sorts and kinds, affording much variety in time of Exercise.
CHAP. LI. Intire Counter-marching of Files.
CHAP. LII. Divisional Counter-marching of Files.
CHAP. LIII. Intire Counter-marches of Ranks.
CHAP. LIV. Divisional Counter-marches of the right and left Half-ranks.
CHAP. LV. Of Wheelings, with their several uses.
CHAP. LVI. Intire Wheelings.
CHAP. LVII. Divisional Wheelings.
CHAP. LVIII. Of Firings, either for delight or service.
CHAP. LIX. Several Firings to be performed with any number of men.
CHAP. LX. The way to make every man in a File six deep according to succession a File-leader, by doublings, not using one word of command twice.
CHAP. LXI. The way to make every man in a File six deep File-leader according to dignity, by a doubling, not using one Word of command twice.
CHAP. LXII. The way to make every man in a File eight deep File-leader by succession, and that by doubling, not using one Word of command twice.
CHAP. LXIII. The way to make every man in a File eight deep, a File-leader according unto dignity, by a doubling.
CHAP. LXIV. Concerning Figures of Battail to be performed by singles Files, with some admonitions to those that shall practice themselves therein.
CHAP. LXV. Military experiments upon a File six deep, branching forth eight several Figures of Battail, with their reducement.
CHAP. LXVI. Words of Command to produce the first Eight Figures of Battail, with their Reducement.
CHAP. LXVII. Words of Command for the second Eight Figures of Battail, with their Reducement.
CHAP. LXVIII. Words of Command for the third Eight Figures of Battail, with their Reducement.
CHAP. LXIX. The way to make twelve several Figures of Battail, with a File ten deep, with their Reducement.
CHAP. LXX. Twelve several Figures of Battail with a File twelve deep, with their Reducement.
THE COMPLEAT BODY OF The Art Military. The Second BOOK.
CHAP. I. Concerning the Artillery and the Military Gardens, together with the Private Meetings, in and about the City of LONDON.
CHAP. II. The first Exercise of four Files six deep.
CHAP. III. A Doubling consisting of sixteen in number, every one differing from the other, and not reduced until the last Word of Command.
CHAP. IV. Eight several Counter-marches, with their Reducement.
CHAP. V. Ten several Wheelings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. VI. Six Figures of Battail, with several Firings thereunto belonging.
CHAP. VII. The second Exercise, with four Files six deep.
CHAP. VIII. Eighteen several Doublings with their reducements.
CHAP. IX. Twelve several Counter-marches, with their reducements.
CHAP. X. Twelve several Wheelings, with their Reducements.
CHAP. XI. Several plain Firings upon this Exercise of 24 men, with Figures of Battail belonging to the same.
CHAP. XII. The third Exercise, with four Files six deep.
CHAP. XIII. Thirty several Words of Command of Inversion and Conversion.
CHAP. XIV. Next followeth several Figures of Battail, with Firings upon the same, for the per∣formance whereof,
CHAP. XV. The fourth Exercise, consisting of four Files eight deep.
CHAP. XVI. The Fifth Exercise, with four Files Eight deep.
CHAP. XVII. Thirty several Doublings, with their Reducements.
CHAP. XVIII. Plain Firings and Figures of Battail.
CHAP. XVIII. The Sixth Exercise, with four Files eight deep.
GHAP. XIX. Thirty Doublings by Counter-marches, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XX. Plain Firings, and Figures of Battail.
CHAP. XXI. The seventh Exercise, consisting of sixty four men, eight Files eight deep.
CHAP. XXII. Two and twenty several Doublings by Wheelings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXIII. Several Firings, and Figures of Battail, with sixty four men.
CHAP. XXIV. The Eighth Exercise, consisting of sixty four men, eight Files eight deep.
CHAP. XXV. Several Figures of Battail.
CHAP. XXVI. The ninth Exercise, consisting of 64 men, eight Files eight deep.
CHAP. XXVIII. Eight several Counter-marches, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXIX. Ten several Wheelings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXX. Plain Firings, and Figures of Battail.
CHAP. XXXI. The tenth Exercise, consisting of 24 Files being six deep, according to the first drawing up of a private Company.
CHAP. XXXII. Eight entire several Doublings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXXIII. Eight several Countermarches, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXXIV. Eight entire Doublings by Wheelings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXXV. Plain Firings, and Figures of Battail.
CHAP. XXXVI. The eleventh Exercise, with 24 Files six deep.
CHAP. XXXVII. Eight Counter-marches, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXXVIII. Eight several Wheelings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XXXIX. Plain Firings, and Figures of Battail.
CHAP. XL. The twelfth Exercise, consisting of 24 Files, six deep.
CHAP. XLI. A Doubling to make every man a File-Leader by dignity.
CHAP. XLII. Several Wheelings, with their Reducements.
CHAP. XLIII. Plain Figures, and figures of Battail.
