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Author: Powell, Thomas, 1572?-1635?
Title: The art of thriving. Or, The plaine path-way to preferment. Together with The mysterie and misery of lending and borrowing. As also a table of the expence of time and money. Published for the common good of all sorts, &c.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The art of thriving. Or, The plaine path-way to preferment. Together with The mysterie and misery of lending and borrowing. As also a table of the expence of time and money. Published for the common good of all sorts, &c.
Powell, Thomas, 1572?-1635?, Powell, Thomas, 1572?-1635?.

London: Printed by T[homas] H[arper] for Benjamin Fisher, and are to be sold at his shop at the signe of the Talbot in Aldersgate street, 1635 [i.e. 1636]
Alternate titles: Tom of all trades Tom of all trades. Plaine path-way to preferment.
Notes:
"To the reader" signed: T.P., i.e. Thomas Powell.
The first part originally published in 1631 as: Tom of all trades.
"The mistery and misery of lending and borrowing. By Tho: Powel, Gent.", a reprint of his "Wheresoever you see mee, trust unto your selfe", has separate title page with imprint "London: printed by Thomas Harper for Benjamin Fisher .. 1636"; pagination and register are continuous.
The last leaf is blank.
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
Subject terms:
Success -- Early works to 1800.
Loans -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A09899.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Reader.
The art of Thriving. The Contents.
The art of Thriving: OR, The plaine Path-way to Preferment.
In the first place take your direction for the SCHOLLER.
Next adde certaine helpes for discovery and attaining thereof.
Now suppose your sonne is brought to the Vniversitie by Ele∣ction, or as Pensioner.
And first for the Ministry.
For Benefices abroad.
The Lawes promotions follow BY Civill Law, and Common Law.
The Preferments at which they arrive, are these:
For the Common Law.
The Physitian followes.
Their means of Advance∣ment are in these wayes, viz.
The Apprentice followes.
The Navigator.
The Husbandman.
The Courtiers wayes of advance∣ment be these.
The Souldier followes.
The Land Soldier followes.
Your three Daughters challenge the next place.
For their breeding.
title page
THE MISTERY and misery of Len∣ding and Bor∣rowing.
First, for the Borrower.
Next for the Creditor.
part
The Courtiours method followes.
The Innes of Court-man, and his method.
The Country Gentleman his Mothod
The Citizen, a Redempti∣onary Freeman, his Method.
Their severall cause of insol∣vency followeth.
The sundry wayes and weapons with which they fence with their Credi∣tors, challenge the next place.
The Innes of Courts mans weapons
The Country Gentleman his weapons.
The City borrower his fence.
Their noted places of re∣fuge and retirement followes.
Ram-Alley.
Fulwoods Rents.
Milford Lane.
The Savoy.
Duke Humfrey.
Montague-close.
Ely Rents,
Cold Harbour.
The Fryers.
Great Saint Bartholmewes
The Iubilees and dayes of pri∣viledge follow.
The markes of a conscious cauti∣ous Debtor, with the dis∣cipline of the Mace.
The Discipline now offers it selfe, and the Mace is lifted up, in Terrorem populi
The Creditors part.
For the charitable extent of the Creditors curtesie.
The reasons hereof are all as preg∣nant as pious.
The mystery of Multiplication.
The Signes fore-running the wonderfull Cracke.
And so dismisse we them till then.
The recovery of the old man, with the common comfort which it did beget, hold the next place.
The common Comfort onely remaines.
By the Counsaile of Ramme Ally.