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Author: Tartaglia, Niccoláo, d. 1557.
Title: Three bookes of colloquies concerning the arte of shooting in great and small peeces of artillerie, variable randges, measure, and waight of leaden, yron, and marble stone pellets, minerall saltepeeter, gunpowder of diuers sortes, and the cause why some sortes of gunpower are corned, and some sortes of gunpowder are not corned: written in Italian, and dedicated by Nicholas Tartaglia vnto the Royall Prince of most famous memorie Henrie the eight, late King of England, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the faith &c. And now translated into English by Cyprian Lucar Gent. who hath also augmented the volume of the saide colloquies with the contents of euery colloquie, and with all the corollaries and tables, that are in the same volume. Also the said Cyprian Lucar hath annexed vnto the same three books of colloquies a treatise named Lucar Appendix ...
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
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Print source: Three bookes of colloquies concerning the arte of shooting in great and small peeces of artillerie, variable randges, measure, and waight of leaden, yron, and marble stone pellets, minerall saltepeeter, gunpowder of diuers sortes, and the cause why some sortes of gunpower are corned, and some sortes of gunpowder are not corned: written in Italian, and dedicated by Nicholas Tartaglia vnto the Royall Prince of most famous memorie Henrie the eight, late King of England, Fraunce, and Ireland, defender of the faith &c. And now translated into English by Cyprian Lucar Gent. who hath also augmented the volume of the saide colloquies with the contents of euery colloquie, and with all the corollaries and tables, that are in the same volume. Also the said Cyprian Lucar hath annexed vnto the same three books of colloquies a treatise named Lucar Appendix ...
Tartaglia, Niccoláo, d. 1557., Lucar, Cyprian, b. 1544.

Printed at London: [by Thomas Dawson] for Iohn Harrison [the elder], 1588.
Notes:
Printer's name and that Harrison is the elder from colophon.
Original sub title page on G5 with device McKerrow 236 is sometimes replaced by cancel bifolium with sub title page with cut of mortar shooting and errata on verso of 2nd leaf; both varieties in Harvard University. Library copy. Harvard also has cancel G3,4 with G3r line 5 from bottom ending "saide" instead of "sayde" as in the British Library copy--STC.
With a final errata leaf.
With cancel.
Reproduction of the original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
Ballistics -- Early works to 1800.
Gunnery -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A13381.0001.001

Contents
title page
frontispiece
TO THE RIGHT HONORA∣BLE, ROBERT EARLE OF LEICES∣TER, BARON OF DENBIGH, LORD STEW∣ARD OF HER MAIESTIES HOVSHOLD, CHIEFE IVSTICE, in Oyer, of all her Maiesties Forrests, Parkes, Chases, and Warrens, by South Trent, and Knight of the most honorable orders of the Garter, and Saint Michael in Fraunce, and one of the Lords of her Maiesties most Honora∣ble Priuie Counsell.
TO THE MOST PVISANT AND MERCIFVLL Prince Henrie the eight by the grace of God King of Eng∣land Fraunce and Ireland, &c.
AD LECTOREM.
colloquies
The first booke of Nicholas Tartaglia his Collo∣quies, concerning the Arte of shooting in great and small Peeces of Artillerie,
The first Colloquie.
The second Colloquie.
The third Colloquie.
The 4. Colloquie.
The 5. Colloquie.
The 6. Colloquie.
The 7. Colloquie.
The 8. Colloquie.
The 9. Colloquie.
The 10. Colloquie.
The 11. Colloquie.
The first Corollarie.
The 12. Colloquie.
The 13. Colloquie.
The 14. Colloquie.
The 15. Colloquie.
The 16. Colloquie.
The 17. Colloquie.
The 18. Colloquie.
The 19. Colloquie.
The 20 Colloquie.
The 21. Colloquie.
The 22. Colloquie.
The 2. Corollarie.
The 3. Corollarie.
The 23 Colloquie.
The 4 Corollarie.
The 24 Colloquie.
The 25 Colloquie.
The 26. Colloquie
The 5 Corollarie.
The 27. Colloquie
The 28 Colloquie.
The 29. Colloquie
The 30 Colloquie.
The second Booke of Nicholas Tartaglia his Colloquies concerning the variable ranges, measures, and weights, of lea∣den, yron, and marble stone pellets,
The first Colloquie.
The 2 Colloquie.
The 3 Colloquie.
The first Corollarie.
The 4 Colloquie.
The 5. Colloquie.
The 2. Corollary.
The sixt Colloquie.
The 7 Colloquie.
The 8. Colloquie.
The 9. Colloquie.
