For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: Boyle, Robert, 1627-1691.
Title: The works of the Honourable Robert Boyle, Esq., epitomiz'd by Richard Boulton ... ; illustrated with copper plates.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further information or permissions.

Print source: The works of the Honourable Robert Boyle, Esq., epitomiz'd by Richard Boulton ... ; illustrated with copper plates.
Boyle, Robert, 1627-1691., Boulton, Richard, b. 1676 or 7.

London: Printed for J. Phillips ... and J. Taylor ..., 1699-1700.
Alternate titles: Works. 1699
Notes:
Vol. 4 has imprint: London : Printed, and are to be sold by T. Bennet and J. Wyat, 1700.
Vol. 4 contains: A general idea of the epitomy of the works of Robert Boyle, Esq.; to which are added, General heads for the natural history of a country / by R. Boulton. London, 1700. 2 p.l., 122 p.
Reproduction of original in British Library.
Includes indexes.
Imperfect: vol. 4 lacking in filmed copy.
Subject terms:
Physics -- Early works to 1800.
Chemistry -- Early works to 1800.
Medicine -- 15th-18th centuries.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A28936.0001.001

Contents
frontispiece
title page
imprimatur
ERRATA.
dedication
TO THE Right Reverend Father in GOD NICOLAS, Lord BISHOP of CHESTER.
plates
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE, Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. Considerations and Experiments concerning the Origin of Forms and Qualities.
An Excursion about the Relative Nature of Physical Qualities.
Of the Nature of a Form.
Of Generation, Corruption, and Alteration.
CHAP. II. Further Considerations concerning Particular Qualities.
CHAP. III. Of the Origin of Forms.
CHAP. IV. Considerations concerning Subordinate Forms. as they are usually held by several Learned Modern Philosophers.
CHAP. V. Experiments and Thoughts about the Pro∣duction and Reproduction of Forms.
CHAP. VI. Doubts and Experiments, concerning the Cu∣rious Figures of Salts.
CHAP. VII. Experimental Attempts concerning the Re∣dintegration of Bodies.
CHAP. VIII. Experiments concerning the Origin of Qua∣lities and Forms.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
OBSERVATION III.
OBSERVATION IV.
CHAP. IX. A Continuation of Experiments concerning Forms and Qualities.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT. VII.
EXPERIMENT. VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
CHAP. X. An Experiment, with some Considerations touching the differing Parts and Redin∣tegration of Salt-Petre.
CHAP. XI. Containing the History of Fluidity.
CHAP. XII. Experiments concerning the Superficial Fi∣gures of Fluids. Especially of Liquors Contiguous to other Liquors.
EXPERIMENT I. and II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENTS XVII, and XVIII.
EXPERIMENT XIX.
EXPERIMENT XX.
EXPERIMENT XXI.
EXPERIMENT XXII.
EXPERIMENT XXIII.
CHAP. XIII. Containing the History of Firmness.
CHAP. XIV. An Essay of the Intestine Motions of the Particles of Quiescent Solids.
CHAP. XV. Of the great Effects of even Languid and unheeded Local Motion.
I.Men are wont to overlook the great Efficacy of Celerity, in Bodies which are very small: And especially, if the Space which they move through be but small.
II.We are inclin'd to think, That the insen∣sible Motion of so soft Bodies as Fluids, can scarce have any sensible Operation on solid Bo∣dies.
III. Tho' the Number of Insensible Parts of Matter put into Motion, enable them to perform several things, yet they are usually slighted because invisible.
CHAP. XVI. Of the Propagable Nature of Motion.
IV. It is usually not sufficiently taken Notice of, how Local Motion may be propagated through several Mediums, and even Solid Bodies.
V. The Effects of the Particular Modifications of the Invisible Motions of Fluids, on Animal Bodies dispos'd to be work'd upon by them, are not usually sufficiently noted.
VI. Men do not consider the Effects of Fluids upon Inanimate Bodies, upon the Account of a Particular Texture andModification of the Agent, and the Patient.
VII. Some Bodies are thought to have their Parts in an Absolute Rest, when they are only in a state of Tension, or Compression.
VIII. The Reasons why Languid Local Motion, and it's Effects, are so much overlook'd, is, be∣cause we are too apt to take notice only of the Visible Impressions of one Body against ano∣without observing the Intestin Motions of Mi∣nute Parts.
CHAP. XVII. A Supplement to the former Chapter of the Great Effects of Languid, and Unheeded Local Motion.
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE, Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. Of the Systematical, or Cosmical Qualities of Things.
CHAP. II. Of Cosmical Suspicions.
CHAP. III. Of the Temperature of Subterraneal Regi∣ons as to Heat and Cold.
PROPOSITION I.
PROPOSITION II.
CHAP. IV. Of the Temperature of the Submarine Re∣gions, as to Heat and Cold.
CHAP. V. Relations about the Bottom of the Sea.
CHAP. VI. Further Relations about the Bottom of the Sea.
CHAP. VII. Observations and Experiments about the Salt∣ness of the SEA.
CHAP. VIII. Memoirs for the Natural History of Mineral Waters.
CHAP. IX. Titles propos'd for the Natural History of Mineral VVaters, consider'd whilst in their proper Channel.
CHAP. X. Containing Titles for the Natural History of Mineral Waters when drawn out of their Receptacles.
CHAP. XI. Titles for the Natural History of Mineral-Waters, consider'd as a Medicine.
CHAP. XII. Of the Natural and Preternatural States of Bodies; especially the Air.
CHAP. XIII. The Description of the Pneumatick Engin, and it's Use. Physico-Mechanical Expe∣riments touching the Air, in a Letter to the Right Honourable Charles, Lord Vis∣count of Dangarvan.
EXPERIMENT I. The Manner of Pumping out the Air. A Digres∣sion concerning the Spring and Elasticity of the Air, in Order to a more clear Apprehension of subsequent Experiments.
EXPERIMENT II. Of the Pressure of the Air against the Sides of the Bodies it encompasses. The Pressure of the Air in∣cluded within an Ambient Body explain'd.
EXPERIMENT II. Concerning the Force requisite to draw down the Sucker: The Opinion of a Modern Naturalist examin'd.
EXPERIMENT IV. Concerning the Swelling of a Bladder, The Opi∣nion of a Learned Author Examin'd.
EXPERIMENT V. Concerning a Bladder which burst in the Re∣ceiver, and another by Heat.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII. What Figure best resists the Pressure of the AIR.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX. A Confirmation of the former Experiment: An Ex∣periment to shew that these Phaenomena exhibited in Vacuo Boyliano proceed not from a fuga Va∣cui, &c.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI. Concerning the Burning of Coals, and the Continu∣ance of the Heat of a piece of Iron in Vacuo Boyliano.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII
EXPERIMENT XIV. Of the Striking of Fire, and Explosion of Gun∣powder in Vacuo Boyliano.
