Boston Evening Post letters  1769-1778
full text File Size: 8 K bytes | Add this to my bookbag

Collection Scope and Content Note

This collection consists of 8 letters written to John and Thomas Fleet, editors of the Boston Evening Post, during the pre-Revolutionary period.

The collection contains the following letters, addressed to the newspaper's editors:

  • [Joseph Warren?], attacking John Mein, publisher of the Boston Chronicle, for criticizing the Boston non-importation agreement (published September 4, 1769)
  • [Joseph Warren?], describing the murder of 13-year-old Christopher Snider following a riot related to the Boston non-importation agreement (published February 26, 1770)
  • Joseph Allen, describing a violent dispute over the ownership of a farm in Greenwich, Massachusetts, and including a related resolution from several nearby towns' Committees of Correspondence (November 10, 1774; published December 19, 1774)
  • [John Fuller?], favorably reporting that "Doctor John Taylor of Lunenburg, in Order for the Promotion of Military Knowledge , which in these Times of Public Calamity, seems Indispensably necessary, generally gave to the Minute Company of that Town, 55 Military Books" (December 8, 1774)
  • Anonymous, reporting that Thomas Weeks, Deputy Sheriff of Greenwich, Massachusetts, resigned and burned his commission as a protest against "Unconstitutional Government," including a list of 8 celebratory toasts (December 19, 1774; published January 16, 1775)
  • Ephraim Whitney, recanting a statement published on October 17, 1774, in which he claimed to support the British government, and claiming the earlier statement was made under coercion [1774]
  • Solomon Stoddard, affirming his intentions to submit to the actions of the Continental Congress and to have no correspondence with General Thomas Gage, possibly made under coercion (February 3, 1775)
  • "A Real Friend to Government," quoting several laws related to punishments for British military officers who participate in riots and calling for a trial of related parties; possibly in response to the Boston Massacre (undated)
Show all series level scope and content notes