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Author: Petrarca, Francesco, 1304-1374.
Title: Phisicke against fortune, aswell prosperous, as aduerse conteyned in two bookes. Whereby men are instructed, with lyke indifferencie to remedie theyr affections, aswell in tyme of the bryght shynyng sunne of prosperitie, as also of the foule lowryng stormes of aduersitie. Expedient for all men, but most necessary for such as be subiect to any notable insult of eyther extremitie. Written in Latine by Frauncis Petrarch, a most famous poet, and oratour. And now first Englished by Thomas Twyne.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
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Print source: Phisicke against fortune, aswell prosperous, as aduerse conteyned in two bookes. Whereby men are instructed, with lyke indifferencie to remedie theyr affections, aswell in tyme of the bryght shynyng sunne of prosperitie, as also of the foule lowryng stormes of aduersitie. Expedient for all men, but most necessary for such as be subiect to any notable insult of eyther extremitie. Written in Latine by Frauncis Petrarch, a most famous poet, and oratour. And now first Englished by Thomas Twyne.
Petrarca, Francesco, 1304-1374., Twyne, Thomas, 1543-1613,

At London: Printed by [Thomas Dawson for] Richard watkyns, An. Dom. 1579.
Alternate titles: De remediis utriusque fortunae. English De remediis utriusque fortunae.
Notes:
A translation of: De remediis utriusque fortunae.
Actual printer's name from STC.
With three final contents leaves; the last leaf is blank.
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
Subject terms:
Conduct of life -- Early works to 1900.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A09530.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the right woorshypful Maister Richard Bertie Esquier. &c. qui∣etnesse of Conscience, health of Body, continuance of Lyfe, with encrease of worldly VVoorshyp.
book 1
❧ The Epistolare Preface of Fran∣cis Petrarch, a most famous Poet and Oratour, written vnto Azo, con∣cerning the Phisicke and remedies of both Fortunes, aswell aduerse, as prosperous.
¶ Of floorishing yeeres. The first Dialogue.
Of the goodly beautie of the body. The seconde Dialogue.
Of bodily health. The thirde Dialogue.
Of restored health. The fourth Dialogue.
Of bodyly strength. The .v. Dialogue.
Of swiftnesse of the bodye. The syxth Dialogue.
Of wit. The .vii. Dialogue.
Of Memorie. The .viii. Dialogue.
Of Eloquence. The .ix. Dialogue.
Of Vertue. The .x. Dialogue.
Of the opinion of Vertue. The .xi. Dialogue.
Of wysedome. The .xii. Dialogue.
Of Religion. The .xiii. Dialogue.
Of Freedome. The .xiiii. Dialogue.
Of a gloryous Countrey. The xv. Dialogue.
Of an honourable Familie. The .xvi. Dialogue.
Of a fortune beginning. The .xvii. Dialogue.
Of Sumptuous fare The .xviii. Dialogue.
Of Feastes. The .xix. Dialogue.
Of Apparrel. and trimming of the bodye. The .xx. Dialogue.
Of reste and quietnes. The .xxi. Dialogue.
Of pleasaunt smelles. The xxii. Dialogue.
Of the sweeten of Musick xxi Dialogue.
Of Daunsing. The .xxiiii. Dialogue.
Of playing with the Ball. The .xxv. Dialogue.
Of playing at Dice and Lottes. The xxvi. Dialogue.
Of prosperous playing at Tables. The .xxvii. Dialogue.
Of Iesters. The xxviii. Dialogue.
Of the games of VVrestlyng. The xxix. Dialogue.
Of sundrie Spectacles and Shewes. The .xxx. Dialogue.
Of Horses. The .xxxi. Dialogue.
Of hunting and hauking. The .xxxii. Dialogue.
Of great retinue of seruantes. The xxxiii. Dialogue.
Of the magnificencie, and beautifulnesse of houses. The .xxxiiii. Dialogue.
Of stronge defenced Castles. The xxxv. Dialogue.
Of precious housholde stuffe. The xxxvi. Dialogue.
Of Precious stones and Pearles. The .xxxvii. Dialogue.
Of Cuppes made of precious Stones. The xxxviii. Dialogue.
Of Engrauinges and seales in precious Stones. The .xxxix. Dialogue.
Of Pictures, and painted Tables. The .xl. Dialogue.
Of Statues and Images. The .xli. Dialogue.
Of vessels of Corinthe. The .xlii. Dialogue.
Of store of Bookes. The .xliii. Dialogue.
Of the fame of writers. The .xliiii. Dialogue.
Of Maistershyp. The .xlv. Dialogue.
Of sundry titles of Studies. The .xlvi. Dialogue.