EXPERIMENT XV. The Ʋnusefulness of Kindling Bodies inclos'd in Va∣cuo Boyliano, with a Burning-Glass.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT XVII. The Gravity and Rarefaction of the Air examin'd, by the Torrecellian Experiments; together with Considerations concerning a Vacuum, &c.
EXPERIEMINT XVIII. The Variation of the Rise of the Mercury in the Glass-Cylinder, and the Reason of it consider'd.
EXPERIMENT XIX.
EXPERIMENT XX.
EXPERIMENT XXI.
EXPERIMENT XXII. The Bubbles prov'd to be Aerious, and not Watery, by observing the like Bubbles in î Mercury: To which is subjoyn'd a Digression, whether the Air is ge∣nerated de Novo, &c.
EXPERIMENT XXIII.
EXPERIMENT XXIV.
EXPERIMENT XXV.
EXPERIMENT XXVI.
EXPERIMENT XXVII.
EXPERIMENT XXVIII.
EXPERIMENT XXIX.
EXPERIMENT XXX.
EXPERIMENT XXXI.
EXPERIMENT XXXII.
EXPERIMENT XXXIII. Concerning the Pressure of the Air against the lower superficies of the Sucker, what Weight will draw it down, and how much it is able to raise. A Discourse concerning the Nature of Suction, &c.
EXPERIMENT XXXIV.
EXPERIMENT XXXV. Of the Cause of Filtration, and the Rising of Wa∣ter in the Syphons, &c.
EXPERIMENT XXXVI. The Weight of Air in the Exhausted Receiver. The subtle penetrating Power of some Spirits above that of the Air. The Cause why Air will not enter the Pores of some Bodies which Water will. The Weight of the Air, examin'd by an Aeolipile. The Proportion betwixt the Gravity of Air and Water: Betwixt Water and Quicksilver. Con∣jectures concerning the Weight of the Atmo∣sphere.
EXPERIMENT XXXVII. Concerning Flashes of Light in the Receiver.
EXPERIMENT XXXVIII.
EXPERIMENT XXXIX.
EXPERIMENT XL.
EXPERIMENT XLI.
A Digression containing some Doubts touching Respiration.
EXPERIEMINT XLII.
EXPERIMENT XLIII.
CHAP. XIV. The Doctrin of the Spring and Weight of the Air defended against Franciscus Li∣nus.
CHAP. XV. The Funicular Hypothesis Examin'd.
CHAP. XVI. A Continuation of Objections against the Funicular Hypothesis.
CHAP. XVII. The Aristotelian Rarefaction Examined.
CHAP. XVIII. A Consideration concerning some Tryals of the Torrecellian and other Experiments' at the Tops and Feet of a Hill.
CHAP. XIX. Experiments concerning the Measure of the Force of the Spring of Air, compress'd and dilated.
CHAP. XX. Objections against Particular Phaenomena answered.
CHAP. XXI. An Explication of Rarefaction.
CHAP. XXII. An Explication of the Rota Aristotelica.
CHAP. XXIII. An Abstract of what is further contain'd re∣lating to the Weight and Spring of the Air in the Examen of Mr. Hobbs his Dialo∣gus Physicus.
CHAP XXIV. The VVeight and Spring of the Air asserted.
CHAP. XXV. Mr. Hobb's Principal Explications of the Phaenomena of the Engin Examin'd
CHAP. XXVI. Several scatter'd Explications, and Passages in his Dialogue, consider'd.
CHAP. XXVII: Several other Passages in Mr. Hobbs's Dia∣logue, examined.
CHAP. XXVIII. What Mr. Hobbs teaches concerning Fluidity and Firmness, examin'd.
CHAP. XXIX. An Explanation of the Engin made Use of in the following Experiments.
CHAP. XXX. A Continuation of New Experiments concern∣ing the Spring and Weight of the Air and their Effects, by way of Letter to the Right Honourable the Lord Clifford and Dungarvan.
EXPERIMENT I. Concerning the Raising of Mercury a great Height in an open Tube, by the Spring of a small Quan∣tity of included Air.
EXPERIMENT II. A good Quantity of Air raised the Mercury in an open Tube, no higher than the Weight of the At∣mosphere does in a Baroscope.
EXPERIMENT III. The Spring of the included Air, will elevate Mer∣cury almost to an equal Height in Tubes of a diffe∣rent Bore.
EXPERIMENT IV. A new Hydraulo-Pneumatical Fountain made by the Spring of uncompress'd Air.
EXPERIMENT V. About the Production of Heat by Attrtion in the exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT VI. About the disjoyning of two Marbles (not other∣wise to be separated without a considerable Weight) upon a Removal of the Pressure of the Air in the Receiver.
EXPERIMENT VII. A way to break Flat Glass speedily, by the Weight of the Atmosphere.
EXPERIMENT VIII. The breaking of the Glass Plates in the foregoing Experiment may be accounted for without a Fuga Vacui.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X. A Considerable Weight rais'd by the Spring of the Air included in a Bladder.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII. Tryals representing the Force of the Spring of Ʋncom∣press'd Air upon Staple Bodies.
The I. TRYAL.
The II. TRYAL.
The III. TRYAL.
EXPERIMENT XIII. Suction is able to raise Mercury no highier in Pipes than the Weight of the Atmosphere impels it.
ANNOTATION.
EXPERIMENT XIV. The different Heights to which the Liquors may be elevated by Suction, accordingly as their Specifick Gravity varies.
EXPERIMENT XV. To what Heights Water and Mercury may be rais'd proportionably to their Specifick Gravities.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT XVII.
EXPERIMENT XVIII. About the Bending of a Springy Body, in the Ex∣hausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT XIX. Concerning the making of Mercurial Gauges, where∣by to estimate how much the Receiver is ex∣hausted.
EXPERIMENT XX. An easie way to make the Pressure of the Air sensi∣ble to the Touch.
EXPERIMENT XXI, About the subsiding of Mercury in the Tube of the Torrecellian Experiment, to the Level with the Superficies of the Stagnant Mercury.
EXPERIMENT XXII. In Tubes open at both Ends, when Nature's Abhor∣rency of a Vacuum cannot be pretended, the Weight of Water will impell Quicksilver no higher in slender than in larger Pipes.
The I. TRYAL.
The II. TRIAL.
EXPERIMENT XXIII. At what Height Mercury Amalgamated with Tin, as well as pure Mercury, will be suspended.
