For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: Perrott, James, Sir, 1571-1637.
Title: The first part of the consideration of humane condition vvherin is contained the morall consideration of a mans selfe: as what, who, and what manner of man he is. Written by I.P. Esquier.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2012 November (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further information or permissions.

Print source: The first part of the consideration of humane condition vvherin is contained the morall consideration of a mans selfe: as what, who, and what manner of man he is. Written by I.P. Esquier.
Perrott, James, Sir, 1571-1637.

At Oxford: Printed by Joseph Barnes, and are to be sold [by J. Broome in London] in Paules Church-yard, at the signe of the Bible, 1600.
Alternate titles: Consideration of humane condition.
Notes:
"To the indifferent and friendly reader" signed: Iames Perrott.
Running title reads: The consideration of humane condition.
No more published.
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
Subject terms:
Psychology -- Early works to 1800.
Christian life -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A09490.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE RIGHT HONORABLE, HIS VERY ESPECIAL GOOD LORD, THOMAS Baron of Buckhurst, Lord Treasurer of Eng∣land, one of the LL. of her Maiesties most Honorable privie Counsaile, Knight of the Honorable Order of the Garter, and Chauncellour of the Ʋniversitie of Oxford, I.P. wisheth encrease of honour and eternall faelicitie.
To the indifferent and friendly Reader.
treatise
THE CONSIDERATION of humane Condition.
CHAP. 1. How necessary, and what Con∣sideration is.
CHAP. 2. Why some men are more given to Considera∣tion then others.
CHAP. 3. Ʋnto what we shoulde apply the scope of our Consideration.
CHAP. 4. The Consideration of thy selfe what thou are in thy Creation.
CHAP. 5. The Consideration of thy selfe what thou art in thy Con∣ception, and naturall Constitution.
CHAP. 6. The Consideration of thy selfe what thou art in the fruition of this short and vncertaine life.
CHAP. 7. The Consideration vvhat thou art in the frui∣tion of so painfull a life.
CHAP. 8. The Consideration what thou arte in thy death, and manner of dying.
The Conclusion of this first parte of the first pointe of Considera∣tion concerning thy selfe, ƲƲhat then arte.
The Consideration THE SECOND SECTION OF the first part of the Consideration of humane Condition.
CHAP. 1. The Consideration of thy selfe, who thou art.
CHAP. 2. The Consideration of thy selfe, vvho thou arte in the state of thy body.
CHAP. 3. The Consideration of thy selfe vvhat, and vvho thou art in the state of thy vvealth and riches.
CHAP. 4. The Consideration of thy selfe, who thou art in the state of thy calling and Authoritie.
THE THIRD SECTION OF the first part of the Consideration of humane Condition.
CHAP. 1. The Consideration of thy selfe what manner of man thou art, first as touching thy learning.
The consideration of thy selfe what manner of man thou art in thy vvisedome. CHAP. 2.
CHAP. 3. The Consideration of thy selfe, what manner of man thou art touching the perturbations of the minde.