THE COMPLEAT BODY OF The Art Military. The Third BOOK.
CHAP. I. Concerning the drawing up of Regiments, with their several Numbers, Fronts, Manner and Ways.
CHAP. II. The manner of drawing up a Regiment consisting of six Companies, containing in it a Colonel, a Lieutenant-Colonel, a Major, and three Captains, every one having 108 men in a Company, and the three Field-Officers 144. which makes compleatly up 756 men, whereof two thirds are Muskettiers, and one third of Pikes, the Files being six deep.
CHAP. III. The Reasons follow for the placing of the Captains, their Colours, and their Lieutenants, after the manner before set down.
CHAP. IV. More particular Reasons for the placing of the Captains and Lieutenants of the first grand Division.
CHAP. V. Reasons for the placing of the Officers of the second grand Division.
CHAP. VI. The ordering of a Regiment to the long March, with the placing of the Officers, and the leading of Carriages.
CHAP. VII. The first Exercise of a Regiment in the plainest and easiest way.
CHAP. VIII. A second way of exercising Regiments of the same number of men.
CHAP. IX. Doublings belonging to a Regiment.
CHAP. X. Four several Wheelings, with their Reducement.
CHAP. XI. Countermarches not fit to be used in the Exercising of Regiments.
CHAP. XII. Several Firings to be performed upon the former Figure, and how to be managed by the several Officers.
CHAP. XIII. The manner of drawing up a Regiment, consisting of seven Companies, conteining in the four Captains, twelve Files of Muskettiers, and six of Pikes, in each of their particular Companies, and in the three Field-Officers, sixteen Files apiece of Musket∣tiers, and eight of Pikes, which amounts to the number of 864 men.
CHAP. XIV. The manner of drawing up and placing the Officers of a Regiment consisting of eight Companies, having in it a Colonel, a Lieutenant-Colonel, a Major, and five Captains: their number of men in each Company, being equal with the former Regiment, they amount unto 972 men.
CHAP. XV. How to make the Figure of a Ring, with its use and service.
CHAP. XVIII. The manner of drawing up a Regiment consisting of ten Companies, having in it seven Captains, and three Field-Officers, being in each particular Company the former numbers, which in all amounts unto 1198 men.
CHAP. XVII. The manner both of the drawing up, and the order of the Long-march of Colonel Rains∣borough his Regiment, bringing up the Reer of the Foot of the Army under the Com∣mand of the Lord General Fairfax, at their first marching through the City of Lon∣don, on the seventh of August, 1647.
CHAP. XVIII. A third way of drawing up a Regiment of Ten Companies, after the manner used amongst the Swedes.
CHAP. IX. The way of drawing up a Regiment consisting of twelve Companies, the nine Captains having eighteen Files in each Company, and the three Field-Officers every one of them twenty four Files; whereof, there are two thirds of Muskettiers, and one of Pikes, in each particular Company, amounting in all to 1404 men.
CHAP. XX. The manner of drawing up a Regiment according to the Swedish Brigade.
CHAP. XXI. The manner of drawing up a Brigade or Tertia, being a third part of an Army, accord∣ing to the practise of the Netherlands, under the command of the Prince of Orange.
CHAP. XXII. How to draw up an Army of twelve Regiments of Foot, and three of Horse, the Foot amounting unto 11664 men, and the Horse unto 3000; in all 14664 men.
CHAP. XXIII. The several duties belonging to the Foot in a Regiment, as followeth by degrees from a private Souldier unto a Colonel of the same: and first, of a Private Souldier.
The duty of a Sentinel.
Of a Gentleman of a Company.
Of a Barber-Chyrurgion.
Of a Clerk of a Company.
Of a Drum-Major.
Of the Drummers to a private Company.
Of a Gentleman of Arms.
Of a Lanspassadoe.
The duty of a Corporal.
Of the Martial of a Regiment.
Of a Quarter-Master.
The duty of a Serjeant.
Of an Ensign.
Of a Lieutenant.
Of a Captain.
Of a Serjeant-Major.
Of a Lieutenant-Colonel.
Of a Colonel.
Of Guides.
Of Scouts.
Of Spies.
CHAP. XXIV. Of Military Watches.
CHAP. XXV. The ordering of a private Company unto a Funeral-occasion.
CHAP. XXVI. The ordering of a Regiment to a Funeral-occasion.
The Postures of the Musket to be performed without the Rest.
An Advertisement to the Souldiery of the Nation.
title page
THE PUBLISHER To the READER.
A SUPPLEMENT TO THE COMPLEAT BODY OF The Art Military.
I. Of the General of the Horse.
II. Of the Lieutenant-General of Horse.
III. Of the Commissary-General,
IV. Of the Quartermaster-General.
V. Of the Captain.
VI. Of the Lieutenant.
VII. Of the Cornet.
VIII. Of the particular Quarter-Masters.
IX. Of the Corporals.
X. Of the Trumpeters.
XI. Of the Auditor.
XII. Of the Provost-Marshal.
CONCERNING The Enrolling, Arming, and Exercising OF THE CAVALRY.