EXPERIMENT XXIV. A Method of making Barometers, which may be carried to distant Countries.
EXPERIMENT XXV. What Height the Mercury in Barometers will be suspended at, at the Top of Hills. Some Obser∣vations of the Height of Mountains, especially, the Pic of Teneriff.
An Appendix about the Height of Mountains.
EXPERIMENT XXVI. The Pressure of the Atmosphere may be able to keep up the Mercury in the Torrecellian Experiment, tho' the Air presses upon it, at a very small Orifice.
EXPERIMENT XXVII. An Oblique Pressure of the Atmosphere may be suffi∣cient to keep up the Mercury at the usual Height, in the Torrecellain Experiment, and the Spring of a small quantity of Air may do the same.
EXPERIMENT XXVIII.
EXPERIMENT XXIX. The Ascension of Liquors in very slender Pipes, in an Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT XXX. When the Pressure of the External Air is taken off, it is very easy to draw up the Sucker of a Syringe, tho' the Hole at which the Water should succeed, be stopp'd.
The I. TRYAL.
The II. TRYAL.
EXPERIMENT XXXI. About the opening of a Syringe, whose Pipe was stopp'd in the exhausted Receiver, and by the help of it, making the Pressure of the Air lift up a conside∣rable Weight.
EXPERIMENT XXXII. The Sticking of Cupping Glasses depends on the Pressure of the Air.
EXPERIMENT XXXIII.
EXPERIMENT XXXIV. Bellows whose Nose is very well stopp'd, will open of their own accord, when the Pressure of the Exter∣nal Air is taken off.
EXPERIMENT XXXV. An Attempt to examin the Motions and Sensibility of the Cartesian Materia Subtilis, or the Aether, with a Pair of Bellows, which were made of a Bladder, in the exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT XXXVI. The great and seeming Spontaneous Ascent of Water, in a Pipe filled with a Compact Body, whose Par∣ticles are thought incapable of imbibing it.
EXPERIMENT XXXVII. Of the seeming spontaneous Ascent of Salts, along the sides of Glasses, with a Conjecture at the Cause of it.
EXPERIMENT XXXVIII. An Attempt to measure the Gravity of Cylinders of the Atmosphere, so that it may be known and express'd by common Weights.
EXPERIMENT XXXIX. The Attractive Virtue of a Load-Stone in the Ex∣hausted Receiver.
ADVERTISEMENT.
The TABLE.
ADVERTISEMENT.
imprimatur
title page
To His Excellency The Most Illustrious PRINCE, CHARLES Duke of BOLTON, Marquiss of Winchester, Earl of Wilt∣shire, and Baron St. John of Basing; the Premier Marquiss of England; one of the Lords Justices of the King∣dom of Ireland; Lord Lieutenant and Custos Rotulorum for the Countys of Dorset and Southampton, the Town of Southampton and County of the same; Vice-Admiral of Southampton and the Isle of Wight; Lord Warden of the New Forest in Hantshire, and one of the Lords of His Majesty's most Honourable Privy-Council.
THE PREFACE TO THE READER.
plates
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. Experiments touching the Spring and Weight of the Air, &c.
EXPERIMENT I. The Cause of the Ascension of Liquors in Syringes is to be derived from the Pressure of the Air.
TRYAL I.
TRYAL II. Being a Prosecution of the former.
EXPERIMENT II. An Attempt to discover the Motion of Aether in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT III. Concerning the falling of a light Body in the Ex∣hausted Receiver, the Figure of it disposing it's Mo∣tion to be visibly alter'd by a small Resistance of the Air.
EXPERIMENT IV. Of the Propagation of Sounds in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT V. About the breaking of a Glass Drop in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT VI. About the Production of Light in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT VII. The Production of a kind of Halo, and several Co∣lours in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT VIII. About the slacking of Quick-lime in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT IX. An attempt to measure the force of the Spring of included Air, and examine a Conjecture about the difference of it's strength in unequally broad-mouthed Glasses.
EXPERIMENT X. An easie way of making a small Quantity of In∣cluded Air raise 50 or 60 Pound or a greater Weight in the Exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT XI.
CHAP. II. A second Continuation of Physico-Mechani∣cal Experiments.
PLATE III. A Description of the Engin with a double Tube to exhaust the Air.
PLATE IV. A description of the Mercurial Gage made use of in the following Experiment.
A Description of the Engin made to compress Air.
PLATE IV. How Mixtures may be made in compressed Air.
PLATE IV. A Description of a Wind-Gun.
PLATE V. How Factitious Air may pass out of one Re∣ceiver into another.
PLATE VI. An Instrument by which Air may be filtrated through Water.
FIGƲRE III. How the same Numerical Air may be sometimes condensed, and sometimes rarified.
PLATE VII. An Instrument to distil in Vacuo,
Another Instrument for the same Ʋse with the former.
CHAP. III.
ARTICLE. I. Several Ways to help the Production of the Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
ARTICLE II. Several ways to hinder the Production of Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
ARTICLE III. The Effects of Artificial Air, are different from the Effects of common Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
ARTICLE IV. The Effects of Air compress'd, different from the Effects of Common Air.
EXPERIMENT I,
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT XVIII.
ARTICLE V. The Effects of Artificial Air upon Animals.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
ARTICLE VI. Animals in Vacuo.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
ARTICLE VII. Fire in Compress'd Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
ARTICLE VIII. Fire us'd to produce Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
ARTICLE IX. Concerning the Production of Air in Vacuo.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT XVII.
ARTICLE X. Concerning the Production of Air above it's wonted Pressure.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
ARTICLE XI. Various Experiments.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT XVII.
EXPERIMENT XVIII.
EXPERIMENT XIX.
EXPERIMENT XX.
EXPERIMENT XXI.
ARTICLE XII. Artificial Air destroy'd.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
ARTICLE XIII. Experiments concerning the different Cele∣rity of Air produc'd in Vacuo, or in Com∣mon Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
ARTICLE XIV.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
ARTICLE XV. Air is sometimes found unfit to produce Mouldiness.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
ARTICLE XVI. Experiments concerning the Change of Weight, made in the Beams of the Sun, even in Vessels seal'd Hermetically.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT I.
ARTICLE XVII. The Preservation of Bodies in Compress'd Liquors.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT. XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPEREMENT XV.
EXPEREMENT XVI.
EXPEREMENT XVII.
EXPERIMENT XVIII.
EXPERIMENT XIX.
EXPERIMENT XX.
EXPERIMENT XXI.
EXPERIMENT XXII.