The 10. Colloquie.
The 2. Corollary.
The 11. Colloquie.
The 12. Colloquie.
The 3 Corollarie.
The third booke of Nicholas Tartaglia his Colloquies concerning minerall Saltpeeter of diuers colours, Gunpowder of diuers sortes, and the cause why some sortes of gunpowder are corned, and some sortes of gunpowder are not corned,
The first Colloquie.
The 2 Colloquie.
The 3 Colloquie.
The 4 Colloquie.
The 5. Colloquie.
The first Corollarie.
The 6. Colloquie.
The 7 Colloquie.
The 8. Colloquie.
The 2 Corollarie.
The 9. Colloquie.
The 10 Colloquie.
treatise
A TREATISE NAMED LVCAR APPENDIX, COLLECTED BY CYPRIAN LVCAR GEN∣TLEMAN, OVT OF DIVERS GOOD AVTHORS IN DIVERS LANGVAGES:
frontispiece
The names of Authors out of whose Bookes the greatest parte of this Treatise named LƲCAR APPENDIX, hath been collected.
body of treatise
The first Chapter. The properties, office, and duetie of a Gunner.
The 2. Chapter. How artificiall Saltpeeter which is a mixture of many substances hath (as some suppose) greater ver∣tue, and more strength than mynerall saltpeeter: how artificiall saltpeeter is made of fine and small earth by two sundry wayes: how the earth which maketh artificiall saltpeeter is digged out of sellers, vaultes, stables, oxstalles, gote or sheepecotes, pigen houses, or out of the loermost roomes in other houses: how blacke earth which will sparkle in a fire, or yeelde a sharpe, byting, and meane salt taste doth make good saltpeeter: how for the making of artificiall saltpeeter you must prouide a sufficient number of cauldrons, furnaces, barrelles, halfe tubbes, and a conuenient quantitie of wood, white∣lime, ashes of oke, earth, and water, and how the sayd cauldrons, furnaces, barrels, and halfe tubbes must be placed.
The 3 Chapter. How you may make an excellent kind of artificiall Saltpeter of the flowre which groeth on walles: how Saltpeter water must bee boyled: howe you may knowe when Saltpeter water hath boyled enough: how Saltpeter water which is burned may bee made good againe: and how Saltpeter in his refining doth waste.
The 4 Chapter. How good Saltpeter may be knowne.
The 5 Chapter. How Saltpeter may be made to groe where none did groe before: and how earth which hath made Salt∣peter may be made after the end of fiue or sixe yeeres to yeelde more Saltpeter than it did yeelde at the first time.
The 6 Chapter. How Saltpeter meale is made: and how Saltpeter meale without any beating will serue among other materiall things to make gunpowder.
The 7 Chapter. How Saltpeter may be refined with water by two sundrie wayes: and how Saltpeter refined with water ought to be dried.
The 8 Chapter. How Saltpeter may be refined with fire: and how Saltpeter may be better refined with water than with fire.
The 9 Chapter. How you may sublime and purifie Saltpeter by two sundry waies.
The 10 Chapter. How you may sublime Brimstone, Arsenike and salt Armoniake.
The 11 Chapter. How you may make Coles for gunpowder by foure sundrie wayes.
The 12 Chapter. How you may make a mixture of Brimstone and quickesiluer for gunpowder: and how Brimstone which shall serue for gunpowder ought alwaies to be very drie, and without any fat.
The 13 Chapter. How the makers of gunpowder doe mingle togeather the simples and materiall thinges of which they doe make gunpowder: and how gunpowder must be kept in drie vessels of wood, and laide in high roomes of houses: and how an emptie caske of wood ought to waie 12 poundes: and euery caske fil∣led full of gunpowder ought to waie one hundred waight of Auer de poize waight: and how euery last of gunpowder ought to waye 24 hundred waight of the said Auer de poize waight.
The 14 Chapter. How you may grinde or beate gunpowder by sixe sundrie waies: how gunpowder ought not to be bea∣ten drie: and how you may know whether or no gunpowder is well beaten, or enough grounde.
The 15 Chapter. How you may corne gunpowder.
The 16 Chapter. How you may make diuers sorts of gunpowder: and how you may make gunpowder of diuers colours: and how you may abate the force of gunpowder: and how for want of aqua vitae and vineger to moi∣sten gunpowder, you may vse the water of Saltpeeter, or if you will the vrine of a man: & how Mute gunpowder is of little force.
To make grosse gunpowder for great Ordinance.
To make fine gunpowder for Handgunnes.
To make more finer gunpowder for Handgunnes.
