For full access to this item, please  Login

Add to bookbag
Author: La Primaudaye, Pierre de, b. ca. 1545.
Title: The third volume of the French academie contayning a notable description of the whole world, and of all the principall parts and contents thereof: as namely, of angels both good and euill: of the celestiall spheres, their order and number: of the fixed stars and planets; their light, motion, and influence: of the fower elements, and all things in them, or of them consisting: and first of firie, airie, and watrie meteors or impressions of comets, thunders, lightnings, raines, snow, haile, rainebowes, windes, dewes, frosts, earthquakes, &c. ingendered aboue, in, and vnder the middle or cloudie region of the aire. And likewise of fowles, fishes, beasts, serpents, trees with their fruits and gum; shrubs, herbes, spices, drugs, minerals, precious stones, and other particulars most worthie of all men to be knowen and considered. Written in French by that famous and learned gentleman Peter de la Primaudaye Esquier, Lord of the same place, and of Barree: and Englished by R. Dolman.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

This keyboarded and encoded edition of the work described above is co-owned by the institutions providing financial support to the Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Searching, reading, printing, or downloading EEBO-TCP texts is reserved for the authorized users of these project partner institutions. Permission must be granted for subsequent distribution, in print or electronically, of this text, in whole or in part. Please contact project staff at eebotcp-info@umich.edu for further information or permissions.

Print source: The third volume of the French academie contayning a notable description of the whole world, and of all the principall parts and contents thereof: as namely, of angels both good and euill: of the celestiall spheres, their order and number: of the fixed stars and planets; their light, motion, and influence: of the fower elements, and all things in them, or of them consisting: and first of firie, airie, and watrie meteors or impressions of comets, thunders, lightnings, raines, snow, haile, rainebowes, windes, dewes, frosts, earthquakes, &c. ingendered aboue, in, and vnder the middle or cloudie region of the aire. And likewise of fowles, fishes, beasts, serpents, trees with their fruits and gum; shrubs, herbes, spices, drugs, minerals, precious stones, and other particulars most worthie of all men to be knowen and considered. Written in French by that famous and learned gentleman Peter de la Primaudaye Esquier, Lord of the same place, and of Barree: and Englished by R. Dolman.
La Primaudaye, Pierre de, b. ca. 1545., Dolman, R.

Londini: [Printed at Eliot's Court Press] impensis Geor. Bishop, 1601.
Alternate titles: Academie françoise. Part 3. English Academie françoise. Part 3.
Notes:
A translation of part 3 of: Academie françoise.
Identification of printer from STC.
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A05102.0001.001