ARTICLE XVIII. Experiments concerning Elixation and Distil∣lation in Vacuo.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
ARTICLE XIX. Concerning Elixation in Vessels stopp'd with Screws, by whose help, Harts-horn and the Bones of Fishes and four-footed Crea∣tures may be soften'd.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
CHAP. IV. New Experiments about the Preservation of Bodies in Vacuo Boyliano.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
POSSCRIPT.
CHAP. V. New Pneumatical Experiments about Re∣spiration, upon Ducks, Vipers, Frogs, &c. communicated in the Philosophical Transactions of August the 8th and Sep∣tember the 12th 1670. contain'd under the following Titles.
TITLE I. Observations made about the lasting of Ducks included in the exhaust'd Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
TITLE II. Of the Phenomena afforded by Vipers, in∣cluded in an exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
TITLE III. Phaenomena afforded by Frogs in an exhaust-Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
TITLE IV. Of the Phaenomena afforded by a newly kit∣ten'd Kitling in Vacuo.
TITLE V. Some Tryals about the Air, usually harbour'd in the Pores of VVater, &c.
TITLE VI. Of some Phaenomena, afforded by Shell-Fishes in an exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
TITLE VII. Of the Phaenomena of a Scale Fish, in an exhausted Receiver.
TITLE VIII. Of two Animals included, with large Wounds in the Abdomen, in the Pneumatical Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
TITLE IX. Of the Motion of the separated Heart of a cold Animal in the exhausted Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
TITLE X. A Comparison of Times, wherein Animals may be kill'd by drowning, or withdrawing of the Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
TITLE XI. Of the Accidents that happen'd to Animals in Air brought to a Considerable Degree, but not near the utmost one of Rarefaction.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
TITLE XII. Of the Observations produc'd in an Ani∣mal in Changes, as to Rarity and Density, made in the same Air.
TITLE XIII. Of an unsuccessful Attempt to prevent the Necessity of Respiration, by the Producti∣on or Growth of Animals in our Receiver.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
TITLE XIV. Of the Power of Custom to enable Animals to hold out in Air too much Rarified for Respiration.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
TITLE XV. Some Experiments shewing, that Air, become unfit for Respiration, may retain it's wonted Pressure.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
TITLE VI. Of the Use of the Air to elevate Steams of Bodies.
TITLE XVII. Of the long Continuance of a Slow-worm, and a Leech alive in the Vacuum made by our Engin.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
TITLE XVIII. Of what happen'd to some Creeping Insects in our Vacum.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
TITLE XIX. Of the Phaenomena suggested by Winged Insects in our Vacum.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
TITLE XX. Of the Necessity of Air to the Motion of such small Creatures as Ants and even Mites themselves.
CHAP. VI. The most Considerable Animadversions on Mr. Hobbs's Problemata de Vacuo.
CHAP. VII. The Cause of Attraction by Suction.
CHAP. VIII. Some Observations and Directions about the Barometer, communicated by Mr. Boyle, in the Phil. Transact. of April 1666.
CHP. IX. An Account of a new kind of Baroseope which may be call'd Statical: communicated in the Phi∣losophical Transactions of July 2. 1666.
CHAP. X. A Discovery of the Admirable Rarefaction of the Air, even without Heat.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
CHAP. XI. New Observations about the Duration of the Spring of Expanded Air.
CHAP. XII. New Experiments touching the Condensation of the Air by mere Cold, and it's Com∣pression without Mechanichal Engins.
CHAP. XI. Of the Admirably differing Extension of the same Quantity of Air rarified and compress'd.
CHAP. XII. New Experiments about the weakned Spring, and unheeded Effects of the Air, com∣municated in the Philos. Transact. of Decemb. 75.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
CHAP. XIII. A Statical Hygroscope propos'd to the Se∣cretary of the Royal Society.
CHAP. XIV. A Brief Account of the Utilities of Hy∣groscopes,
ƲSE I. To know the differing Variations of Weather in the same Month, Day and Hour.
ƲSE II. To know how much one Year or Season is dryer or moister than another.
ƲSE III. To discover and compare the Changes of the Tem∣perature of the Air made by Winds strong or weak; frosty, snowy and other Weather.
ƲSE IV. To compare the Temperature of differing Houses, and differing Rooms in the same House.
ƲSE V.
ƲSE VI. To keep a Chamber at the same Degree, or an assigned Degree of Dryness.
CHAP. XVIII. A new Experiment and other Instances of the Efficacy of the Air's Moisture.
CHAP XIX. Of some unheeded Causes of the Insalubrity and Salubrity of the Air, &c.
PROPOSITION I.
PROPOSITION II. It is probable, that in divers Places some Ende∣mical Diseases do chiefly or partly depend on subterraneal Steams.
PROPOSITION III. It is likely, that divers Epidemical Diseases are in great Part produc'd by Subterra∣neal Effluvia.
PROPOSITION IV. It is very probable, that most of the Diseases, that even Physitians call new Ones, are caus'd either chiefly or concurrently by Subterraneal Steams.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
CHAP. XX. Suspicions about some hidden Qualities of the Air.
CHAP. XXI. Some Additional Experiments relating to Suspicions about the Hidden Qualities of the Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
CHAP. XXII. Of the Celestial and Aerial Magnets.
CHAP. XXIII. Experiments and Notes about the Mechani∣cal Production of Magnetical Qualities.
CHAP. XXIV. Chymico-Magnetical Experiments and Observations.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III. & IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
CHAP. XXV. Experiments and Notes about the Mechani∣nal Origin and Production of Electricity.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
CHAP. XXVI. The General History of the Air begun.
TITLE I.
TITLE II. Of the constant and permanent Ingredients of the Air.
TITLE III Of the Aether in the Atmosphere.
TITTLE V. Of the Magnetical Particles in the Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
TITLE VII. Of the Accidental or less constant Ingredients of the Air. TITLE VIII. Of Aqueous Particles in the Air, and of it's Moisture and Dryness.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
TITLE IX. Of Clouds, Mists and Fogs.
TITLE X: Of Terrestrial Steams in the Air.
TITLE XI. Of Salts in the Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPEREMENT. IV.
TITLE XII. Of Sulphur and Inflammable Particles in the Air; and of Lightning, and it's Effect.
TITLE XIII. Of Electrical Influences or Effluviums in the Air.
TITLE XIV. Of the Height of the Atmosphere. TITLE XV. Of the Motion of Air, and of Winds.
TITLE XVI. Of the Air as the Medium of Sounds, and of Sounds and Noises in the Air, and Par∣ticularly Thunder; and of the Airs Ope∣ration on the Sounds of Bodies.
TITLE XVII. Of the Weight of the Air
An Experiment made at the Spire of the Ca∣thedral Church in Sarum.
