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Author: Lover of learning and a hearty well-wisher to his beloved country.
Title: The compendious schoolmaster teaching the English-tongue after a more easie & demonstrable method than hath been hitherto published or taught ... / by a lover of learning and a hearty well-wisher to his beloved country.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The compendious schoolmaster teaching the English-tongue after a more easie & demonstrable method than hath been hitherto published or taught ... / by a lover of learning and a hearty well-wisher to his beloved country.
Lover of learning and a hearty well-wisher to his beloved country., R. W.

London: Printed for Samuel Lowndes, 1688.
Notes:
Address to the reader signed: R.W.
"Licensed Nov. 9, 1687. Rob. Midgley."
"Wherein are contained: I. Facil and familiar directions for the true sound of letters, II. Proper pronunciation of syllables and words according to their different derivations, alphabetically digested with exact rules for the right division of words from two to seven syllables, III. The art of fair and fast writing with cautious copies to write and walk by, alphabetically composed, IV. Short rules of arithmetick easily attained by the meanest capacity and retained by the weakest memory. All these adorned with variety of copper cuts, together with significant comparisions, proverbs, sentences, poems, prayers, graces."
Reproduction of original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
English language -- Study and teaching.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A34154.0001.001

Contents
title page
engraved title page
To all Lovers of Religion, Loyalty & Learning: Health, Peace, and Prosperity.
TO THE Judicious and Generous READER.
THE COMPENDIOUS Schoolmaster, &c.
Of Syllables, and Words of One Syllable.
Examples of Words of One Syllable.
Sundry short exact Rules for dividing Words of Two Syllables, with a pleasant Variety of pertinent Ex∣amples to each Rule, never to be forgotten.
But as there is no General Rule but may be liable to some Exception, so the foregoing Rule is here contradicted in sundry Words wherein a Consonant placed in the middle of a Word between two Vowels is not always joined to the later Vowel, as in the former Examples, but sometimes to the former Vowel, as in the following Examples is to be observed.
Thirdly, When two like Consonants come together in the middle of a Word between two Vowels, they are to be divided, as in the following Examples is ever to be observed.
When two unlike Consonants come together in the middle of a Word between two Vowels, they are ever to be divided, as in the following Examples is plainly and particularly expressed.
Lastly, Note, That when three or four Consonants come together in the middle of a Word between two Vowels, they are so to be divided as may best express the proper sound of the Word, for which there is no particular Rule to be prescribed, but the Reader's own Observation must direct him, for whom I have muster'd up the following Ex∣amples.
Words of Three Syllables divided.
Of Words of Four Syllables.
Words of Five Syllables.
Words of Six and Seven Syllables.
Proper Names of Three, Four, and Five Syllables.
The LORD's Prayer.
The Apostolick Creed.
The Ten Commandments.
The First Chapter of St. Matthew.
CHAP. I. Of Proper Christian Names.
CHAP. II. Of Words of the same Orthography, and Sound, but different signification, Alpha∣betically reduced to pleasant Discourses, for the Pleasure and Profit of the Studious In∣genious Reader.
CHAP. III. Of Words of the same sound, but dif-fer-ent sense and spel-ling, shew-ing the Sig-ni-fi-can-cy and E-le-gan-cy of the Eng-lish Tongue. Al-pha-be-ti-cal-ly di-gest-ed.
Pi-thy Pro-ver-bi-al Say-ings, col-lect-ed from the Au-then-tick Wri-tings of Lear-ned Wor-thies of se-ve-ral Na-ti-ons; with the Au-thors Am-pli-fi-ca-ti-on, wor-thy the Rea-ders Ob-ser-va-ti-on, Al-pha-be-ti-cal-ly di-gest-ed.
A-pho-risms, or Se-lect Sen-ten-ces Mo-ral and Di-vine, wor-thy of Ob-ser-va-ti-on.
Rules for Grace-ful Reading.
CHAP. IV.
Copies Alphabetically composed for the Instruction and Observation of Boys and Men.
Numeration Table.
Addition.
A General Rule.
Addition of Money.
Subtraction.
Subtraction of Money.
Multiplication Table.
Multiplication.
A Second Example.
A Compassionate Sigh for Londons dismal Conflagration, On the Authors amazing view of those devouring Flames, that laid London's Glory in the Dust, Sept. 4. 1666.
A Cordial Congratulation of London's Glori∣ous Resurrection, from the late dreadful Conflagration, on the Authors view of the Superlative Splendor of that Famous City, May 29. 1683.
The Scho-lars Pray-er for the Morn-ing.
The Scho-lars E-ven-ing Pray-er.
A short Pray-er, or Grace be-fore Meat.
A Thanks-gi-ving af-ter Meat.
Be-fore Meat.
Af-ter Meat.