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Author: Silver, George, fl. 1599.
Title: Paradoxes of defence wherein is proued the true grounds of fight to be in the short auncient weapons, and that the short sword hath aduantage of the long sword or long rapier. And the weakenesse and imperfection of the rapier-fights displayed. Together with an admonition to the noble, ancient, victorious, valiant, and most braue nation of Englishmen, to beware of false teachers of defence, and how they forsake their owne naturall fights: with a briefe commendation of the noble science or exercising of armes. By George Siluer Gentleman.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: Paradoxes of defence wherein is proued the true grounds of fight to be in the short auncient weapons, and that the short sword hath aduantage of the long sword or long rapier. And the weakenesse and imperfection of the rapier-fights displayed. Together with an admonition to the noble, ancient, victorious, valiant, and most braue nation of Englishmen, to beware of false teachers of defence, and how they forsake their owne naturall fights: with a briefe commendation of the noble science or exercising of armes. By George Siluer Gentleman.
Silver, George, fl. 1599.

London: Printed [by Richard Field] for Edvvard Blount, 1599.
Alternate titles: George Siluer his Paradoxes of defence. George Silver his Paradoxes of defence.
Notes:
Printer's name from STC.
The first leaf is blank.
Running title reads: George Siluer his Paradoxes of defence.
The "plate" is a woodcut.
Reproduction of the original in the Folger Shakespeare Library.
Subject terms:
Fencing -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A12246.0001.001

Contents
title page
illustration
TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE, MY SINGVLAR GOOD LORD, ROBERT EARLE OF Essex and Ewe, Earle Marshall of England, Vis∣count Hereford, Lord Ferrers of Chartley, Bourchier and Louaine, Maister of the Queenes Maiesties horse, & of the Ordenance, Chancellor of the Vniuersitie of Cam∣bridge, Knight of the most noble order of the Gar∣ter, and one of her Highnesse most ho∣norable Priuy Counsell.
AN ADMONITION TO THE NOBLE, ANCIENT, VICTORIOVS, VALIANT, AND MOST BRAVE NATION OF ENGLISHMEN.
There are foure especiall markes to know the Italian fight is imperfect & that the Italian teachers and setters forth of books of Defence, neuer had the per∣fection of the true fight.
Of sixe chiefe causes, that many valiant men thinking themselues by their practises to be skilfull in their weapons, are yet manie times in their fight sore hurt, and manie times slaine by men of small skill, or none at all.
What is the cause that wisemen in learning or practising their weapons, are deceiued with Italian Fencers.
Of the false resolutions and vaine opinions of Rapier-men, and of the danger of death thereby ensuing.
That the cause that manie are so often slaine, and manie sore hurt in fight with long Rapiers, is not by reason of their dangerous thrusts, nor cunningnesse of that Italienated fight, but in the length and vnweildinesse thereof.
Of running and standing fast in Rapier fight, the runner hath the vantage.
Of striking and thrusting both together.
George Siluer his resolution vpon that hidden or doubt∣full question, who hath the aduantage of the Offender or Defender.
Of Spanish fight vvith the Rapier.
Illusions for the maintenance of imperfect weapons & false fights, to feare or discourage the vnskilfull in their weapons, from taking a true course or vse, for attaining to the perfect know∣ledge of true fight.
That a blow commeth continually as neare a way as a thrust, and most commonly nearer, stronger, more swifter, and is sooner done.
Perfect fight standeth vpon both blow and thrust, there∣fore the thrust is not onely to be vsed.
That the blow is more dangerous and deadly in fight, then a thrust, for proofe thereof to be made according with Art, an Englishman holdeth argument against an Italian.
Of the difference betwixt the true fight & the false: wher∣in consisteth (the Principles being had with the di∣rection of the foure Gouernors) the whole perfection of fight with all ma∣ner of weapons.
Of euill orders or customes in our English Fēce-schooles, & of the old or ancient teaching of weapons, & things very necessarie to be continued for the auoiding of er∣rors, and reuining and continuance of our ancient vveapons, and most victo∣rious fight againe.
The grounds or Principles of true fight with all maner of weapons.
The wardes of all maner of weapons.
The names and numbers of times appertaining vnto fight both true and false.
The false times be these.
Of the length of weapons, and how euerie man may fit him∣selfe in the perfect length of his weapon, accor∣ding to his owne stature, with briefe rea∣sons wherefore they ought to be so.
Of the lengths of the Battel axe, Halbard, or blacke Bill, or such like vveapons of weight, appertaining vnto gard or battell.
Of the vantages of weapons in their kinds, places, & times, both in priuate and publike fight.
Of the insufficiencie and disaduantages of the Rapiers fight in Battell.
Of the vantages and sufficiencie of the short Sword fight in battell.
That all maner of double weapons, or weapons to be vsed with both handes, haue aduantage against the sin∣gle Rapier or single Sword, there is no question to be made. That the Sword and Buckler hath the vantage a∣gainst the Sword and Dagger.
That the Sword and Buckler hath the vantage against the Sword and Target.
The short Staffe.
The short Staffe hath the vantage against the long staffe, and Morris Pike, and the Forrest bill against all maner of weapons.
Againe of the vantages of weapons.
Againe for the short Staffe or halfe Pike.
Questions and answers betweene the Scholler and the Mai∣ster, of the vantages and disaduantages betweene a tall man, and a man of meane stature, hauing both the perfect knowledge in their weapons.
Of the long single Rapier fight betweene valiant men, ha∣uing both skill, he that it the best wrastler, or if nei∣ther of them can wrastle, the strongest man most commonly killeth the other, or lea∣ueth him at his mercie.
Of the Rapier and Poiniard fight betwixt valiant men, hauing both skill.
Of the long Rapier & Poiniard-fight betweene two valiant men, the one hauing skil, the other none: that he that hath no skill hath the vantage.
Of the long single Rapier, or Rapier and Poiniard-fight be∣tweene two vnskilfull men being valiant.
Of the imperfection and insufficiencie of Rapiers in gene∣rall, of what length soeuer they be.
Of the imperfection and insufficiencie of the fight of the single Rapier, Rapier and Poiniard, Ra∣pier and Buckler, Rapier and Cloke, and Rapier and Gloue of maile.
That the reasons vsed by the Italian Fencers in commen∣ding the vse of the Rapier and Poiniard, because it maketh peace, maketh against themselues.
That the short Sword hath the aduantage against the long Sword or long Rapier.
George Siluer his militarie riddle, truly set downe betweene the Perfection and Imperfection of fight: containing the handling of the foure fights: wherein true consisteth the whole summe and full perfection of the true fight, with all maner of wea∣pons, with an inuicible conclusion.
A BRIEFE NOTE OF THREE ITA∣lian Teachers of Offence.