An Extract of a Letter writ to the Au∣thor, by the Ingenious Author of that most incomparable Essay of Human Un∣derstanding Mr. Lock, Dated Ch. Ch. May 5th 1666.
Mr. Pascal in his small Tract, either De∣la Pesanteur de l'Air; or in that Del'Equilibre des liqueurs.
TITLE XVIII. Of the Consistency of the Air; it's Rarity, Density, Fludity, Subtily.
TITLE XIX. Of the Heat and Coldness of the Air.
An Exact Relation of the Pico Teneriff.
TITTLE XX. Of the Air in Reference to Light, it's Perspicuity, Opacity, Reflections, Refra∣ctions, Colours, Light and Lightnings.
TITLE XXI. Of the Operation of the Air on the Consisten∣cy of Animal Substances.
TITLE XXII. Of the Operation of the Air on the Consistency of vegetable Substances.
TITLE XXIII. Of the Operation of the Air on consistent mi∣neral Substances.
TITLE XXIV. Of the Air in reference to Fire and Flame.
Experiments touching the Relation betwixt Flame and Air.
TITLE XXV. Of the Air in reference to Fermentation.
TITLE XXVI. Of the Air as the Receptacle of Odours. TITLE XXVII. Of the Operation of the Air on the Odours of Animal Substances.
TITLE XXVIII. Of the Operation of the Air on the Odours of vegetable Substances.
TITLE XXIX. Of the Operations of Air on the Odours of Mineral Substances. TITLE XXX. Of the Operation of Air on the Tastes of Animal Substances.
TITLE XXXI. Of the Operation of Air on the Tastes of Vegetable Substances. TITLE XXXII. Of the Operation of the Air on the Tastes of Mineral Substances. TITLE XXXIII. Of the Operation of the Air on the Colours of Animal Substances.
TITLE XXXIV. Of the Operation of the Air on the Co∣lours of Vegetable Substances.
TITLE XXXV. Of the Operation of the Air on Mineral Substances.
TITLE XXXVI. Of the Air destroying or introducing other less obvious Qualities into Animal Sub∣stances. TITLE XXXVII. Of the Air destroying or introducing other less obvious Qualities into Vegetable Sub∣stances.
TITLE XXXVIII. Of the Air destroying or introducing other less obvious Qualities into Mineral Sub∣stances.
TITLE XXIX. Of the Air in reference to the Propagation and Vegetation of Plants.
TITLE XL. Of the Effects of the Air in Reference to the Generation, Life and Health of A∣nimals.
TITLE XLI. Of Heavy Bodies sustained in, or taken up into the Air. TITLE XLII. Of Dew. TITLE XLIII. Of Rain.
TITLE XLIV. Of Hail.
TITLE XLV. Of Snow.
TITLE XLVII.
TITLE XLVIII.
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. Experiments and Observations about the Me∣chanical Production of Tastes.
EXPERIMENT I. To divide a Body almost Insipid, in two Bodies of very strong and very different Tastes
EXPERIMENT II. Of two Bodies, The one highly Acid and Corro∣sive, and the other Alkalizate and Fiery, to produce a Body almost insipid.
EXPERIMENT III. Of two Bodies, the one very bitter, and the other extremely salt, to make an insipid Substance.
PROPOSITION IV. Of two Bodies, the one very sweet, and the other salter than Brine, to obtain an insipid Mixture.
EXPERIMENT V. Of an Insipid and Soure one, to make a Substance more bitter than Aloes.
EXPERIMENT VI. Of an insipid Body and a highly corrosive one, to make a Substance as sweet as Sugar.
EXPERIMENT VII. Of obtaining without Addition from the sweetest Bodies, Liquors corrosive enough to dissolve Bodies.
EXPERIMENT VIII. To divide a Body, bitter in the highest Degree, into two Substances, the one extremely sowre, and the other perfectly insipid.
EXPERIMENT IX. To produce Variety of Tastes in one insipid Body, by associating it with divers Menstruums.
EXPERIMENT X. To produce Variety of Tastes with one Memstru∣um, by associating it with insipid Bodies.
EXPERIMENT XI. Of two Liquors, the one highly corrosive, and the other very pungent and not pleasant, to compose a Body of a pleasant and Aromatick Taste.
EXPERIMENT XII. To imitate by Art, and sometimes even in Mine∣rals, the peculiar Tastes of natural Bodies, and even Vegetables.
A short Excursion about some Changes of Tastes made by Maturation.
CHAP. II. Experiments and Observations concerning the Mechanical Production of Odours.
EXPERIMENT I. With two Bodies, neither of them odorous, to produce immediately a strong Ʋrinous Smell.
EXPERIMENT II. By the bare Addition of common Water, to pro∣duce immediately a very strong Smell, in a Bo∣dy that had no such before.
EXPERIMENT III. Of producing some Odours, each of them quite dif∣ferent from that of any of the Ingredients.
EXPERIMENT. IV. Of the Production of some Odours by local Motion.
EXPERIMENT V. By mixing a good Proportion of a very strong scented Body, with an inodorous one, to deprive it speedily of all it's umell.
EXPERIMENT VI. By putting a very strong stinking Body to another of a Smell not sweet, to produce a Mixture of a pleasant and strongly Aromatick Odours.
EXPERIMENT VII. By digesting two Bodies, neither of them well scented, to produce Bodies of a very subtle and strong fragrant Odour.
EXPERIMENT VIII. By the bare Addition of a Body almost inodorous, and not well scented, to give a pleasant and aro∣matick Smell to Spirit of Wine.
EXPERIMENT IX. To make the foremention'd fragrant Body, without Addition of fire, degenerate into the rank Smell of Garliek.
EXPEEIMENT X. With an inodorous Body, and another not well scen∣ted, to produce a Musky Smell.
EXPERIMENT XI. With fixed Metals, and Bodies either inodorous or stinking, to produce strong and pleasant Smells, like those of some Vegetables and Minerals.
EXPERIMENT XII. To heighten good Smells by Composition.
CHAP. III. Many Changes of Colour produced by one simple Ingredient.
CHAP. IV. An Experimental History of COLOURS begun.
Containing Part the First.
CHAP. V. Of the Nature of Whiteness and Blackness. Part. II. Of the Experimental History of Colours.
CHAP. VI. Experiments in Consort, concerning Whit∣ness ond Blackness.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
CHAP. VII. Containing promiscuous Experiments about Colours, being the Third Part of the Ex∣perimental History of Colours.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT. IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
A Corollary of the Tenth Experiment.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT XVII.
EXPERIMENT XVIII.