To make fine corne powder for Handgunnes of that sort of grosse gunpowder wihch before in the be∣ginning of this Chapter is marked with the figure 1.
To make an other sort of fine corne powder.
To make an other sort of fine come gunpowder.
To make gunpowder which will take fire and burne in a moist place and in wet weather.
To make gunpowder which by long keeping shall not decay in qualitie, nor consume in quantitie.
To make an other sort of corne gunpowder.
To make white gunpowder,
To make redde gunpowder.
To make gunpowder of an azure colour.
To make a strong kinde of gunpowder and to abate the strength of any kinde of gunpowder.
To make an other kinde of gunpowder.
A censure of Mute gunpowder.
The 17 Chapter. To renue and make good againe any sort of gunpowder that hath lost his strength or vertue by moisture long lying, or by any other meanes.
The 18 Chapter. How you may by taste, feeling, colour, and burning, know good and il gunpowder: and how among many sortes of gunpowder, you may know the best sorte of gunpowder.
The 19 Chapter. To make diuers sortes of gunmatches, and other matches, which will serue to discharge great & small peeces of artillerie, and geue fire to trunkes, pykes, mines, dartes, arrowes, & all other firewoorkes.
section
An other way to make Gunmatches.
An other way to make Gunmatches.
An other way to make matches, which wil serue to geue fire to trunkes, pottes, pikes, darts, arrows, hollow pellettes, and al other such like fireworkes.
The 20. Chapter. To make touchwood and tinder for a Gunners Tinder boxe.
The 21 Chapter. To make a stone which being wette with water, or spittle, will flame and be a fire, and serue to light can∣dles, and gunmatches, in such places where by reason of rayne, or other moysture, you can not light candles, or matches by any other meanes.
section
2 An other way to make a like stone, which being well wette with water or spittle, will flame and be a fire.
3 An other way to make a like stone, which being wette with water or spittle, will flame & bee a fire.
4 An other way to make a like stone, which being wette with water or spittle, will flame and be a fire.
5 An other way to make a like stone which being wette with water or spittle, will flame and be a fire.
The 22 Chapter. How you may make a stone which being wette with aqua vitae, wil kindle and flame: and how you may make an other stone, which being rubbed well with a woollen clothe, will suddenly burne.
The 23. Chapter. How you may know the diameter or heigth of a pellet by the circumference of the same pellet: And how by the diameter and waight of one pellet you may finde the diameter of any other pellet that is of a knowen waight and of like substance: and how a hundred waight of pellettes doth containe 112. poundes: and how a tunne of pellettes doth contayne twenty hundred waight of pellettes.
The 24 Chapter. How you may measure the circumference of any rounde pellet, or sphericall bodye, by three sundry wayes.
The 25 Chapter. How you may measure the superficies of any rounde pellet or sphericall body by three sundrie wayes.
The 26 Chapter. How you may measure the solide content or crassitude of any rounde pellet or sphericall body by three sundry wayes.
The 27 Chapter. How a pellet which sticketh so fast within the concauitie of a peece of Artillerie as that it can not be driuen home vnto the powder may be shotte out of the peece without danger to the Gunner, or hurte to the peece: and how any rusty pellet which for a long time hath stuck fast within a peece may be shotte, or taken out of the peece without danger to the Gunner or hurte to the peece.
The 28 Chapter. To make rounde pellettes of vnrounde yron pellettes by two diuers wayes.
The 29 Chapter. How you may make a modell or forme for any Gunladle that shall appertayne vnto any Fanconet, for∣reine peece that is not so high as a Faucon, Faucon, Minion, Saker, Culueringe, Basiliske, Cannon, or to any other like made peece: And how vppon such modelles, or formes, gunladles for the sayde peeces are fashioned: and how a Ladle for any Cannon periero may be made: and how euery can∣non periero ought to haue a Ladle.
The 30 Chapter. Rules by which you may know the true breadth and length of any Ladle that will holde at twise an ordinarie charge in Serpentine powder for any great peece of Artillery except Cannoni Pe∣rieri, Chamber, and morter peeces.
The 31 Chapter. Rules by which you may knowe the true breadth and length of any Ladle that will holde at twise an ordinary charge of that sorte of corne gunpowder which I haue marked in the sixteene Chapter of this Appendix with the figure of , for any Fauconet, forreyne peece that is not so high as a Fau∣con, Faucon, Minion, Saker, Culueringe, Basiliske, Cannon, or any other like made peece.
The 32. Chapter. How you may knowe the diameter of any Chamber bored Cannon: and make a Ladle for any Chamber bored Cannon.
The 33 Chapter. How you may make a Ladle for any Bell bored Cannon.