I. Of the Arming of the Cuirassier.
II. Of managing of the Horse and Arms.
Of Exercising the Cuirassier.
Of Exercising the Harquebusier and Carbine.
Of Exercising the Dragoon.
Of Exercising the Cavalry in their Motions.
The manner how a Troop of 60 Horse, besides Officers, should March in∣to the Field to be Exercised, as it is in use at this day.
Concerning The MARCHING of an ARMY Both HORSE & FOOT, With the Train of Artillery, Baggage, &c. Exemplified in an Army of 22000 Foot, and 5000 Horse. With the manner how the Prince of Orange Marched to besiege Groll.
The Marching of an Army.
The Order that the Prince of Orange Marched in, going to besiege Groll.
How to pass a strait.
The manner of passing a River.
A List of Ammunition and other necessaries to March with eight half-Cannon, six quarter-Cannon, and sixteen Field-pieces, al∣lowing every half-Cannon 150 Shot, every quarter-Cannon 100. and every Field-piece 80. with the number of Waggons thereto needful.
A List of Ammunition and such Warlike necessaries as the Prince of Orange takes with him in Shipping when he goes to the Field.
A List of what his Highness takes out of this to carry upon Waggons, when he marcheth by Land; with the number of Waggons thereto ne∣cessary, allowing every Waggon to carry 1000 weight.
The ART of Designing, Measuring and Laying out Of the QUARTERS, For the ENCAMPING Of an ARMY In the FIELD. VVith ORDERS to be given out in such a QUARTER. Also ORDERS for WATCHING, And other General Observations.
What Rules are to be observed in the choice of the Ground to Quarter in.
How the Quarter-master is to design his Quarters when the Ground is chosen.
How the Quarters are to be laid out in the Field.
Concerning the securing of the Quarters by Entrenchment, Redoubts, &c.
Quartering of Horse.
The manner how the Prince of Orange his Army was Quarte∣red, with the General Officers, Artillery, Waggons, &c.
Orders to be given out in a Quarter.
Orders for Watching.
Imbatteling.
Observations.
Of a Chase.
Of a Retreat.
The Order that the Prince of Orange retired in from Gelders.
MILITARY ARCHITECT: Or, a short Treatise of FORTIFICATION, Regular and Irregular. With the manner how to strengthen the said Forti∣fications with Redoubts, Ravelins, Half-Moons, &c.
Two Principal Propositions Geometrical, useful in Fortification.
Prop. I. A Circle being giuen, to find the side of any Polygon that may be inscribed within the same Circle, the number of Sides not exceeding ten.
Prop. II. To finde out the length of the Semi-diameter of a Circle, that the side of the Polygon therein inscribed, shall be in length equal to a right Line given.
Two useful and necessary Tables, containing the Quantity of all the Lines and Angles in all Regular Fortifications; from a Fort of four Sides, to one of ten Sides.
The use of the two foregoing Tables in the delineation of a Regular Fort of five Sides or Bastions.
Concerning the farther strengthning of your Fort by Half-Moons, Horn-works, Redoubts, &c.
I. Of the Half-Moon.
How to delineate a Raveline.
II. Of the Horn-work.
Of Irregular Fortifications.
Some Principles of the GUNNERS-ART: Containing so much thereof as is absolutely neces∣sary for a compleat Souldier to be acquainted with, and (in case of necessity) to put in practice.
The names of such Pieces of Artillery as are now most in use.
The Ichnographical Description and Names belonging to the several parts of a Cannon, or other Piece of Artillery.
What proportion the several parts of the Carriage ought to bear to the Gun it is to carry, as also of the Rammer, Ladle, Lanade, or Spunge, &c.
Of the Ladle.
Of the Rammer.
Of the Lanade or Spunge.
Cautions.
How to Load any piece of Ordnance both surely and fafely.
Another way of Loading a Piece of Artillery.
How to Dispart any Piece of Ordnance.
How to level your Piece to shoot at any Mark within Point-Blank.
The first Shot being defective, how to amend it in the second.
To make a good Shot in a dark Night at a Mark that hath been shewn you in the Day-time.
How you may shoot at your Enemies Lights in his Quarters in a dark Night.
How you may make a Shot at a party of Horse or Foot, as they pass by; as also at a Ship Sayling up or down a River.
The composition, making, and use of the two Prin∣cipal Fire-works belonging to WAR, viz. THE GRANADO and PETARD.
I. Of the Granado.
II. Of the Petard.
To prime your Petards and Granadoes, use this following Composition.
The CONTENTS of the Chapters.
The First Book.
The Second Book.
The Third Book.
The CONTENTS of the SUPPLEMENT.