Of the Tytles of businesse, and affayres. The .xlvii. Dialogue.
Of titles of warres, warfare, and Cheiftein∣ship. The xlviii. Dialogue.
Of the friendshyppe of Kynges. The xlix. Dialogue.
Of the abundaunce of friendes. The .L. Dialogue.
Of Friendes not knowen, but by report. The. Li. Dialogue.
Of one only faythfull Freende. The .Lii. Dialogue.
Of plentie of Ryches. The .liii. Dialogue.
Of finding of a golde min. The .liiii. Dialogue.
Of the fyndyng of Treasure. The .lv. Dialogue.
Of Vsurie. The .lvi. Dialogue.
Of fruitefull, and well tylled lande. The lvii. Dialogue.
Of pleasaunt greene VValkes. The Lviii. Dialogue.
Of Flockes and Heardes of Cattle. The .Lix. Dialogue.
Of Elephantes and Camels. The .Lx. Dialogue.
Of Apes, and other beastes of pleasure. The .Lxi. Dialogue.
Of Peacockes, Chyckens, Hennes, Bees, and Pigions The .Lxii. Dialogue.
Of Fyshpondes. The .lxiii. Dialogue.
Of Cages of byrdes, and of speaking and singing byrdes. The .lxiiii. Dialogue.
Of the woorthinesse of Marriage. The .Lxv. Dialogue.
Of a fayre VVyfe. The .Lxvi. Dialogue.
Of a fruitefull and eloquent VVyfe. The .Lxvii. Dialogue.
Of a great Dowrie. The .Lxviii. Dialogue.
Of pleasant loue. The Lxix. Dialogue.
Of the byrth of chyldren. The .lxx. Dialogue.
Of a pleasant young childe. The .lxxi. Dialogue.
Of the excellent fauour of Chyldren. The .Lxxii. Dialogue.
Of the valiencie and magnanimitie of a Sonne. The .Lxxiii. Dialogue.
Of the Daughters chastitie, The .Lxxiiii. Dialogue.
Of a good sonne in Lawe. The .Lxxv. Dialogue.
Of seconde Marriage. The .Lxxvi. Dialogue.
Of the marriage of Chyldren. The .Lxxvii. Dialogue.
Of Nephues. The .lxxviii. Dialogue.
Of adopted chyldren, husbandes children by a former wyfe, and wyues children by a former husbande, The .lxxix. Dialogue.
Of an excellent Schoolmaister. The .lxxx. Dialogue.
Of a notable Sholar. The .lxxxi. Dialogue.
Of a good Father. The .Lxxxii. Dialogue.
Of a most louing Mother. The .Lxxxiii. Dialogue.
Of good Brethren, and louing and fayre Sisters. The .Lxxxiiii. Dialogue.
Of a good Lord. The .Lxxxv. Dialogue.
Of the clearenesse of the Ayre. The lxxxvi. Dialogue.
Of fortunate sayling. The .lxxxvii. Dialogue.
Of wisshed arryuyng at the Hauen. The .lxxxviii. Dialogue.
Of comming foorth of prison. The .lxxxix. Dialogue.
Of a quiet State. The .xc. Dialogue.
Of Power. The .xci. Dialogue.
Of Glorie. The .xcii. Dialogue.
Of Benefites bestowed vpon many. The .xciii. Dialogue.
Of loue of the people. The .xciiii. Dialogue.
Of inuadyng a Tirranny. The xcv. Dialogue.
Of a Kyngdome and Empire. The .xcvi. Dialogue.
Of a furnished Armie. The .xcvii. Dialogue.
Of a well appoynted Nauie. The .xcviii. Diaalogue.
Of Engines and Artillerie. The .xcix Dialogue.
Of Treasure layde vp in store. The .C. Dialogue.
Of reuenge. The .Ci. Dialogue.
Of hope to VVinne. The .Cii. Dialogue.
Of Victorie. The .Ciii. Dialogue.
Of the death of an Enimie. The .Ciiii. Dialogue.
Of hope of Peace. The .Cv. Dialogue.
Of peace and truice. The .Cvi. Dialogue.
Of the Popedome. The .Cvii. Dialogue.
Of happinesse. The .Cviii. Dialogue.
Of good Hope. The .Cix. Dialogue.
Of expectation of Inheritaunce. The .Cx. Dialogue.
Of Alchimie. The .Cxi. Dialogue.
Of the promises of VVysemen, and Southsayers. The .Cxii. Dialogue.
Of glad tidings. The. Cxiii. Dialogue.
Of expecting a mans sonne, or Farmer, or wyfe. The .Cxiiii. Dialogue.