EXPERIMENT XIX.
EXPERIMENT XX.
EXPERIMENT XXI.
EXPERIMENT XXII.
EXPERIMENT XXIII.
EXPERIMENT XXIV.
EXPERIMENT XXV.
EXPERIMENT XXVI.
EXPERIMENT XXVII.
EXPERIMENT XXVIII.
EXPERIMENT XXIX.
EXPERIMENT XXX.
EXPERIMENT XXXI
EXPERIMENT XXXII.
EXPERIMENT XXXIII.
EXPERIMENT XXXIV.
EXPERIMENT XXXV.
EXPERIMENT XXXVI.
EXPERIMENT XXXVII.
EXPERIMENT XXXVIII.
EXPERIMENT XXXIX.
EXPERIMENT XL.
An Improvement of the fortieth Experiment.
Reflections on the XL Experiment compar'd with the X and XX.
EXPERIMENT XLI.
EXPERIMENT XLII.
EXPERIMENT XLIII.
EXPERIMENT XLIV.
EXPERIMENT XLV.
EXPERIMENT XLVI.
EXPERIMENT XLVII.
EXPERIMENT XLVIII.
ANNOTATIONS.
EXPERIMENT XLIX.
ANNOTATIONS.
EXPERIMENT L.
Advertisement.
note about forthcoming volume
THE TABLE.
Books Printed for and sold by John Taylor at the Ship in St. Paul's Church-Yard.
imprimatur
title page
TO THE Most Illustrious Prince WILLIAM, Duke of Bedford, Marquiss of Tavi∣stock, Earl of Bedford, Baron Rus∣sel, and Baron Russel of Thorn∣haugh, Baron Howland of Streat∣ham; Lord Lieutenant of the Coun∣ties of Bedford and Cambridge, and during the Minority of Wrichesly, (commonly called Marquiss of Tavi∣stock) his Grandson and Heir appa∣rent, Lord Lieutenant of Middlesex; as also Custos Rotulorum for the said County and the Liberties of West∣minster; One of the Lords of his Ma∣jesty's most Honourable Privy Council, and Knight of the most Noble Order of the Garter.
THE PREFACE TO THE READER.
A Catalogue of Books Printed for J. Taylor, at the Ship in St. Paul's Church-Yard.
TO THE Learned and Ever Honoured HANS SLOANE M. D. FELLOW, OF THE Colledge of Physicians; AND SECRETARY TO THE Royal Society.
THE PREFACE To the READER.
THE INTRODUCTION, Representing the Grounds and Excellency of CORPUSCULAR PHILOSOPHI.
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE, Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. Of the Mechanical Production of Cold.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
A Digression about Potential Coldness.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
CHAP. II. Shewing, that not only our Senses, but com∣mon Weather-glasses, may misinform us a∣bout Cold.
CHAP. III. Containing some new Observations about the Deficiencies of Weather-glasses, together with some Considerations touching the new or Hermetical Thermometers.
CHAP. IV. Concerning the cause of the Condensation of the Air, and ascent of Water by Cold in common Weather-glasses.
CHAP. V. The Experimental History of Cold begun.
TITLE I. Experiments concerning Bodies capable of Freezing others.
TITLE II. Experiments and Observations concerning Bo∣dies disposed to be Frozen.
Appendix to the II. Title.
TITLE III. Experiments touching Bodies indisposed to be frozen.
TITLE IV. Experiments and Observations concerning the degrees of Cold in several Bodies.
TITLE V. Experiments concerning the Tendency of Cold upwards or downwards.
TITLE VI. Experiments and Observations concerning the preservation and destruction of (Eggs, Ap∣ples, and other) Bodies by Cold.
An Appendix to the VI. Title.
TITLE VII. Experiments concerning the Expansion of Wa∣ter, and Aqueous Liquors by freezing.
The Phaenomena of an Experiment about Freez∣ing referrable to the VII Title, read before the Royal Society.
TITLE VIII. Experiments concerning the Contraction of Liquors by Cold.
TITLE IX. Experiments concerning the Bubble from which the Levity of Ice is supposed to proceed.
TITLE X. Experiments about the Measure of the Expan∣sion and the Contraction of Liquors.
TITLE XI. Experiments touching the Expansive force of Freezing Water.
TITLE XII. Experiments concerning a new way of Esti∣mating the Expansive force of Congelation, and of highly compressing Air without En∣gines.
TITLE XIII. Experiments and Observations concerning the Sphere of Activity of Cold.
TITLE XIV. Experiments concerning the Different Medi∣ums through which Cold may be diffused.
TITLE XV. Experiments and Observations concerning Ice.
TITLE XVI. Experiments and Observations concerning the Duration of Ice and Snow, and the destroy∣ing of them by the Air and several Liquors.
An Appendix to the XVI Title.
TITLE XVII. Considerations and Experiments concerning the Primum frigidum.
TITLE XVIII. Experiments and Observations touching the Coldness and Temperature of the Air.
A Relation given me by an Ingenious Gentleman lately returned out of Poland.
A Passage taken out of the Czars-Doctor's Letter.
TITLE XIX. Of the strange Effects of Cold
TITLE XX. Experiments concerning the Weight of Bodies frozen and unfrozen.
TITLE XXI. Promiscuous Experiments and Observations concerning Cold.
One Particular referrable to the XXI Title.
To the XI Title.
An Appendix to the XVII Title.
Paralipomena to the II and XX Titles, of the frost getting into hard and solid Bodies.
Postcript.
Particulars referrable to several Titles.
CHAP. VI. An Examen of Antiperistasis, as it is usually taught and proved.
Postscript
CHAP. VII. An Examination of Mr. Hobbes Doctrine of Cold.
Postscript
CHAP. VIII. An account of Freezing made in December and January, 1662. By Dr. Merret.
CHAP. IX. A new Frigorifick Experiment, shewing how a considerable degree of Cold may be sud∣denly produced without the help of Snow, Ice, Hail, Wind, or Nitre, any time of the year; comunicated in the Trans∣actions of July 18. 1666.
CHAP. X. Of the positive and privative Nature of Cold.
CHAP. XI. Two Problems about Cold. An attempt to measure the great expansive force of freez∣ing Water: Of the Production of Cold by the conflict of Bodies appearing to make an Ebullition.
CHAP. XII. Of the Mechanical Origin or Production of Heat.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II, III, IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
EXPERIMENT XVI.
EXPERIMENT XVII.
EXPERIMENT XVIII.
EXPERIMENT XIX.
EXPERIMENT XX.
EXPERIMENT XXI.
EXPERIMENT XXII.
EXPERIMENT XXIII.
EXPERIMENT XXIV.
