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Author: Oliver, Thomas, d. 1624.
Title: A new handling of the planisphere diuided into three sections. In the first is a plaine and sensible explication of the circles of the sphere, and such termes as appertaine vnto the doctrine de primo mobili ... The second sheweth how vpon any plaine ... hauing one circle diuided into degrees, and crossed vvith tvvo diameters at right angles, most conclusions of the astrolabe may for all latitudes or countries be readily and exactly performed onely vvith ruler and compasses. In the third, being a supplement organicall, is contained the making of certaine easie instruments for the perfecter working the former conclusions, as to know what degrees and minutes be in any circumference giuen ... Pleasant and profitable generally for all men, but especially such as vvould get handines in vsing the ruler and compasse ... vvithout being at the charge of costly instruments. Inuented for the most part, and first published in English by Thomas Olyuer.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A new handling of the planisphere diuided into three sections. In the first is a plaine and sensible explication of the circles of the sphere, and such termes as appertaine vnto the doctrine de primo mobili ... The second sheweth how vpon any plaine ... hauing one circle diuided into degrees, and crossed vvith tvvo diameters at right angles, most conclusions of the astrolabe may for all latitudes or countries be readily and exactly performed onely vvith ruler and compasses. In the third, being a supplement organicall, is contained the making of certaine easie instruments for the perfecter working the former conclusions, as to know what degrees and minutes be in any circumference giuen ... Pleasant and profitable generally for all men, but especially such as vvould get handines in vsing the ruler and compasse ... vvithout being at the charge of costly instruments. Inuented for the most part, and first published in English by Thomas Olyuer.
Oliver, Thomas, d. 1624.

At London: Imprinted by Felix Kyngston, for Simon Waterson and Rafe Iacson, 1601.
Notes:
The last leaf contains an illustration intended to cancel that on p. 35.
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
Subject terms:
Planispheres -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A08487.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE RIGHT WORSHIPFVL SIR IOHN PETER KNIGHT, at Thornedon in Essex.
To the Reader.
A new handling of the Planisphere.
THE FIRST SECTION, WHERE∣in is contained a plaine and sensible declaration of the circles of the Sphere, and the termes vsed in the doctrine de primo mobili, after another Me∣thode than is yet in any other language.
Parergon primum. What moneth, and what day of it, the Sunne en∣treth euery signe of the Zodiacke.
Parergon secundum. To know the Sunnes place in the Zodiacke vpon any day giuen.
Parergon tertium. The place of the Sunne being giuen, to finde the day of the moneth.
THE SECOND SEC∣TION OF THE NEW HANDLING THE PLANISPHERE; SHEWING HOW THE CON∣clusions of the Astrolabe may readily and exact∣ly for any Countrie be performed onely with Ruler and Compasses.
The first Conclusion. To take the height of the Sunne, or any Starre, a∣boue the Horizon.
The second Conclusion. To finde the distance of the Sunnes or any Starres Azimute, from any determinate poynt in the Horizon.
The third Conclusion. From a point giuen in the circumference of a circle, at any side assigned, to applie or subtend a di∣stance or a right line not greater than the Dia∣meter.
The fourth Conclusion. From a point giuen in any circles circumference, to take at any side assigned, an arch equall to any arch giuen in the same, or any equall circle.
The fift Conclusion. The heights or Almicanters, together with the di∣stance betweene the Azimutes of any two Stars giuen, or taken by obseruation, to finde the di∣stance one from another.
The sixt Conclusion. In any Countrie vnknowne to finde the Diameter of the Parallel of the Sunne, or any vnknowne Starre.
The seuenth Conclusion. The Diameter of the Sunnes, or any Starres parallel being giuen, to finde the declination.
The eight Conclusion. The declination of the Sunne, or any Starre being giuen, together with the Azimute and anie height, to finde the Meridian height.
A Lemma.
The ninth Conclusion. In any Countrie vnknowne, two different heights with the Azimutes of the Sunne, or any knowne Star being giuen, to finde their Meridian height, and declination.
The tenth Conclusion. The Meridian height & declination of the Sunne, or any Starre being giuen, to finde the latitude.
The eleuenth Conclusion. The declination of the Sunne or any knowne Starre being giuen, in a Countrie of knowne latitude, to find the Meridian height.
The twelfth Conclusion. The Meridian height of the Sunne, or any Starre being giuen, in a Countrie of knowne latitude, to finde the Declination.