The 34 Chapter. How you may make Rammers for Faulconets, forreine ordinance that are not so high as the Faucon, Faucons, minions, Sakers, Culuerings, Basiliscoes, demie Cannons, and double Cannons: and how a Rammer and ladle which doe belong to some sort of peeces may be set vppon one staffe: and how a Rammer and ladle which doe belong to some other sort of peeces must be set vppon sundrie staues: and how a Rammer serueth to thrust home powder that shall lie loose and dispearsed within a peece, to driue a Tampion close vnto powder within a peece, and to put a pellet close vnto the Tampion: and how you may make rammers for those peeces which in Italian are called Cannoni perieri.
The 35 Chapter. How you may make spunges or scourers for any sort of great peeces: and how spunges doe serue to make cleane soule peeces, and to coole hot peeces.
The 36 Chapter. How you may make Cartredges vppon a round moulde or forme of wood.
The 37 Chapter. How great peeces of artillery are named & how through the intollerable fault of carelesse or vnskil∣full Gunfounders all our great Peeces of one name are not of one length, nor of one waight, nor of one heigth in their mouthes.
The 38. Chapter. The mixture of mettals whereof great peeces of artillery ought to be made.
The 39 Chapter. Rules by which you may know the proportioned length, iust waight, and due thicknesse of mettall which ought to be in great peeces of artillerie.
The 40 Chapter. To measure the thicknesse of mettall in any part of a peece of artillerie.
The 41 Chapter. How euery great peece of Artillerie hath trunnions for three causes: and how Gunfounders may learne to set the trunnions of euery great peece in their due places.
The 42 Chapter. How great peeces of artillerie may be cast of lead? how the thicknesse of a leaden peece round about the concauitie so farre as the due charge of gunpowder for the same peece will reach ought to be once & a halfe, so much as the height of a pellet that is fit for the same peece: how the thicknesse of a leaden peece at his necke round about the concauitie, ought to be ⅔ partes of the heigth of the said pellet: how any one peece of what weight soeuer it is, may be drawne by the strength of many men from one place to another. And how olde rustie yron serueth to make gunne pellets better than nwe yron.
The 43 Chapter. How you may see, & also otherwise know whether or no honie combes, crackes, or flawes are within the concauitie of any great peece of artillerie.
The 44 Chapter. How any great peece of artillery may be drawne ouer a soft marrish ground, bog, or owes.
The 45 Chapter. How by knowing the certaine number of men, horses, or oxen which will draw any one peece of artille∣rie, you may tell what number of men, horses, or oxen will be able to drawe any other peece of ar∣tillerie: how you may know what number of men will in drawing counteruaile any number of hor∣ses, or oxen: how you may know what number of horses will in drawing counteruaile any number of Oxen: & how this is to bee noted that a fraction in a quotient number of men, horses, or oxen is not to bee reckoned.
The 46 Chapter. How all platfourmes for great Ordinance ought to be couered with woodden planks: and how it is better to plant great Ordinance vppon plaine and leuell platfourmes, than vppon slope platfourmes.
The 47 Chapter. How you may know by a gunners Quadrant, and also by a gunners Semicircle whether or no a plat∣fourme for great Ordinance, or any other peece of grounde, lyeth in a perfect leuell.
The 48 Chapter. How Gabbions or Baskets of earth may be made vppon platfourmes in time of militarie seruice for the defence of Gunners: and how men vppon a platfourme or vppon the walles of a Cittie, Towne, or Fort, where no Gabbions or Baskets of earth are to shadow them in time of militarie seruice, may be shadowed with canuas, cables, ropes, wet straw or hay, mattresses or ship sailes.
The 49 Chapter. Rules by which Rabinets, Bases, Fauconets, forreine ordinance that are not so high as the Faucon, Faucons, Minions, Sakers, Culuerings, Basiliskes, Cannons, and all peeces which do shoote stone pel∣lets may for proofe and also for seruice be duely charged with that sort of corne gunpowder which is marked in the 16 Chapter of this Appendix with the figure of 1, and by which you may tell what roome a due charge of such corne gunpowder will fill vp in the concauitie of any great peece that shooteth pellets of lead, or pellets of yron.
The 50 Chapter. Rules by which carriages for great peeces of artillery ought to be made.
The 51 Chapter. How with a Ladle you may geue vnto any Fauconet, Faucon, Minion, Saker, Culueringe, Basiliske, Cannon, or any other like made Peece his due charge in gunpowder: how you may in time of ser∣uice charge any of the sayde peeces with cartredges: and how you may safely discharge any of the sayd peeces.
