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Author: Swetnam, Joseph, fl. 1617.
Title: The schoole of the noble and worthy science of defence. Being the first of any English-mans inuention, which professed the sayd science; so plainly described, that any man may quickly come to the true knowledge of their weapons, with small paines and little practise. Then reade it aduisedly, and vse the benefit thereof when occasion shal serue, so shalt thou be a good common-wealth man, liue happy to thy selfe, and comfortable to thy friend. Also many other good and profitable precepts and counsels for the managing of quarrels, and ordering thy selfe in many other matters. Written by Ioseph Svvetnam.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The schoole of the noble and worthy science of defence. Being the first of any English-mans inuention, which professed the sayd science; so plainly described, that any man may quickly come to the true knowledge of their weapons, with small paines and little practise. Then reade it aduisedly, and vse the benefit thereof when occasion shal serue, so shalt thou be a good common-wealth man, liue happy to thy selfe, and comfortable to thy friend. Also many other good and profitable precepts and counsels for the managing of quarrels, and ordering thy selfe in many other matters. Written by Ioseph Svvetnam.
Swetnam, Joseph, fl. 1617.

London: Printed by Nicholas Okes, 1617.
Alternate titles: School of defence.
Notes:
Running title reads: The school of defence.
Numerous errors in pagination; page number 137 repeated.
Reproduction of the original in the Bodleian Library.
Subject terms:
Self-defense -- Early works to 1800.
Dueling -- England -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A13248.0001.001

Contents
title page
❧ TO THE HIGH AND MIGHTIE PRINCE CHARLES, PRINCE OF WALES, DVKE OF CORNE∣wale, Yorke, Albany and Rothesay, Marques of Or∣mount Earle of Rosse, and Baron of Armanoch, high Seneschal of Scotland, Lord of the Isles, and Knight of the most Noble order of the Garter.
An Epistle vnto the common Reader.
¶ Vnto all Professors of the Noble and worthie Art of Defence I send greeting.
A Table of the Contents.
❧ This first Chapter sheweth what wepons are chiefly to he learned, with many other prin∣cipall notes worthy obseruation.
CHAP. II. Declaring the difference of sundry mens teaching, with a direction for the entrance into the practise with thy weapons.
CHAP. III. Fearefull examples of murther, with aduise to auoid murther.
CHAP. IIII. which sheweth vnto whom skill belongeth, with the fruits of drunkennesse.
CHAP. V. The cause of quarrells, and what preparation you ought to be prepared with to answer a challenge.
CHAP. VI. Diuerse reasons or introductions to bring thee the better vnto the knowledge of thy weapon.
CHAP. VII. That Feare and Fury are both enemies to true valour.
CHAP. VIII. How the vse of weapons came, also the number of weapons vsed from time to time, with other good instructions.
CHAP. IX. Sheweth what an excellent thing skill is, with per∣swasion to all men to forbeare the maintaining of idle quarrels.
Chap. X. The trickes of a Coward.
CHAP. XI. Questions and Answers. Scholler.
CHAP. XII. Sheweth of seauen principall rules whereon true de∣fence is grounded.
The true guard for the defence, either of blowe, or thrust, with Rapier and Dagger, or Sword and Dagger.
The reasons of this guard.
A thrust may be defended foure waies.
Three manner of waies for the holding of a Rapier.
The manners of a passage.
The danger of a passage is to be presented three waies.
Another defence of a passage.
False play at Rapier and Dagger.
The crosse guard.
The Stokata guard.
The carelesse or the lazie guard.
The fore-hand guard at Rapier and Dagger.
The broad Warde.
The names of the chiefest thrusts, which are vsed at Rapier and Dagger, with the manner how to performe them.
An other thrust called a Reuerse.
A thrust called a Mountanto.
The best way for the holding of a Dagger, either to breake blow or thrust, and foure waies bad as followeth.
Foure waies naught to breake a thrust.
A good way to defend a thrust or blow.
The true guard for the single Rapier.
The Reasons of this guard.
False play at the single Rapier.
Another deceit.
The defence of this false play.
A slippe at single Rapier.
Another slippe.
The defence of this slippe.
Another Slippe.
A dazeling thrust at single Rapier or Backe-sword.
A close at single Rapier or at Backe-sword.
The guard for the Backe-sword.
Another very sure and dangerous guard at the Backe-sword, called the Vnicorne guard, or the fore-hand guard.
A Close at back-sword.
False play with the Back-sword.
Another false play.
Another deceipt.
Another deceipt.
An other verie cunning deceipt with the Back-sword.
A verie dangerous blow at Back-sword.
This blow is also good for a Left-handed man, or against a Left-handed man.
A false thrust to be vsed in fight at Back-sword.
An other dangerous blow.
The true guard for the Staffe, which we will call the Low guard.
The high guard for the Staffe.
The best guard for a darke night at Staffe.
Questions and answeres betwixt the Master and Scholler, concer∣ning the Staffe.
False play to be vsed at the Staffe.
The defence of this false thrust.
A false blowe.
A Slippe at a Staffe.
Another falsifie.
Another very deceiuing false thrust at the Staffe.
The guard for the Sword and Dagger, the which for surenesse wee will call the Castle-guard.
Heere followeth the chiefest blowes at Sword and Dagger, and the maner how to performe them.
Here followeth the false play at Sword and Dagger.
Certaine reasons why thou maist not strike with thy weapon in fight.
The Authors opinion concerning th oddes betwixt a left-handed man, and a right-banded man.
A briefe of my principall points which I would haue thee keepe in continuall re∣membrance.
The Authors opinion concerning the Short Sword and Dagger.
Aguard for the short sword and dagger to encounter against the long Rapier and Dagger, or else the long sword and Dagger.
Obseruations for a Scholler or any other.
CHAP. XII. This Chapter sheweth the seuerall kinde of weapons which are to be plaied at.
My farewell to Plimouth.
The Authors Conclusion.