Of looking for better tymes. The .Cxv. Dialogue.
Of the hoped commyng of a Prince. The .Cxvi. Dialogue.
Of hope of Fame after death. The .Cxvii. Dialogue.
Of Glorie hoped for by buyldyng. The .Cxviii. Dialogue.
Of glory hoped for by keeping Companie. The .Cxix. Dialogue.
Of manyfolde hope. The Cxx. Dialogue.
Of hoped quietnesse of mynde. The .Cxxi. Dialogue.
Of the hope of lyfe euerlastyng. The .Cxxii. Dialogue.
book 2
The Epistolare Preface of Frauncis Petrarche, a most famous Poet and Oratour, into the second booke of his woorke of Physicke against Fortune, wherein he disputeth of Aduer∣sitie.
Of deformitie of the bodie. The first Dialogue.
Of weakenesse. The ii. Dialogue.
Of sicknesse, The iii. Dialogue.
Of a base Countrie. The iiii. Dialogue.
Of basenesse of stocke. The v. Dialogue.
Of a shamefull byrth. The vi. Dialogue.
Of Bondage. The vii. Dialogue.
Of pouertie. The .viii. Dialogue.
Of Domage sustayned. The .ix. Dialogue.
Of thinne Fare. The x. Dialogue.
Of Original Pouertie. The .xi. Dialogue.
Of the heauie burden of many chyldren. The .xii. Dialogue.
Of money lost. The .xiii. Dialogue.
Of Suretishyp. The .xiiii. Dialogue.
Of losse of tyme. The .xv. Dialogue.
Of vnfortunate playing at Tables. The xvi. Dialogue.
Of her vnto whom one was assured, iudged vnto another. The .xvii. Dialogue.
Of the losse of a mans wyfe. The .xviii. Dialogue.
Of a shrewyshe wyfe. The .xix. Dialogue.
Of the stealing away of a mans wyfe. The .xx. Dialogue.
Of an vnchast wife. The .xxi. Dialogue.
Of a barren VVyfe. The .xxij. Dialogue.
Of an vnchast Daughter. The xxiij. Dialogue.
Of shame commyng from another. The .xxiiij. Dialogue.
Of Infamie. The .xxv. Dialogue.
Of shame procured by meanes of vnwoor∣thy commendation. The xxvi. Dialogue.
Of vnfaythfull friendes. The .xxvij. Dialogue.
Of vnthankeful persons. The .xxviij. Dialogue.
Of euil seruauntes. The .xxix. Dialogue,
Of fugityue seruauntes, The .xxx. Dialogue.
Of importunate Neyghbours. The .xxxi. Dialogue.
Of Enimies. The xxxij. Dialogue.
Of occasion lost to reuenge. The .xxxiij. Dialogue.
Of the peoples hatred. The .xxxiiij. Dialogue.
Of enuie, passiuely. The .xxxv. Dialogue.
Of Contempt. The .xxxvj. Dialogue.
Of long expectyng a promised rewarde. The .xxxvii. Dialogue.
Of Repulses. The xxxviii. Dialogu. e
Of an vniust Lorde. The .xxxix. Dialogue.
Of an vnlearned Scholemaister. The .xl. Dialogue.
Of an vnapt and proude Scholar. The .xlj. Dialogue.
Of a Stepdame. The .xlij. Dialogue.
Of the hardnesse of a Father. The .xliij. Dialogue.
Of a stubberne sonne. The .xliiij. Dialogue.
Of a contentious brother. The .xlv. Dilalogue.
Of the losse of a father. The .xlvi. Dialogue.
Of the losse of a mother. The xlvii. Dialogue.
Of the losse of a sonne. The xlviii. Dialogue.
Of the miserable fal of a young child. The .xlix. Dialogue.
Of a sonne that is found to be another mans. The .l. Dialogue.
Of the losse of a brother. The .Lj. Dialogue.
Of the death of a freende. The .Lij. Dialogue.
Of the absence of friendes. The .Liij. Dialogue
Of greeuous shypwracke. The liiii. Dialogue.
Of Burnyng. The .lv. Dialogue.
Of great laboure and traueyle. The .lvi Dialogue.
Of a painful iourney. The lvii. Dialogue.
Of one yeeres barrennesse. The .Lviij. Dialogue.
Of an euyll and proude Bayliffe. The .Lix. Dialogue.
Of Thefte. The .Lx. Dialogue
Of robberies. The .lxi. Dialogue.
Of Coosinage and deceit. The .lxii. Dialogue.
Of a streight and narow dwelling. The .lxiii. Dialogue.
Of a prison. The .lxiiii. Dialogue.
