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Author: Molinier, Étienne, d. 1650.
Title: A mirrour for Christian states: or, A table of politick vertues considerable amongst Christians. Divided, into three bookes. Reviewed, and augmented, by E. Molinier, of Tolose priest, and Doctor of Divinitie. And by him dedicated, ro [sic] the most illustrious lord, the Lord Cardinall of Valette, Archbishop of Tolose. Translated into English, by VVilliam Tyrvvhit, Sen. Esquire.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 December (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A mirrour for Christian states: or, A table of politick vertues considerable amongst Christians. Divided, into three bookes. Reviewed, and augmented, by E. Molinier, of Tolose priest, and Doctor of Divinitie. And by him dedicated, ro [sic] the most illustrious lord, the Lord Cardinall of Valette, Archbishop of Tolose. Translated into English, by VVilliam Tyrvvhit, Sen. Esquire.
Molinier, Étienne, d. 1650., Tyrwhit, William,

London: Printed by Thom. Harper, 1635.
Alternate titles: Politiques chrestiennes. English Les politiques chrestiennes. Table of politick vertues considerable amongst Christians.
Notes:
A translation of: Molinier, Étienne. Les politiques chrestiennes.
Reproduction of the original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
Political ethics -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A07610.0001.001

Contents
title page
license to print
TO THE RIGHT ILLV∣strious Prince, IAMES STEVVART: Duke of Lenox, Earle of March, Lord Darnley, Aubigney, Torbolton, and Methuen, Baron of Leighton, Bromswoulde, Knight of the most noble Order of the Gar∣ter, and one of his Majesties most Honorable Privie-Coun∣cell.
To the Reader.
TO THE MOST ILLVSTRI∣OVS, AND RIGHT REVEREND FATHER, MY LORD; THE CAR∣DINALL OF VALETTE, ARCHBISHOP OF TOLOSE.
TO THE READER.
THE TABLE OF THE CHAPTERS.
The First Booke. Of Vertues forming a Politick Sufficiency.
The Second Booke. Of those Vertues which forme ho∣nesty, and Integrity for the Right employment of sufficiency.
The Third Booke. Of those Vertues and Qualities, which give vigour and gracefulnesse in matter of Execution of Of∣fices.
CHRISTIAN POLITICKS.
The first Booke. Of those vertues which make a Politicke sufficiencie.
CHAP. I. The Preface and division of all this worke into three members or parts.
CHAP. 2. Of Politick Wisedome.
CHAP. III. That Politick Wisdome is rare, and what parts are requisite for the framing thereof.
CHAP. 4. That true Politicall wisedome is to be received from God and heaven, against the Machievalists.
CHAP. 5. Reasons to prove the same.
CHAP. 6. The sequel of the same Subject.
CHAP. 7. Of the meanes to conserve, and augment in the Soule, the light of this true Wis∣dome.
CHAP. 8. Of other Vertues which cause a Politicke sufficiencie, and chiefly of Pru∣dence.
CHAP. 9. Of the Necessitie, Excellencie, and Offices of politicke Prudence.
CHAP. 10. That politicke Prudence is rare and how it is to be acquired.
CHAP. 11. That true Politicke Prudence ought to be deri∣ved from the Law of God, against Machiavilians.
CHAP. 12. How the Law of God is usefull for the acquisi∣tion of true Politicke Prudence.
THE SECOND BOOK. Of those vertues which doe forme honesty and integrity for the well imploy∣ing of sufficiencie.
CHAP. 1. Of Politicke Iustice in generall.
CHAP. 2. That an uniust action cannot be profitable to States, against Machiavill.
CHAP. 3. That Iniustice even against strangers cannot be profitable to States, contrary to the tenets of Machiavilians.
CHAP. 4. A digression from this discourse of iustice, to the title of Iust, wherein our King hol¦deth his name and raigne.
CHAP. 5. Adivision of Politicke iustice, into three mem∣bers and parts, what the Politicke oweth to God, what to himselfe, and what to the publike.
CHAP. 6. Of Religion and piety; being the first duty of Politicke Iustice, reflecting upon God.
CHAP. 7. Of the duties and particular fruits of Religion and politicke Piety.
CHAP. 8. Of the integrity of the Intention, which is the other duty of that Politicke Justice which reflecteth on God.
CHAP. 9. Of the care of a good renowne; being the first duty of Politicke Iustice towards our selves.
CHAP. 10. Of the obligation concerning a good reputation for profiting the publicke
CHAP. 11. Of the meanes to acquire, and conserve a good renowne.
CHAP. 12. Of the ordering of life and manners, which is the other head of Politicke Iustice towards himselfe.
CHAP. 13. Of good Example, which is the first duty of Politicke Iustice towards the Publicke.
CHAP. 14. Of vigilancy and solicitude, being the second duty of a Magistrates Iustice toward the publicke.
CHAP. 15. Of Integrity, which is the third duty of the Justice requisite in a Magistrate towards the publicke.
CHAP. 16. Of the mischiefes which the respect of private profit produceth.
CHAP. 17. Of love to publick good, being the last duty of Politick Iustice towards the publick.
CHAP. 18. The Epilogue of all this Discourse of Iustice, by way of Epiphonema.
THE THIRD BOOK. Of Vertues and Qualities which give vigour and grace to execute.
CHAP. 1. The proposition, and divisi of matters dis∣cused in this last Book.
CHAP. II. Of Authoritie.
CHAP. 3. Whence this Authoritie is derived.
CHAP. 4. The sequence of the same Discourse.
CHAP. 5. The sequence of the same Discourse, how wee ought rightly to employ those good parts wherewith we are endowed; thereby to gain Authority.
CHAP. 6. The sequence of the same Discourse.
CHAP. 7. Of good Luck.
CHAP. 8. That this good Fortune followes some, and how it is to be ma∣naged.
CHAP. 9. Of Fortitude and Courage.
CHAP. 10. Of the necessity of this fortitude in matter of execution.
CHAP. 11. That the effeminate and timorous, are not proper for any matter of a high nature.
CHAP. 12. What things are necessary to acquire and con∣serve the greatnesse of courage.
CHAP. 13. A pursuit of the same subiect.
CHAP. 14. Of Eloquence, being as the Ornament of Politicke vertues, giving vigor and gracefulnesse to make them estimable.
CHAP. 15. Of the Efficacy of Eloquence.
CHAP. 16. That Eloquence doth principally appeare, in popular States, but that it may be likewise very usefull in Mo∣narchicall Govern∣ments.
CHAP. 17. Of the Counterfait Eloquence of this Age.
CHAP. 18. Of the Eloquence proper for the Politician, and the Conclusion of this Worke.