EXPERIMENT XXV.
EXPERIMENT XXVI.
EXPERIMENT XXVII.
EXPERIMENT XXVIII.
CHAP. XIII. Of Mercury growing hot with Gold, commu∣nicated in the Transactions of Feb. 21. 1675/6.
CHAP. XIV. New Experiments to make Fire and Flame ponderable.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III and IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI and VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX, X and XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV, XV and XXI.
EXPERIMENT XVI, XVII and XVIII.
EXPERIMENT XIX and XX.
CHAP. XV. Additional Experiments about arresting and weighing of igneous Corpuscles.
EXPERIMENT I and II.
EXPERIMENT III, IV, V.
EXPERIMENT VI and VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII and IX.
CHAP. XVI. A discovery of the Perviousness of Glass to ponderable Parts of Flame.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
COROLLARY I. Confirming the Parodox, That Flame may act as a Menstruum, and make Coalitions with the Bodies it works upon.
COROLLARY II. Proposing a Paradox about Calcination and Calces.
COROLLARY III.
COROLLARY IV.
CHAP. XVII. New Experiments touching the relation be∣twixt Flame and Air.
The I. TITLE. Of the dificulty of producing Flame without Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III and IV.
EXPERIMENT V and VI.
EXPERIMENT VII and VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
The II. TITLE. Of the difficulty of preserving Flame without Air.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
The III. TITLE. Of the difficult Propagation of actual Flame in Vacuo Boyliano.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III and IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
CHAP. XVIII. New Experiments about the relation betwixt Air and the Flamma Vitalis of Animals.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III, IV, and V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
CHAP. XIX. New Experiments about Explosions.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II and III.
CHAP. XX. New Experiments concerning the relation be∣twixt Light and Air, in shining-Wood, and Fishes. Communicated in the Trans∣actions of Jan. 6. 1667/8.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
CHAP. XXI. Observations and Tryals about the resemblan∣ces and Differences between a burning Coal and shining Wood. Communicated in the Transactions of Feb. 1667/8
CHAP. XXII. Some Observations about shining Flesh, com∣municated in the Transactions of De∣cember 16. 1672.
CHAP. XXIII. Observations of a Diamond that shines in the dark.
CHAP. XXIV. The Aerial Noctiluca, or some new Phaenome∣na; and a process of a Factitious self-shining substance.
CHAP. XXV. New Phenomena exhibited by an Icy Nocti∣luca, or a solid self-shining Substance; and first, some Qualities of the Noctilu∣ca it self.
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE, Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. New Experiments of the Positive or Relative Levity of Bodies under Water.
CHAP. II. New Experiments about the Pressure of the Air's Spring on Bodies under Water.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
CHAP. III. New Experiments concerning an effect of the varying weight of the Atmosphere upon some Bodies in the Water. Communicated in the Transactions of Feb. 24.1672/3.
CHAP. IV. New Experiments about the differing Pres∣sure of heavy Solids and Fluids.
EXPERIMENT I, II, and III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
CHAP. V. An Invention for estimating the Weight of Water in Water, with ordinary Ballances or Weights. Communicated in the Pub. Transact. of Aug. 16. 1669.
CHAP. VI. Hydrostatical Paradoxes made out by new Experiments.
PARADOX I. That in Water, and other Fluids, the lower Parts are pressed by the upper.
PARADOX II. That a lighter fluid may gravitate or weigh upon a heavier.
PARADOX III. That if a Body contiguous to the Water be alto∣gether or in Part lower than the highest level of the said Water, the lower part of the Body will be pressed upward by the Water that touches it beneath.
PARADOX IV. That in the ascension of Water in Pumps, &c. There needs nothing to raise the Water, but a competent weight of an external fluid.
PARADOX V. That the Pressure of an external fluid, is able to keep an Heterogeneous Liquor suspended at the same height in several Pipes, tho' those Pipes be of very different Diameters.
PARADOX VI. If a Body placed under Water, with its upper∣most Surface parallel to the Horrizon, how much Water soever there may be on this or that side above the Body, the direct Pressure sustained by the Body (for we now consider not the La∣teral or the recoiling Pressure, to which the Body may be exposed, if quite environed with Water) is no more than that of a Column of Water, having the Horizontal superficies of the Body for its Basis, and the Perpendicular depth of the Water for its height.
PARADOX VII. That a Body immersed in a fluid, sustains a Lateral Pressure from the fluid; and that in∣creased, as the depth of the immersed Body be∣low the Surface of the fluid increaseth.
PARADOX VIII. That Water may be made to depress a Body lighter than it self, as well as to buoy it up.
PARADOX IX. That whatever is said of Positive Levity, a par∣cel of Oyl lighter than Water may be kept in Wa∣ter, without ascending in it.
PARADOX X. That the Cause of the Ascension of Water in Sy∣phony, and of flowing through them, may be explained without having recourse to Nature's Abhorrency of a Vacuum.
PARADOX XI. That a Solid Body, as ponderous as any yet known, tho' near the top of the Water, it will sink by its own weight; yet if it be placed at a greater depth, than that of twenty times its own thick∣ness, it will not sink, if its descent be not as∣sisted by the weight of the incumbent Water.
APPENDIX I. Objections to evince that the upper Parts of Wa∣ter press not upon the lower, answered.
APPENDIX II. Why Divers, and others who descend to the bottom of the Sea, are not oppressed by the weight of the incumbent Water.
CHAP. VII. An Hydrostatical discourse &c.
CHAP. VIII. A new Essay Instrument, and the Hydro∣statical Principle it's founded on, &c. Communicated in the Transactions of June 1675.
The first Section. Shewing the occasion of making this Instrument, and the Hydrostatical Principle it's founded upon.
The second Section. Describing the Construction of this Instrument.
The third Section. Representing the uses of this Instrument, as re∣lating to Metals.
CHAP. IX. Observations of the growth and increase of Metals.
Postscript
CHAP. X. A Hydrostatical way of estimating Ores.
CHAP. XI. Medicina Hydrostatica.
CHAP. XII. Hydrostatical Stereometry applyed to the Ma∣teria Medica.
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE, Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. An account of a strangely Self-moving Li∣quor communicated in the Transactions of November 26. 1685.
CHAP. II. Of the preserving of Birds, and other small Faetus's.
CHAP. III. A Conjecture concerning the the Bladders, of Air found in Fishes. Communicated in the Transactions of May 25. 1675.
CHAP. IV. Laudanum Helmontii Junioris: Communi∣cated in the Philosophical Transactions of October 1674.
CHAP. V. Observations of an Earth-Quake made at Oxford, and communcated in the Trans∣actions of April 2. 1666.
