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Author: Isocrates.
Title: A perfite looking glasse for all estates most excellently and eloquently set forth by the famous and learned oratour Isocrates, as contained in three orations of morall instructions, written by the authour himselfe at the first in the Greeke tongue, of late yeeres translated into Lataine by that learned clearke Hieronimus Wolfius. And nowe Englished to the behalfe of the reader, with sundrie examples and pithy sentences both of princes and philosophers gathered and collected out of diuers writers, coted in the margent approbating the authors intent, no lesse delectable then profitable.
Publication info: Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan, Digital Library Production Service
2011 April (TCP phase 2)
Availability:

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Print source: A perfite looking glasse for all estates most excellently and eloquently set forth by the famous and learned oratour Isocrates, as contained in three orations of morall instructions, written by the authour himselfe at the first in the Greeke tongue, of late yeeres translated into Lataine by that learned clearke Hieronimus Wolfius. And nowe Englished to the behalfe of the reader, with sundrie examples and pithy sentences both of princes and philosophers gathered and collected out of diuers writers, coted in the margent approbating the authors intent, no lesse delectable then profitable.
Isocrates., Isocrates., Isocrates.

Imprinted at London: By Thomas Purfoote, dwelling in Newgate Market, within the new rents, at the signe of the Lucrece, 1580.
Alternate titles: To Demonicus. English To Demonicus.
Notes:
Translator's dedication signed: Thomas Forrest.
The orations are "To Demonicus", "To Nicocles", and "Nicocles".
Reproduction of the original in the Henry E. Huntington Library and Art Gallery.
Subject terms:
Conduct of life -- Early works to 1900.
Kings and rulers -- Duties -- Early works to 1800.
URL: http://name.umdl.umich.edu/A04136.0001.001

Contents
title page
To the Right Honorable, and his sin∣guler good Lord, Sir Thomas Bromley Knight, Lord Chaunceller of England, and one of the Queenes Maiesties most honorable Priuie Counsell.
The Epistle of the Translatour to the Reader.
The Authours Enchomion vpon the Right Honorable and his singuler good Lord, sir Thomas Bromley, the Lord Chauncelour of England.
J. D. in commendation of the Author.
Jn praise of the Author.
The Booke to the Reader.
The firste Oration of Morall in∣structions, written by the famous and learned O∣rator Jsocrates, vnto his friend Demonicus: contayning a perfite description of the duetye of euery pri∣uate person.
The Preface of the Translator vnto the second Oration of Morall instructions, written by that famous and learned Oratour Isocrates vnto Ni∣cocles the king of Salamis, as touching the due∣tie of Princes and Magistrates, and the well ordering of a Com∣mon Weale.
The second Oration of Morall in∣structions as touching the dutie of Princes and Magi∣strates and the well gouerning of a common weale, written by that noble and famous Oratour Isocrates, vnto Nicocles the King of Salamis.
The preface of the Translatour vnto the third Oration of Morall instructions, written by that famous and learned Oratour Isocrates, con∣taining the discourse made by Nicocles king of Salamis vnto his people, and there∣fore termed by the Authour Nicocles.
The third Oration of Morall in∣structions, written by that famous and learned O∣ratour Isocrates, containing the discourse made by Nicocles King of Salamis, vnto his people, and therefore termed by the Authour Nicocles.
colophon