Contents
title page
TO THE RIGHT WOR∣shipfull Sir WILLIAM MOVNSON Knight.
To the Reader.
Sonnet.
The speciall and principall matters handled in this third Tome of the French Academie, as it is diuided into seuerall daies works, and distinguished by Chapters.
THE FORESPEECH OF the Academicke speakers in the discourses following. Of Heauen and Earth.
THE FIRST DAIES WORKE, OF THE THIRD TOME OF THE FRENCH Academie. Of Heauen and Earth.
Of the creation of Heauen and Earth. Chapter 1.
Of Time, which tooke beginning with the World. Chapter 2.
Of the nullitie of reasons, framed concerning the nature of the world, against the creation thereof. Chap. 3.
Of the Reasons taken from motion, and the moouing In∣telligences, against the Genesis of the world, and of the nullitie of them. Chapter 4.
Of many other deuises, which they inuent, who pretend to ouerthrow the doctrine of the Creation of the world, performed by the Creator thereof. Chapter 5.
Concerning those causes which haue made the Philo∣phers to erre from the knowledge of truth, and of their ignorance concerning God, and his workes. Chapter 6.
Of the authoritie of such witnesses, as make the crea∣tion and newnes of the world vndoubted. Chapter 7.
Of the reasons making for the Creation and newnes of the world. Chapter 8.
THE SECOND DAIES WORKE.
Concerning the errors of these Philosophers, which say that God doth his outward worke of necessitie. Chapter 9.
Of the reasons which conclude, that God proceeded of free and franke deliberation to the worke of the world. Chap. 10.
Of one onely principall, and first cause of the Vniuers. Chapter 11.
Of the space of the sixe daies mentioned in the historie of the creation of the world. Chap. 12.
Of the mysteries hidden vnder the number of sixe in the creation of the vniuers: and of the seuenth day of rest. Chapter 13.
Of the diuision of the vniuersall world. Chap. 14.
Of the Angelicall, and intellectuall world. Chapter 15.
Of diuels and euill spirits. Chap. 16.
THE THIRD DAIES WORKE.
Of the celestiall or sphericall world. Chapter 17.
Of the forme and figure of heauen, and of the motion thereof as well generall as particular. Chap. 18.
Of the circles in generall, and particularly of the Equinoc∣tiall and Zodiack, and of their signes. Chapter 19.
Of the two great circles named Colures, and of the fower lesse circles and parallels, of the fiue Zones of the world and immooueable circles. Chap. 20.
Of the hower-circles, and what is done by them in sunne-dials: and of the circles, which diuide the twelue houses of heauen. Chap. 21.
Of the ascensions and descensions of the starres, and of the signes and other arcks of the Zodiack, and of the orientall and occidentall lati∣tude of the sunne, or degrees of the Zodiack. Chapter 22.
Of the naturall and artificiall daies, and of the nights, of their diuersitie and cause. Chap. 23.
Of equall and vnequall, temporall and artificiall howers of the heights of the sunne aboue the Horizon, and of his right and reuerse shadowes. Chapter 24.
THE FOVRTH DAIES WORKE.
Of the substance and nature of heauen, and of the celestiall bodies: and of their conti∣nuance and change. Chap. 25.
Of the motions ingenerall of their first cause, and of their vnion in all nature. Chapter 26.
Of the life, reason, and vnderstanding of the celestiall bodies: and of the excellent politicall and militarie order, which is amongst them. Chap. 27.
Of the influence and effects of the planets and starres in things here below, either to good or euill. Chapter 28.
Of the truth which is found in prognostications of Astrologers: and how the starres are appointed by God for signes, and that from their influences no euill proceedeth. Chapter 29.
Of the Planet Saturne, and how it is not euill, nor any other starre. Chapter 30.
Of the planets in generall, and how they worke in man, not in constraining, but disposing. Chap. 31.
Of the true Astronomie, which the heauens teach vs, and especially the sunne in his admirable effects. Chap. 32.
THE FIFT DAIES WORKE.
Of the rising and setting of the sunne: and of the proui∣dence of God, which shineth in the commo∣dities of day and night. Chapter 33.
Of the second course and motion of the Sunne and Moone, for the distinction of yeeres, moneths and sea∣sons: and of the prouidence of God in these things. Chap. 34.
Of the image of God, and of his light which is proposed to vs in the sunne: with the felicitie of mans life in the changing of light and of darknes. Chapter 35.
Of the eclipses of the sunne and moone; and of the image which we haue therein: of the constancie which is in God, and of the inconstancie of men, and of humane things. Chap. 36.
Of the beginning of naturall and corruptible things. Chapter 37.
Of the elements, and of things to be considered in them in that they are distinguished by the number of fower. Chap. 38.
Of the opinion of those who admit but three elements, not acknowledging the elementary fire. Chapter 39.
Of the perfect compositions which are in the nature of all things, by which the fower ele∣ments may be considered. Chap. 40.
THE SIXT DAIES WORKE.
Of the agreement betwixt the Elements and the Planets. Chap. 41.
Of the fire, and of the aire, and of the things engendred in them: and of their motions, and of the Windes. Chap. 42.
Of thunder and lightning. Chapter 43.
Of the true Meteors of Christians: and of the supernaturall causes of thunder and lightning. Chap. 44.