The thirteenth Conclusion. In a Countrie of knowne latitude, the declination, and height of the Sunne or any knowne Starre being giuen, to finde the Azimute.
The fourteenth Conclusion. In a Countrie of knowne latitude, the Azimute and declination of the Sunne, or any Starre beeing giuen, to finde the height.
The fifteenth Conclusion. In a Countrie of knowen latitude the Azimute, and height of the Sunne, or any Starre being giuen, to finde the declination.
The sixteenth Conclusion. The Sunnes declination being giuen, to finde his place in the Zodiacke.
The seuenteenth Conclusion. Another way to finde the Sunnes place by his de∣clination giuen.
The eighteenth Conclusion. The Sunnes place in the Zodiacke being giuen, to finde his declination.
The nineteenth Conclusion. Another way to finde the Sunnes declination by his place giuen.
The twentith Conclusion. The Sunnes declination being giuen, to finde his right Ascension.
The 21. Conclusion. The right ascension of any point in the Zodiake be∣ing giuen, to finde the Meridian angle.
The 22. Conclusion. The right ascension of the Sunne being giuen, to finde his place in the Zodiacke.
The 23. Conclusion. The Sunnes right ascension being giuen, to finde his declination.
The 24. Conclusion. The declination of any starre being giuen, with his latitude, which neuer altereth, to finde his longi∣tude or place in the Zodiacke.
The 25. Conclusion. The declination of any starre being giuen, with his latitude, which neuer altereth, to finde the right Ascension thereof.
The 26. Conclusion. The longitude and latitude of any starre being gi∣uen, to finde the declination and right Ascension thereof.
The 27. Conclusion. The declination and right ascension of any starre being giuen, to finde the longitude and latitude thereof.
The 28. Conclusion. The longitudes and latitudes of any two starres, or any two places in the earth being giuen, to finde the distance of the one from the other.
The 29. Conclusion. The Latitudes and distance of any two Starres, or a∣ny two places in the Earth being giuen, to finde the difference of their Longitudes.
The 30. Conclusion. The Longitudes and Latitudes of any two Starres, or any two places in the Earth being giuen, to finde the angle of Position, or the bearing of the one from the other.
The 31. Conclusion. The Latitude of one Starre, or one place in the Earth being giuen, with the distance, and angle of position, or bearing towards another, to finde the Latitude of this other, and the difference of their Longitudes.
Adnotandum.
A Caution.
The 32. Conclusion. Another way to finde the distance of two Starres, or places in the Earth, hauing their Latitudes, and the difference of their Longitudes giuen.
The 33. Conclusion. The longitudes and latitudes of any three Starres, or any three places in the earth being giuen, to knowe whether they bee in one greatest circle or no.
The 34. Conclusion. Any vnknowne starre being seene, to find the right ascension and declination of it.
The 35. Conclusion. The latitude or amplitude of the Sunnes or anie knowne Starres rising being giuen with their de∣clination, to knowe the height of the Pole.
The 36. Conclusion. In a Countrie of knowne Latitude, the declination of the Sunne or any Starre being giuen, to know the amplitude or Latitude of rising.
The 37. Conclusion. In a Countrie of knowne Latitude, the Amplitude or Latitude of the Sunnes or any Starres rising being giuen, to finde the Declination.
The 38. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude, the declination of the Sunne or any Starre being giuen, to finde the Semidiurnall arch, or halfe the time it conti∣nueth aboue the Horizon.
A Corollarie.
The 39. Conclusion. The declination and Semidiurnall arch of the Sun, or any Starre being giuen, to finde the height of the Pole.
The 40. Conclusion. By two knowne Starres, whereof the one is in the Meridian, the other in the Horizon, to knowe the height of the Pole or Latitude.
The 41. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude, the height and declination of the Sunne being giuen, to knowe the houre of the day, or what it is a clocke.
A Caution.
The 42. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude, the Azimute and declination of the Sunne being giuen, to find the houre of the day.
The 43. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude, the height and declination of any Starre being giuen, to find the houre of the night.
The 44. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude, the Azimute and declination of any Starre being giuen, to know the houre of the night.
The 45. Conclusion. Any day of the yeare in a Countrey of knowne La∣titude, to finde the beginning, continuance, and ende of the Crepusculum, that is, the dawning in the morning, and twy-light in the euening.
The 46. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude any day in the yeare at any houre assigned, to know the height of the Sunne.
