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Author: Edwards, Richard, 1523?-1566.
Title: The paradyse of daynty deuises. Conteyning sundry pithy preceptes, learned counsels, and excellent inuentions, right pleasant and profitable for all estates. Deuised and written for the most part, by M. Edwardes, sometimes of her Maiesties Chappell: the rest, by sundry learned gentlemen, both of honor, and worship, whose names hereafter folowe.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The paradyse of daynty deuises. Conteyning sundry pithy preceptes, learned counsels, and excellent inuentions, right pleasant and profitable for all estates. Deuised and written for the most part, by M. Edwardes, sometimes of her Maiesties Chappell: the rest, by sundry learned gentlemen, both of honor, and worship, whose names hereafter folowe.
Edwards, Richard, 1523?-1566.

Imprinted at London: By [R. Jones for?] Henry Disle, dwelling in Paules Churchyard, at the Southwest doore of Saint Paules Church, and are there to be solde, 1578.
Alternate titles: The paradise of daynty devises Paradise of daynty devises
Notes:
Printer's name suggested by STC.
A rearrangement, with omissions and additions, of the first edition of 1576 (STC 7516)--STC.
In verse.
Numerous errors in foliation; foliation derived from signature collation.
The British Library copy has an extra bifolium (chi K2) with foliation in large roman type; it is not present in the Bodleian Library copy and may represent a later issue of this edition--STC.
Signatures: A-I4 K2 L4 M2.
Reproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
English poetry -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A21162.0001.001

Contents
title page
illustration
TO THE RIGHT HO¦norable Sir Henry Compton Knight, Lord Compton of Compton.
The translation of the blessed S. Barnards verses, conteining the vnstable felicitie of this wayfaring world.
text
1. Our pleasures are vanities.
2.
3. The perfect tryall of a faythfull freend
4. Being asked the occasion of his white head, he annswereth thus.
5. Beware of had I wyst.
6. M. Edwards MAY.
7. Faire words make fooles faine.
8. In his extreame sicknesse.
9. For Christmas day.
10. For Easter dcy.
11. For Whitsunday.
12. No pleasure without some payne.
13.
14. Of the vnconstant stay of Fortunes giftes.
15. Promise is debt.
16. No words, but deedes.
17. He desyreth exchange of life.
18. Of the instabilitie of youth.
19.
20.
21.
22. Nothing is comparable vnto a faithfull freend,
23. Remember thy ende.
24.
25. Wanting his desyre he complayneth.
26. Trye before you truste.
27. A Lady forsaken complayneth.
28. Finding worldly ioyes but vanities, he wisheth death.
29. A replie to M. Edwards MAY.
30. Hauing marryed a worthy Lady, and taken away by death, he com∣playneth his mishap.
31. A worthy ditie, song before the Queenes Maiestie at Bristowe.
32. An Epitaph vpon the death of Syr Edward Saunders. Knight, Lord cheefe Boron of the Exchequer.
33. His good name being blemished, he bewayleth.
34. Of Fortunes power.
36.
37. Of perfect wisedome.
38. A freendly admonition.
39. Sundry men sundry affectes.
40. Of a Freend and a Flatterer.
41. Of sufferaunce commeth ease.
43. All thinges are Vaine:
44. A Vertuous Gentlewoman in the praise of hir loue.
45. Oppressed with sorow he wisheth death.
47.
48. What ioy to a contented mind.
47.
49. Amantium irae amoris redinti graciae est.
43. Thinke to dye.
51.
52. Beeing forsaken of his frend he complaineth.
53. Prudens. The history of Damacles, & Dionise.
48. Fortitude. A young man of Aegypt, and Valerian.
58. Iustice. Zaleuch and his Sonne.
59. Temperaunce. Spurina and the Romaine Ladies.
60. A bunche of hearbes and flowers.
62. In commendation of Musick.
63. A dialog betwene the auctour and his eye.
64. Fyndyng no ioye, he desireth death.
Hope well and haue well.
He requesteth some frendly comfort, affirmyng his constancie.
His complaneth his mishapp.
No foe to a flatterer.
His comparison of Loue.
A Louers ioye.
Euill to hym that euill thinketh.
He assureth his constancie.
Complainyng his mishapp to his frende, he complaineth wittely.
No paines comparable to his attempt.
He repenteth his follie.
No pleasure without some paine.
The fruite of feined frendes.
A dialogue betwene a Gentleman and his Loue.
Exclamyng vpon his vnkinde Loue, his frende replieth wittely.
The complaint of a Louer, wearyng Blacke and Taunie.
Findyng no releef, he complaineth thus.
A Louer disdained, complaineth.
Beyng in Loue, he complaineth.
A Louer reiected, complaineth.
Not attainyng to his desire, he complaineth.
His mynde not quietly setled, he writeth thus.
That Loue is requited by disdaine.
Of a contented state.
Beyng disdained, he complaineth.
Of the meane estate.
Of a contented mynd.
Trie before you trust.
He renounceth all the affectes of Loue.
Bethinking hym self of his ende, writeth thus.
Beyng in Loue, he complaineth.
Beyng in trouble, he writeth thus.
Beyng troubled in mynde, he writeth as followeth.
Looke or you leape.
The complaint of a Synner.