For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: England and Wales. Sovereign (1603-1625 : James I)
Title: By the King. A proclamation against excesse of lauish and licentious speech of matters of state.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further information or permissions.

Print source: By the King. A proclamation against excesse of lauish and licentious speech of matters of state.
England and Wales. Sovereign (1603-1625 : James I), James 1566-1625.

Imprinted at London: by Iohn Bill, printer to the Kings most excellent Maiestie, M.DC.XX. [1620]
Alternate titles: Proclamations. 1620-12-24 Proclamation against excesse of lauish and licentious speech of matters of state Proclamation against excesse of lavish and licentious speech of matters of state
Notes:
"Although the growth of intercourse with foreign nations has caused a greater liberty of discourse, even concerning matters of State, than ever before, the King would not stop it, but that it has become too free with matters of State. None are to intermeddle in such matters at home or abroad, but keep to that modest and reverent regard of matters above their their reach that befits good subjects. No man to think himself free from punishment because there are so many offenders. Well-disposed subjects will be punished, and much more those suspected for any reason of disaffection." -- Steele.
Dated at end: White-hall, the 24. of December, in the eighteenth yeere of our reigne ... .
Steele notation: Amassadors weaknesse glos-; Arms 11.
Reproduction of the originals in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery (Early English books) and the British Library (Misc. Brit. tracts).
Subject terms:
Freedom of speech -- Law and legislation -- Great Britain -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A22241.0001.001

Contents
colophon