The 47. Conclusion. In a Countrie of known latitude, for any day of the yeere, to finde in what Azimute the Sunne is in.
The 48. Conclusion. In a countrie of knowne Latitude any day of the yeare at any houre assigned, to know how far any determinate point is distant from the Meridian.
The 49. Conclusion In a Countrey of knowne Latitude at any houre as∣signed any day of the yeere, to know the height of any knowne Starre.
The 50. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude at any houre as∣signed any day of the yeare, to know the Azimute of any knowne Starre.
The 51. Conclusion. In a Countrie of knowne Latitude, to finde the dif∣ference Ascensional, or the difference of the right and oblique ascension of any poynt of the Eclip∣ticke or any knowne Starre.
The 52. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude to finde the ob∣lique ascension of any poynt of the Eclipticke, or any knowne Starre.
A Corollary.
Another Corollary.
The 53. Conclusion. The oblique Ascension of any poynt of the Eclip∣ticke, or any knowne Starre being giuen, to finde the Latitude.
The 54. Conclusion. In a Countrey of known Latitude, any day assigned to knowe what poynt of the Eclipticke is in the Meridian in the morning.
The 55. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude any day of the yeere, at any houre assigned, to finde what poynt of the Eclipticke is in the Meridian.
The 56. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude any day of the yeere, to know what time any poynt of the Eclip∣ticke, or any knowne Starre riseth or setteth.
The 57. Conclusion. In a Countrey of knowne Latitude to know with what poynt of the Eclipticke, any knowne Starre commeth to the Meridian.
The 58. Conclusion. The oblique ascension being giuen, to know the si∣tuation of the Equinoctiall sections in respect of the Meridian.
The 59. Conclusion. In a Countrey of known Latitude to know the Ho∣rizontall angle, made by the Section of the Hori∣zon and Eclipticke in any poynt giuen.
To the Reader.
THE THIRD SEC∣TION OF THE NEW HAND∣LING OF THE PLANISPHERE; WHICH IS A SVPPLEMENT Organicall.
CHAP. 1. To make a Quadrant, whereby you may readisie know what Degrees and Minutes are contained in any Circumference giuen.
To finde what degrees and minutes are contained in any circumference giuen.
CHAP. 2. To describe a triangle for enlarging or contracting of Scales, and assigning any parts, or proportion giuen in any rightline.
To cut from a right line giuen any part appointed.
A Corollary.
Another Corollary.
CHAP. 3. Of the Meridian line, the variation of the Compasse and the height of the Pole.
A lemma About a Circle giuen to describe a Quadrant.
The vse and making of an instrument tractable as well at Sea, as at Land, wherein the shadow of the Sunne shall at one instant poynt out his magneti∣call Azimute and height.
By the instrument now described, at noone tyde in any Countrey to finde the Meridian line, the va∣riation of the Compasse, and (hauing the Sunnes declination giuen) the height of the Pole.
By the same instrument two obseruations being ta∣ken; when the Sun hath equall altitudes, to finde the Meridian line, the variation of the compasse, and (the Sunnes declination beeing giuen) the height of the Pole.
By the same instrument three obseruations beeing taken, whereof two bee, when the Sunne hath e∣quall altitudes, to finde the Meridian line, the va∣riation of the Compasse, the declination of the Sunne, and the height of the Pole.
By the same instrument three obseruations being ta∣ken howsoeuer, to finde the Meridian line, the va∣riation of the Compasse, the declination of the Sunne, and the height of the Pole.
The Sunnes declination beeing giuen with the height of the pole, to finde the Meridian line by one obseruation.
CHAP. 4. Of Mappes or Chartes and Nauticall directions.
Anie line being giuen, to finde another line, vnto which the line giuen shall haue that proportion, that the Meridian hath to any Parallell.
To deuide any line, or the side of your quadrant, or your ruler as that line is deuided, which in Ge∣rard Mercators Generall mappe, and his directo∣rium doth answere the Meridian.
The Longitudes and Latitudes of any two places being giuen, to finde their direction, commonlie called the Rumbe.
CHAP. 5. Of the backe of your plate.
To inscribe in the backe of your plate the fixed stars according to their Longitudes and Latitudes, or declinations and right ascensions, as you please.
To finde the longitude and latitude, or the declina∣tion and right ascension of such stars as bee pla∣ced on the back of the plate.
table
Errata.