The 52 Chapter. How without a Ladle you may lade any Fauconet, Faucon, Minion, Saker, Culueringe, Cannon, or other like made Peece with his due charge in loose gunpowder.
The 53 Chapter. How you may duely charge any Chamber peece of Artillery, and how you may charge any Cannon Periero.
The 54 Chapter. How you may cause any great peece of Artillerie to make in his discharge an exceeding great noyse, and a marueylous rore.
The 55 Chapter. This Chapter following sheweth that some great peeces of Artillerie doe serue to batter, and that some great peeces of Artillery doe serue to lie vppon walles of Cities, Townes, Castles and Fortes, and that some great peeces of Artillerie doe serue for the fielde. Also this Chapter following sheweth how many times in one day certayne great peeces of Artillerie may be safely charged and discharged, and how many Gunners and Assistantes or Labourers certayne great peeces of Artillerie ought to haue.
The 56 Chapter. How a peece of Artillery ought not to be prooued vppon his carriage: how a peece of Artillery that shalbe prooued ought to be made cleane: how a peece of Artillery that shalbe prooued ought to be without hony combes, flawes, & crackes: and how he which hath charged a peece for proofe, ought when he doth discharge the same peece to stande behinde a banke of earth, or wall, vntill by a trayne of gunpowder he hath discharged the sayde peece.
The 57 Chapter. How you may by fiue sundry wayes disparte any Fauconet, Faucon, Minion, Saker, Culuering, Cannon, or any other like made peece: how you may finde out the middle and vppermost parte of mettal ouer the tayle of any peece: how you may finde out the middle and vppermost parte of mettall ouer the mouth of any peece: and how you ought to set the disparte of euery peece vppon the middle and vp∣permost parte of mettall ouer the mouth of the peece.
The 58 Chapter. How with a Fauconet, Faucon, Minion, Saker, Culueringe, or Cannon, you may alwayes strike any appoynted marke within poynt blanke.
The 59 Chapter. How you may know what number of feete, yardes, pases, or scores, any peece of Artillerie will shoote in an vnsensible crooked line, or (as the Gunners terme is) at poynt blanke.
The 60 Chapter. How the poynt blanke and vtmost ranges are proportionall in all peeces of Artillerie: How by the rule of proportion you may knowe what number of yardes any peece will reach at his vtmost randon: And how by the sayd rule you may know what number of yardes any peece will reach at his poynte blanke.
The 61 Chapter. How you must mount your peece when you will shoote vnto the farthest end of the vtmost randone.
The 62 Chapter. How you may mounte any great peece of Artillerie with a ruler, as well as with a quadrant or se∣micircle vnto the number of tenne degrees, and how such a ruler ought to be made: and how such a ruler ought to be vsed when a peece of Artillerie is by it mounted, or imbased.
The 63 Chapter. How you may by the helpe of wedges lay the concauitie of any great peece of Artillerie right against a marke: how by the helpe of wedges you may make a perfect shoote at a marke lying vnder the mouth of your Peece: and how by the helpe of wedges you may cause your Peece to strike in the marke, after it hath at one shoote shotte vnder the marke, and at an other shoote shotte aboue the marke.
The 64 Chapter. How to make a perfect shoote at any companie of horsemen, or footemen passing by the place where Or∣dinance doth lie vppon a leuell grounde: and also how to make a perfect shoote at any shippe sayling in a riuer by the place where Ordinaunce doth lie vppon a leuell grounde: and also how to make a per∣fect shoote at any moouing thing passing by a place where Ordinance doth lie vppon an vneuen ground.
The 65 Chapter. How much a peece must bee eleuated for to shoote vpwardes at a marke vppon a hill without point blanke: and by what meanes the mouth of a peece may be laid right vppon any marke.
The 66 Chapter. How much a peece ought to bee imbased for to shoote at a marke lying in a valley without point blanke.
The 67 Chapter. How you may certainely know by the Gunners Semicircle whether a ship vppon the Sea, or an Armie vppon the land, or any other thing seene a farre of, doth come towardes you, stande still, or goe from you: and how you ought to discharge your great ordinance of diuers sortes against a ship, or an Armie comming towardes you.
The 65 Chapter. How you may make a perfect shoote in a darke night at any marke that may be seene in the day time: and how a lighted candle may be carried in the night time so as no light shall be seene but at your will and pleasure.
The 69 Chapter. How you may carrie in the night time a lighted Gunmatch so as it shall not bee seene nor bee wet with raine.
