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Author: Underwood, Robert, fl. 1605.
Title: A nevv anatomie. VVherein the body of man is very fit and aptly (two wayes) compared: 1 To a household. 2 To a cittie. With diuers necessarie approoued medicines, not commonly practised heretofore: wittie, and pleasant to be read, and profitable to be regarded.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A nevv anatomie. VVherein the body of man is very fit and aptly (two wayes) compared: 1 To a household. 2 To a cittie. With diuers necessarie approoued medicines, not commonly practised heretofore: wittie, and pleasant to be read, and profitable to be regarded.
Underwood, Robert, fl. 1605.

At London: Printed [by W. White] for William Iones, and are to be sold at the signe of the Gunne neare Holborne Conduit, 1605.
Alternate titles: A new anatomie. New anatomie.
Notes:
Dedication signed: Ro. Vnderwood.
Printer's name from STC.
In verse.
Reproduction of the original in the Library of Congress.
Subject terms:
Anatomy, Human -- Poetry -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A14205.0001.001

Contents
title page
epigraph
TO THE RIGHT WOR∣SHIPFVLL SIR ARTHVR HEVENINGHAM Knight, one of his Maiesties Iustices of the Peace and Corum, within his Highnes Coun∣ties of Suffolke and Norfolke.
A NEW ANATOMIE, OR, A description of the whole Body of man, after an vnwonted manner: No lesse pleasant to the Reader, then profitable to the Regarder.