Of snowes, mists, frosts, ice, and haile. Chap. 45.
Of comets. Chap. 46.
Of cloudes and vapors. Chap. 47.
Of the waters sustayned and hanged in the aire, and of the raine-bowe. Chap. 48.
THE SEVENTH DAIES WORKE.
Of Dewes and Raine. Chapter 49.
Of the fertilitie caused by dewes and raine, and of the prouidence of God therein. Chap. 50.
Of the windes, and of their kindes and names: and of the testimonies which we haue in them of the power and maiestie of God. Chapter 51.
Of the foules of the aire: and namely of the Manuco∣diata, of the Eagle, of the Phenix, and of other wilde foule. Chap. 52.
Of singing birdes, and chiefly of the Nightingall, and of sundrie others, and of their witte and industrie. Chap. 53.
Of the Estridge, of the Peacocke, of the Cocke, and of other foules. Chap. 54.
Of the earth, and of the scituation, immobility, figure, and quality thereof. Chapter 55.
Of earth-quakes. Chap. 56.
THE EIGHT DAIES WORKE.
Of the sea, and of the waters, and of the diuision and distribution of them through∣out the earth. Chap. 57.
Of the flowing and ebbing of the sea; and of the power that the moone hath ouer it and ouer all other inferior bodies. Chap. 58.
Of salt, fresh, and warme waters; and of other diuersities in them. Chapter 59.
Of the commodities which men reape of the waters, by nauigation, and of the directions which sea-men receiue from heauen, and from the starres vpon the sea. Chap. 60.
Of the diuision of lands and countries amongst men by the waters; and of the limits which are ap∣pointed them for the bounds of their habitations. Chap. 61.
Of the commodities which are incident to men, and to all creatures, by the course of the waters through the earth. Chap. 62.
Of diuers kindes of fishes: namely of the whale, of the dolphin, of the sea-calfe, and others. Chapter 63.
Of the image that we haue of the state of this world, and of men, in the sea and in the fishes thereof. Chap. 64.
THE NINTH DAIES WORKE.
Of fruits, and of the fertilitie of the earth, and the causes thereof: and of herbs, trees and plants. Chap. 65.
Of the vertue that herbes, and other fruits of the earth haue in phisicke and in food; and of the true vse of them. Chap. 66.
Of the diuersitie of plants, and of their difference and na∣turall growth; and of their parts, and of the most excellent amongst them. Chapter 67.
Of trees, and especially of the Pine, the Fir-tree, the Cypresse-tree, and the Cedar. Chap. 68.
Of trees bearing Cinamon, Cassia, Frankin∣cense, Myrrhe and Cloues. Chap. 69.
Of trees and plants that beare Nutmegs, Ginger, and Pepper. Chap. 70.
Of the Date-tree, of the Baratha or tree of India, of the Gehuph and of Brasill. Chap. 71.
Of the Citron-tree, Limon-tree, Orange-tree, Oliue-tree, and Pomegranate-tree. Chap. 72.
THE TENTH DAIES WORKE.
Of Mallowes, Wilde Mallowes, Purple Violets, Betonie, Ceterach, and Saint Iohns-Worte. Chapter 73.
Of Celondine, Cammocke, Wormewood, Hyssope, Sage, and Mints. Chap. 74.
Of Thyme, Sauorie, Marierom, Rue, Par∣sley, and Fennell. Chap. 75.
Of Rosemarie, Cammomill, the Lillie, Baulme, of grasse or dogs-tooth, and of Pimpernell. Chap. 76.
Of Night-shade, Alkakeng, Pellitorie of the wall, Fumi∣torie, Angelica, and of Maidens-haire. Chapter 77.
Of Rheubarb, Licorice, Aloes, Sene, Saffron and Centurie. Chapter 78.
Of Wheate, Rie, Barley, and Oates; and of Rice, and Millet. Chap. 79.
Of the Vine, of Grapes, of Wine, and of Aqua-vitae. Chap. 80.
THE ELEVENTH DAIES WORKE.
Of terrestriall beasts, and especially of Serpents: namely of the Aspis or Adder, and of the Viper. Chapter 81.
Of Bees, and of their honie and waxe, and of Silke-wormes. Chap. 82.
Of the Dog, and of the Horse. Chapter 83.
Of the Elephant, of the Camell, and of the Rhinoceros. Chap. 84.
Of the Lion, of the Tigre and of the Panther. Chapter 85.
Of the Woolfe, of the Beare, and of the Ape. Chapter 86.
Of the Hart, of the Bore, and of the Vnicorne. Chapter 87.
Of the Hiena or Ciuet-cat, of the Muske-cat, of the Beuer, and of the Otter. Chap. 88.
Of the right vse of venemous creatures, and wilde beasts; and of the iustice and bountie of God which shineth in them. Chapter 89.
Of the nourishment of many animals, by that which is ve∣nim and poyson to others; and of the natu∣rall amitie and enimitie which is amongst them. Chap. 90.
Of the vtility that commeth vnto men by beasts, and chiefly by priuate and domesticall-tame beasts, and of the woon∣derfull prouidence of God, which decla∣reth it selfe in them. Chap. 91.
Of the blessing and prouidence of God, in the multiplication and conseruation of those beasts, that are most pro∣fitable to men, and by whom they re∣ceiue most commodities. Chapter 92.
THE TWELFTH DAIES WORKE.
Of mettals and especially of Gold. Chapter 93.
Of Siluer, Amber, Iron, Lead, Brasse and Copper. Chap. 94.
Of precious stones, and chiefely of the Diamond. Chap. 95.
Of the Emeraud, of the Carbuncle or Rubie, of the Sa∣phir, of the Iacinth, and of the Amethyst. Chapter 96.
Of the Chrysolite, Topaze, Opall, Turkesse, and of the Agath. Chap. 97.
Of Pearle, Corall, and Chrystall. Chapter 98.
Of the instructions that men must take, in that gold and siluer are hidden vnder the ground, and of their vse and abuse, as also of precious stones. Chapter 99.
Of the doctrine and profit which euerie one must and may reape out of the totall workes of God in hea∣uen and in earth, to acknowledge and glorifie him. Chap. 100.