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Author: Norton, Robert, d. 1635.
Title: A mathematicall apendix,[sic] containing many propositions and conclusions mathematicall: with necessary obseruations both for mariners at sea, and for cherographers and surueyors of land; together with an easie perspectiue mechanicall way, to deline at sunne dyalls vpon any wall or plane giuen, be it direct, inclyning, declyning, or reclyning, for the horizon, or meridian, in any region or place of knovvne latitude. With other things pleasant and profitable for the weale publick, not heretofore extant in our vulgar: partly collected out of foreigne moderne writers, and partlie inuented and practised by the author. Written by R.N. Gent.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A mathematicall apendix,[sic] containing many propositions and conclusions mathematicall: with necessary obseruations both for mariners at sea, and for cherographers and surueyors of land; together with an easie perspectiue mechanicall way, to deline at sunne dyalls vpon any wall or plane giuen, be it direct, inclyning, declyning, or reclyning, for the horizon, or meridian, in any region or place of knovvne latitude. With other things pleasant and profitable for the weale publick, not heretofore extant in our vulgar: partly collected out of foreigne moderne writers, and partlie inuented and practised by the author. Written by R.N. Gent.
Norton, Robert, d. 1635.

London: Printed by R. B[radock?] for Roger Iackson, and are to be sold at his shoppe in Fleet-street, ne[ar the con]duit, 1604.
Alternate titles: Mathematicall apendix. Mathematicall appendix.
Notes:
Epistle dedicatorie signed: Robert Norton.
Suggested printer's name from STC. Title page lacuna conjectured from STC, volume 3, p. 89.
Running title reads: A mathematicall appendix.
Imperfect; title page torn, affecting imprint.
Reproduction of the original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
Longitude -- Early works to 1800.
Sundials -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A08349.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE RIGHT HO∣NORABLE MY SINGV∣LER GOOD LORD AND MA∣ster, Sir EDVVARD SEYMOVR Knight, Baron Beauchamp, Earle of Hertford, and his Maiesties Liuetenant within the Counties of Somerset, and Wiltess, and the City and County of Bristoll.
preface
A Table containing the conten's of the Propositions of this Booke.
text
The first Proposition. How to find the Longitudes of places, by the daylie Decli∣nation of the Sun.
The second Proposition. How to find the Longitudes by Arches of great Circles, which passe by the Centres of the fixed Starres, and such of the Planets as yeelde no sensible paralax or difference of aspect.
Corollary. I.
Corollarie. II.
The third Proposition. A Comet, or the Moone appearing, to find the Paralax or difference of aspect thereof, and thereby the distance of the same aboue the Centre or Circumference of the Earth.
The fourth Proposition. The Paralax, and distance of any Star from the Earth, giuen, to find the true angle it wil make in the Centre of the Earth, with any Star that yeelds no Paralax.
The fift Proposition. To find the Longitude of any place, by a Comet, or the Moone, appearing, and the difference of tyme from one Meridian to another.
Corollarie.
The sixt Proposition. A Star in heauen propounded, to find the Longitudes of places, without the difference of tyme.
The Seuenth Proposition. How to find the Longitude and Latitude, at once, by the Coelestiall bodies, without obseruing the difference of tyme.
The Eighth Proposition. How to find the Longitude Mechanically, & to describe al the notable places in a Region or Country, on a Map or Plat, according to theyr true situations and distan∣ces one from another.
The practise and vse of the Protractor followeth.
A Corollary.
Corollarie. II.
Annotatio. How the Master or Pylot at Sea may, with any Instru∣ment, much more exactly obserue the Coelestial lumina∣ries, then the ordinary manner can admitte.
The making of the Cosmodelite, an excellent Instru∣ment for many Mathematical practises in Astronomy, Geometry, and Cosmography, viz, for the finding of the Longitude of any place; To take any Altitude Latitude or distance within the Angle of sight; To make a Map or Plat of any Country, Mannor, field, fortification or Towne; To delineate Sun dialls vpon all planes giuen, with great facility, inuented by the Author.
How by the helpe of the Cosmodelite to delineate a Sunne Diall, on any Plane giuen, with great facility & with¦out the vse of Arithmetick.
Master Robert Smyth his intention to delineate a Sun Dialll on any Plane in any one Paralel giuen, with a Instrument of sleight charge.
The making of an artificiall Engine, whereby with a small strength giuen, you may lift vp any ponderous weight assigned
Briefe Expositions of the Geometricall and Astronomicall tearmes mentioned in this Treatise.
Faultes escaped, in the originall Copie, it selfe.