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Title: Force, Resultant
Original Title: Force résultante
Volume and Page: Vol. 7 (1757), p. 120
Author: Jean Le Rond d'Alembert
Translator: John S.D. Glaus [The Euler Society, restinn@roadrunner.com]
Original Version (ARTFL): Link
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URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.756
Citation (MLA): d'Alembert, Jean Le Rond. "Force, Resultant." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by John S.D. Glaus. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2007. Web. [fill in today's date in the form 18 Apr. 2009 and remove square brackets]. <http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.756>. Trans. of "Force résultante," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, vol. 7. Paris, 1757.
Citation (Chicago): d'Alembert, Jean Le Rond. "Force, Resultant." The Encyclopedia of Diderot & d'Alembert Collaborative Translation Project. Translated by John S.D. Glaus. Ann Arbor: Michigan Publishing, University of Michigan Library, 2007. http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.did2222.0000.756 (accessed [fill in today's date in the form April 18, 2009 and remove square brackets]). Originally published as "Force résultante," Encyclopédie ou Dictionnaire raisonné des sciences, des arts et des métiers, 7:120 (Paris, 1757).

Resulting force is the definition that has been given by various authors to uniform force which results from the action of various others. This resultant force is found by the principle of the diagonal across the parallelogram.

See Composition. When two or more forces are parallel one is to suppose that their directions are extended to infinity and by this method one always finds the resulting force since two parallels are supposed to lead to infinity. See Parallel.