The 70 Chapter. In what distance peeces of Artillerie ought to be planted for batterie: In what order peeces of artil∣lery ought to be mounted for batterie: In what sort peeces of artillery ought to bee discharged for batterie: and in what measure a breach with battery ought to be: and in what maner a peece made hot with many shootes ought to be cooled.
The 71 Chapter. How a Gunner may outshoote other Gunners in one and the same peece at one and the same eleuation with pellets of one waight, & of one kinde, & with an equall waight of one & the same kind of gun∣powder.
The 72 Chapter. How you may amend high, loe, and wide shootes.
The 73 Chapter. To make an engine which will make a great spoile and a merueilous slaughter.
The 74 Chapter. Instructions for all those that are vnskilfull to handle and vse an Harchibuse, Caliuer, or Musket.
The 75 Chapter. How to mount a morter peece for to shoote out of the same fireworks or great stones ouer walles or other high places into cities, townes, or camps, to burne and beate downe houses, tents, and lodgings within the same places.
The 76 Chapter. How you may make an yron dart which being shot out of any great peece of artillerie, or out of the in∣guine called Balista, or throne out of your handes against any woodden obiect, will burne and con∣sume the same obiect if it shall strike and sticke in the same obiect.
The 77 Chapter. To make balles or pellets of fire which being shot out of great ordinance, or throne out of mens hands will sticke fast and burne the obiect in which they shall strike.
The 78 Chapter. How you may make holloe baules of mettall which being shot out of great Ordinance or morter pee∣ces, or throne with slings out of mens hands among soldiers standing or marching in battaile ray, will sodainely breake in many peeces and doe great hurt.
The 79 Chapter. How you may make diuers sortes of baules of wildefire which may be shotte out of Morter peeces, and also out of other great peeces of Ordinance: And how you may make diuers sortes of baules of wildefire and other firewoorkes which may be throen out of mens hands with slinges, cordes, or o∣ther such like thinges, into a Towne, Forte, Trenche, or Campe, or among men set in battelray.
section
section 2
3 An other kinde of firewoorke which may be throne out of mens handes among enemies set in battell ray, and which may be shotte out of great Ordinance and Morter peeces into Townes, Castles, Campes and Shippes.
4 An other firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Ordinance and Morter peeces, or throne out of mens handes.
5 An other firewoorke which will burne in water, and may be shotte out of great Ordinance and Morter peeces in holloe balles of mettall, & throne with slinges out of mens hands.
6 An other vnquenchable firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Ordinance and Morter peeces, and may be throne in pottes out of mens handes with slinges.
7 An other firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Ordinance, or out of Trombes or Trunkes, or throne in pottes, and which will serue for Pykes, Dartes, Arrowes, or any other kinde of fire∣woorke, and may be kept good for a very long time.
8 An other kinde of firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Ordinance.
9 An other kinde of firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Ordinance.
10 An other kinde of firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Ordinance, or throne with mens hands, and will burne in water, armour, stones and euery other thing vppon which it shall fal,
An other kinde of Firewoorke which may be shotte out of great Peeces of Artil∣lerie or throne out of mens handes.
The 80 Chapter. How you may make diuers sortes of Firewoorkes, which being shotte in a darke night out of a Mor∣terpeece, or out of any other peece of Artillerie, or throne out of mens hands into an appointed place, will geue so great a light as that you may discerne by the same light whether or noany enemies are in or neare vnto that place.
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An other kinde of Firewoorke which being shotte in a darke night out of a Morter peece, or out of any other peece of Artillerie, or throne out of mens hands into an appoynted place, will geue so great a light as that you may discerne by the same light whether or no any enemies are in or neare vnto that place.
An other kinde of firewoorke which being shot out of great peeces will geue a great light.
An other kinde of firewoorke which being shot out of great peeces will geue a great light and serue to burne the enemies munition.
An other kinde of firewoorke which being shotte in a darke night out of Morter peeces, or out of o∣ther great peeces of Artillerie, or throne out of mens hands into any place, will geue so great a light as that you may see by the same light whether or no any enemies are in, or neare vnto that place, and will burne sackes of bumbase, sackes of wooll, and such other things which are sometimes hanged before a wall to defend the same from the force of battering peeces.
The 81 Chapter. To make and vse halfe baked pottes, and fiue sundrie sortes of firewoorkes which may be put into the same pottes, and be throne out of mens hands for offensiue and defensiue seruice.
The 82 Chapter. To make 5 diuers kindes of firewoorkes which may be put into pottes, holloe staues, canes, or other ves∣sels, and throne out of mens handes in defensiue and offensiue seruice.