Of Tormentes. The .lxv. Dialogue.
Of vniust iudgement. The .Lxvj. Dialogue.
Of Banishment. The .Lxvij. Dialogue.
Of a mans country besiged. The .lxviii. Dialogue.
Of a mans countrey destroyed. The lxix. Dialogue.
Of the feare of loosing in warre. The .lxx. Dialogue.
Of a foolyshe and rashe felow in office. The .lxxi .Dialogue.
Of an vndiscreet and hastie Marshal of the feelde. The .lxxii. Dialogue.
Of vnfortunate successe in battayle. The .Lxxiij. Dialogue.
Of Ciuile warre. The .Lxxiiij. Dialogue.
Of the disagreement of a waueryng minde. The .Lxxv. Dialogue.
Of a doubtful state. The .lxxvi. Dialogue.
Of woundes receyued, The .lxxvii. Dialogue.
Of a kyng without a sonne. The .lxxviii. Dialogue.
Of a kyngdome lost. The .lxxix. Dialogue.
Of Treason. The .Lxxx. Dialogue.
Of the losse of a Tyrannie. The .Lxxxj. Dialogue.
Of Castles lost. The .Lxxxij. Dialogue.
Of olde age. The .lxxxiii. Dialogue.
Of the Gout. The .Lxxxiiij. Dialogue.
Of Scabbes. The .Lxxxv. Dialogue.
Of watching. The .lxxxvi. Dialogue.
Of the vnquietnesse of dreames. The .lxxxvii. Dialogue.
Of Importunate renowme. The .lxxxviii. Dialogue.
Of sorowe conceyued for the euyl maners of men. The .lxxxix. Dialogue.
Of small greefes of sundrie thynges. The .XC. Dialogue.
Of an earthquake. The .xci. Dialogue
Of the plague farre and wide raging. The .xcii. Dialogue.
Of sadnesse and miserie. The .xciii. Dialogue.
Of the Toothache. The .XCiiij. Dialogue.
Of payne in the legges. The .xcv. Dialogue.
Of Blyndnesse. The .xcvi. Dialogue.
Of the losse of hearyng. The .XCvij. Dialogue.
Of the lothsomnesse of lyfe. The .XCviij. Dialogue.
Of heauinesse of the bodye. The .XCix. Dialogue.
Of great dulnesse of witte. The .C. Dialogue.
Of a slender and weake memorie. The .Cj. Dialogue.
Of lacke of eloquence. The .cii. Dialogue.
Of losse of the tongue and speeche. The .ciii. Dialogue.
Of want of vertue. The .ciiii. Dialogue.
Of couetousnesse. The .Cv. Dialogue.
Of enuie and malice. The .Cvj. Dialogue.
Of wrath. The .Cvij. Dialogue.
Of Gluttonie. The .Cviij. Dialogue.
Of sluggyshnesse of the minde. The .Cjx. Dialogue.
Of Letcherie. The .Cx. Dialogue.
Of Pryde. The .Cxj. Dialogue.
Of Agues. The .cxii. Dialogue.
Of the payne of the guttes, and Traunce. The .cxiii Dialogue.
Of sundry paynes and greefes of the whole body. The .cxiiii. Dialogue.
Of Madnesse. The .cxv. Dialogue.
Of Poyson. The .cxvi. Dialogue.
Of the feare of death. The .cxvii. Dialogue.
Of Voluntarie murthering a mans owne selfe. The .Cxviij. Dialogue.
Of Death. The .cxix. Dialogue.
Of Death before a mans tyme. The .Cxx. Dialogue.
Of a Violent death. The .Cxxj. Dialogue.
Of a shameful death. The .cxxii. Dialogue.
Of a suddayne death. The .cxxiii. Dialogue.
Of one that is sicke out of his owne countrey. The .cxxiiii. Dialogue.
Of one that dyeth out of his owne cuntrey. The .cxxv. Dialogue.
Of one that dyeth in Sinne. The .Cxxvj. Dialogue.
Of one dying, that is careful what shalbecome of his inheritance and children. The .Cxxvii. Dialogue.
Of one dying, that is careful what his wyfe wil do when he is dead. The .cxxviii. Dialogue.
Of one dying, that is careful what wyl become of his countrey after his deceasse. The .cxxix. Dialogue.
Of one that at his death is carefull of his fame and good report. The .Cxxx. Dialogue.
Of one that dyeth without Children. The .Cxxxj. Dialogue.
Of one dying, that feareth to be throwne foorth vnburied. The .Cxxxii. Dialogue.
colophon
A Table of the matters conteined in the fyrst booke of this woorke.
The Table of the matters conteyned in the second Booke of this woorke.