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Author: Jewell, William, b. 1585 or 6.
Title: The golden cabinet of true treasure: containing the summe of morall philosophie. Translated out of French & enlarged, by W. Ievvel, Mr of Arts, of Exeter Colledge in Oxford.
Publication Info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: The golden cabinet of true treasure: containing the summe of morall philosophie. Translated out of French & enlarged, by W. Ievvel, Mr of Arts, of Exeter Colledge in Oxford.
Jewell, William, b. 1585 or 6.

At London: Printed by H. L[ownes] for Iohn Crosley, 1612.
Notes:
Printer's name from STC.
Dedication signed: William Iewell.
Reproduction of the original in the British Library.
Subject terms:
Conduct of life -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A04486.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Right Hono∣rable and most vertuous Lady, the worthy Patronesse of Learning, ALICE, Coun∣tesse of Darby, &c.
The Epistle to the Reader.
table of contents
errata
In Zoilum.
The Golden Cabinet of true Trea∣sure.
The description of Vertue: and of her property in man.
The Diuision of Ver∣tue into her foure princi∣all parts: from the which, as from their sourse, all other subal∣ternate vertues spring.
Of such things as are re∣quisite in the acquist of vertue, and which concurre to the perfect accom∣plishment of a vertuous man.
The first effect that ver∣tue produceth in man: which is, th knowledge of himselfe; whereby he may be hm∣bled.
The second effect that ver∣tue produceth in man: which is, the knowledge of vice, and of the euils which proceed from it.
The third effect that Ʋer∣tue produceth in Man: which is, both the theory and practice of con∣quering him∣selfe.
The fourth effect that Vertue produceth in Man: which teacheth him to performe his duetie towards all men, demeaning him∣selfe worthily in his Vocation.
The Description of true Honour: and how it ought to bee acqui∣red.
The description of false Honour; the true subiect and ground of Quarrels and Contentions.
The pretended ground of Quar∣rels is, false Honour: which causeth a man to be the Author of his owne destruction.
The Description of Choler; of the euils which pro∣ceede from it, of the causes which produce it, of the meanes of corre∣cting it; and consequently of auoyding contentions and debates.
The description of true rest, and perfect pleasure, wherwith Vertue accompa∣nieth Honour; accomplish∣ing man, with all felicitie.