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2 An other firewoorke which may be put into pottes and throne out of mens hands in offensiue and defensiue seruice, and may be shotte out of Trunkes, or tied to the endes of arrowes or dartes, and will serue to burne gates, carts, & all other woodden things that shalbe annoynted with the same.
3 An other firewoorke which may be put into pottes, and throne out of mens handes in defensiue and offensiue seruice.
4 An other kinde of firewoorke which may be put into pottes, and throne out of mens hands in defen∣siue and offensiue seruice.
5 An other firewoorke which may be throne out of mens hands in defensiue and offensiue seruice, & can not be quenched with any other thing than with vineger or vrine.
The 83 Chapter. To make 5 sundrie sortes of firewoorkes which will kindle with water or rayne.
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2 An other firewoorke which wil kindle with rayne or water.
3 An other firewoorke which will kindle with water or rayne.
4 An other firewoorke which will kindle with water or rayne.
5 An other firewoorke which will kindle and burne with water, and also with spittle.
The 84 Chapter. To make 2 sundry sorts of firewoorkes which will kindle with the heate of the sunne, & burne in water.
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2 An other fire worke which will kindle with the heate of the Sunne, and burne in water, and that may be choked with drie sand or earth, and can not bee quenched with any other thing than with stale vrine, or strong vineger.
The 85 Chapter. To make balles of fire which will burne in water.
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2 An other fireworke which will burne in water, and consume armor, wood, and euery other thing that it shall fall on.
3 An other fireworke which will burne in water and consume armor, wood, and euery other thing that it shall fall on.
4 An other fireworke which will burne in water and consume armor, wood, and euery other thing that it shall fall on,
5 An other fireworke which will burne in water, and consume armor, wood, and euery other thing that it shall fall on, and can not be quenched but with strong vineger.
The 86 Chapter. To make a fireworke which will burne stones and yron.
The 87 Chapter. To make a fireworke which was first inuented by the sonnes of Amram.
The 88 Chapter. To make an vnquenchable fireworke which will burne without any flame.
The 89 Chapter. To make a fireworke which shall burne and doe his desired effect at any appointed time.
The 90 Chapter. To make a fireworke which may be vsed in militarie seruice, and also in triumphes.
The 91 Chapter. To make a fireworke which may be cast vp into the ayre, and may be shot out of a trunke or trombe.
The 92 Chapter. To make a fireworke which at a triumph may be cast vp into the ayre.
The 93 Chapter. To make Rockettes or Squibbes which being throne vp into the ayre wil cast foorth flames of fire, and in comming downe towards the ground will shew like starres falling from heauen.
The 94 Chapter. To make Torches and candles which after they are lighted cannot be ex∣tinguished with any winde or water.
The 95 Chapter. To make a fireworke which will burne and giue a great light in a Crosset.
The 96 Chapter. To kindle fire with the heate of the Sunne.
The 97 Chapter. How you may make a Trunke or Trombe which will shoote fireworkes, and may bee vsed in fight vp∣pon the Sea, and in fight vppon the lande: how you may make a furious and quicke burning fire∣worke for the said Trunke: how you may make a sloe and soft burning fireworke for the said trunke: and how you may make diuers fortes of fireworkes for the said trunke: and how you ought to charge the said trunke with the said furious and quicke burning fireworke: and also with the saide sloe and soft burning fireworke.
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2 An other mixture with which the sayd trunke may be charged.
3 An other mixture with which a trunke may be charged.
4 An other mixture with which a trunke may be charged.
The 98 Chapter. How you may make foure sundrie sortes of Trunkes or Trombes: how you may make foure sundry sortes of mixtures for the said Trunkes: how you may make balles or pellets for the said trunks: and how you ought to charge the said Trunkes with the said mixtures and pellets.
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How you may make a Trunke or Trombe after an other fashion, and a mixture to charge the sayde Trunke: and how you ought to charge this Trunke with the said mixture.
The 99 Chapter. To tie a fireworke at the vpper end of a scaling ladder.
The 100 Chapter.
1 To make three sundrie Firewoorkes which will bloe vp walles, towres, fortes, and such like thinges, and spoyle many enemies.
2 An other Firewoorke which will bloe vp walles, towers, fortes, and such like thinges, and spoyle many enemies.
3 An other Firewoorke which will bloe vp Walles, Towers, Fortes, and such like thinges, and spoyle many enemies.
The 101 Chapter. How Frauncesse George of Sena was the first inuentor of Mynes: how caues or mynes for the subuersion of Fortes, Castles, and walles of Cities ought to be made: and how gunpowder ought to be placed in the ouens of such Mynes, that the same gunpowder may ouerthroe and bloe the Forts, Castles, and Walles of Cities which shall stande directly ouer the sayde ouens.