CHAP. VI. Passages relating to the Art of Medicine.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
CHAP. VII. Experiments and Observations Solitary.
EXPERIMENT I. A notable Comminution of Gold into Powder, that will sink in Water.
EXPERIMENT II. A Proof of the Metalline Nature of Granates.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII. Remarkable Observations about Hurricanes.
EXPERIMENT VIII. A Monstrous Pearl.
EXPERIMENT IX. A strange Observation about the Influence of the Moon.
EXPERIMENT X. An uncommon Experiment about Heat and Cold.
CHAP. VIII. A Collection of Chymical Experiments.
EXPERIMENT I. To dissolve crude Gold with dry Bodies.
EXPERIMENT II. Luna Cornea by Distillation.
EXPERIMENT III. Mercury growing warm with Silver.
EXPERIMENT IV. The lasting Disposition of a certain preparation of Mercury to grow Hot with Gold.
EXPERIMENT V. An uncommon method of working upon Antimony.
EXPERIMENT VI. A method very uncommon of making a Calces of Gold.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX. To make an Inflamable Spirit of Roses.
EXPERIMENT X. About the Chymical Analysis of Pearls.
CHAP. IX. Of Strange Reports.
RELATION I.
RELATION II.
RELATION III.
RELATION IV.
RELATION V.
RELATION VI.
RELATION VII.
RELATION VIII.
RELATION IX.
RELATION X.
CHAP. X. Various Observations about Diamonds.
THE WORKS Of the HONOURABLE ROBERT BOYLE, Esq EPITOMIZED.
CHAP. I. Of the Original and Virtue of Gems.
CHAP. II. Containing a Conjecture about the Causes of the Virtues of Gems.
CHAP. III. Of the Atmospheres of Consistent Solids.
CHAP. IV. Of the Strange Subtlety of Effluviums.
CHAP. V. Of the great Efficacy of Effluviums.
CHAP. VI. Of the determinate Nature of Effluviums.
CHAP. VII. Of the Porousness of solid Bodies.
PROP. I. It's very probable, that Glass may be pierced into, at some distance, even by visible and tangible Bodies.
PROP. II. Common Glass is not ordinarily permeable by Chymical Liquors, tho' strong and subtle, nor by the directly visible or odorable expirations of Bodies; tho' absolutely speaking, it is permea∣ble to some corporeal Substances.
CHAP. VIII. Of the Porousness of Animal Bodies.
CHAP. IX. Of the Natural History of Human Blood.
PART. 1. Containing a List of Titles for the History of Human Blood.
The second Part of the Natural History of Hu∣man Blood, containing Miscellaneous Ex∣periments and Observations about Human Ʋrine. The third Part containing Promiscuous Experi∣ments and Observations, about the Serum of Human Blood.
The fourth Part, containing the History of the Spirit of Blood, begun.
TITLE I. Whether Human Blood may be so ordered by Fermentation or Putrefaction, as that in Distillation a Spirit either Ʋrinous or Vinous may ascend before the Phlegm.
TITLE II. Whether Spirit of Human Blood be really a∣ny thing but the Volatile Salt and Phlegm well commixed.
TITLE III. Of the Species of Saline Bodies, to which the Spirit of Human Blood is to be refer∣red.
TITLE IV. Whether the Spirit of Human Blood be dif∣fering from Spirit of Ʋrine, and other Salts called Volatile Alkalies.
TITLE V. Of the Quantity of Spirit contained in Hu∣man Blood, whether accompanied with its Serum, or dryed.
TITLE VI. Of the Consistence and Specifick Gravity of Human Blood.
TITLE VII. Of the Odour, Taste, Colour, and Transpa∣rency of the Spirit of Human Blood.
TITLE VIII. Of the dissolutive power of Spirit of Hu∣man Blood.
TITLE IX. Of the Tincture that may be drawn with Spirit of Human Blood.
TITLE X. Of the Coagulating power of the Spirit of Human Blood.
TITLE XI. Of the Precipitating power of Spirit of Human Blood.
TITLE XII. Of the Affinity between Spirit of Human Blood, and some Chymical Oyls and Vi∣nous Spirits.
TITLE XIII. Of the Relation betwixt Spirit of Human Blood and the Air.
TITLE XIV. Of the Hostility of the Spirit of Human Blood with Acids, whether they be in the form of Liquors or Fumes.
TITLE XV. Of the Medicinal Virtues of Spirit of Hu∣man Blood outwardly applyed.
TITLE XVI. Of the Medicinal Virtues of Spirit of Hu∣man Blood inwardly used.
CHAP. X. An Appendix to the Memoirs for the Na∣tural History of Human Blood: Con∣taining, first, particulars referable to the second Part of the foregoing History.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENT VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
Particulars referrable to the third Part of the History.
EXPERIMENT I.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III
Particulars referrable to the fourth Part of the History.
EXPERIMENT II.
EXPERIMENT III.
EXPERIMENT IV.
EXPERIMENT V.
EXPERIMENT VI.
EXPERIMENT VII.
EXPERIMENE VIII.
EXPERIMENT IX.
EXPERIMENT X.
EXPERIMENT XI.
EXPERIMENT XII.
EXPERIMENT XIII.
EXPERIMENT XIV.
EXPERIMENT XV.
Postscript
CHAP. XI. Of the Reconcileableness of Specifick Medi∣cines, to the Corpuscular Phylosophy.
PROP. I. Sometimes the specifick Medicine may cure by discussing or resolving the Morbifick matter, and thereby making it fit for Expulsion by the greater common shores of the Body, and the Pores of the Skin.
PROP. II. Sometimes a specifick Medicine may mortifie the over Acid, or other immoderate Par∣ticles, that infect the mass of Blood, and destroy their Coagulatory or other Effects.
PROP. III. Sometimes a Specifick Medicine may help the Patient, by Precipitating the peccant matter out of his Blood, or the other Liquors of the Body in which it harbours.
PROP. IV. Sometimes the Specifick Remedy may work by peculiarly strengthening and cherishing the Heart; the part affected, or both.
PROP. V. Sometimes a Specifick Medicine may act, by producing in the mass of Blood such a di∣sposition, as may enable Nature, by correct∣ing, expelling, or other fit ways, to sur∣mount the Morbifick matter, or other cause of the Disease.
PROP. VI. Sometimes a Specifick Remedy may unite with the peccant matter, and compose a Quid Nutrum, which may be less offensive to Na∣ture, tho' not so easily expelled.
CHAP. XII. A short account of Ambergrease communi∣cated in the Transactions of October 6. 1673.
ADVERTISEMENT.
The Table.