The 102 Chapter. How a caue ought to be made rounde about a Castle or Forte that is besieged, to the intent that they which are in the saide caue may heare and perceaue at all times whether or no the enemie doth woorke to vndermyne the same Castle or Forte.
The 103 Chapter. To make a burning oyle of Saltpeeter and Brimstone mingled togeather for Firewoorkes.
The 104 Chapter. To make oyle of Brimstone for Firewoorkes.
The 105 Chapter. To make two sortes of burning waters for Firewoorkes.
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An other burning water which burned vppon a mans hande will doe no harme thereunto.
The 106 Chapter. How the clay which some men name Lutum sapientiae, and some men doe call Lute of wisdome, is made: And how the said clay will serue to stoppe vessels of glasse and Fornaces, and to make thicke mouldes, and many other thinges.
The 107 Chapter. How you may way with feure seuerall waightes any quantitie from one pounde waight vnto fourtie poundes in waight: how you may way with fiue seuerall waightes any quantitie from one pounde waight vnto an hundred twenty & one poundes in waight: how you may way with 6 seuerall waights any quantitie from one pound waight vnto three hundred sixty & foure pounds in waight: and how vppon a Beame called a Stater, you may with a small waight way thinges of very great waight.
The 108 Chapter. To make three sundrie oyntments which will heale any person scalded with hotte Saltpeeter water, or with any other hotte licour, and cure all those which shalbe burned with hotte yron, or gunpowder.
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An other oyntment to heale scaldings and burnings.
The 109 Chapter. To make a Plaister which will heale without payne any wrenched or broken arme, hande, legge, foote, or ioynte, and all manner of bruses.
The 110 Chapter. How a Gunner cannot mount any peece of Artillerie to make a perfect shoote at a marke without point blanke, except he doe knowe the distance betweene his peece and the marke, and how for the same reason, and also for other causes, the Authour of this Appendix doth shewe in the Chapters following diuers rules concerning the mensuration of Altitudes, Longitudes, Latitudes, and Pro∣fundities, and the platting of fieldes, mynes, and other places.
The 111 Chapter. The bignesse fashion, and vse of an Instrument named a Gunners Semicircle: and of an Instrument named a Geometricall Square.
The 112 Chapter. To take the heigth of the Sunne with a Quadrant drawne within your Geometricall square.
The 113 Chapter. How you may measure at one station in a Sunne shining day with your Geometricall square, and also with an Haulbert or any other staffe perpendiculerly erected, the altitude of any Tower, or other thing whose shadow length is knowne.
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How by the knowen length of a shadow which a Halberte or staffe perpendiculary erected doth giue in a Sunne shining day, you may know the heigth of any Tower or other thing which giueth at the same time a shadow that may be measured.
The 114 Chapter. How you may measure with your Geometricall square at one station any approchable altitutde: also how you may with Arithmeticall skill measure the Hipothenusall distance betweene your said sta∣tion and the top of the said altitude.
The 115 Chapter. How you may measure with your Geometricall square an Hipothenusall distance, and an altitude of a Tower or any other thing perpendicularlie erected.
The 116 Chapter. How you may artificially measure with a Gunners quadrant, and also with a gunners Semicircle, the altitude of any thing perpendicularly erected, although you may not goe to it, nor see the base there∣of: and how you may measure with the same instruments the Hipothenusall distance, and Hori∣zontall distance of that altitude.
The 117 Chapter. To know by the helpe of a Gunners Semicircle how many miles, paces, yardes, or feete, any shippe lying at Rode in the Sea, or Tower, or any other marke vppon the land in sight, is from you.
The 118 Chapter. How you may measure a short distance as the breadth of a towne ditch, or narrow riuer, without any Geometricall Instrument, or arithmeticall knowledge.
The 119 Chapter. How you may at one station measure vppon an heigth with a Geometricall square a longitude vppon plaine.
The 120 Chapter. How you may measure with a Geometricall square at two stations any longitude in sight.
The 121 Chapter. How you may measure with a Geometricall Square, any distance or breadth lying in a plaine & leuel grounde, with your eye or station how so euer the same breadth or distance is scituated.
The 122 Chapter. How you standing vppon the toppe of a hill or drie ditch may measure with a Geome∣tricall Square the deepenesse of the same hill or ditch, and the breadth of any drie ditch or valley.
The 123 Chapter. How you may drawe a platte of any peece of grounde which shall containe the true proportion and Sy∣metrie thereof, in such sorte that you may tel how farre any place in the platte is distante from other.
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