Manuscripts Division
William L. Clements Library
University of Michigan

Finding aid for
Henry Glen Papers, 1781-1801

Finding aid created by
B. K., September 1992

Summary Information
Title: Henry Glen papers
Creator: Glen, Henry, 1739-1814
Inclusive dates: 1781-1801
Extent: 15 items
Abstract:
The Glen papers consists of fifteen letters written to Henry Glen over a period of twenty years by family members and business acquaintances while Glen served as a member of the first three Provincial Congresses, as a member of the Committee of Safety, and as the deputy quartermaster general.
Language: The material is in English
Repository: William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan

Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

1991. M-2657

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open to research.

Copyright:

No copyright restrictions.

Preferred Citation:

Henry Glen Papers, William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan


Biography

Henry Glen was baptized July 13, 1739 in Schenectady, N.Y. He had one brother, John. The brothers formed a trading company with Jacobus Teller, which they ran for some time before the American Revolution. At the age of 28, Mr. Glen began his political career with an appointment as clerk of Schenectady county, a position in which he served until 1809.

During the Revolution, Mr. Glen was active on the side of the colonists, serving as a member of the first three Provincial Congresses and as a member of the Committee of Safety. He was a captain in the second company of militia for Schenectady County, although he did not serve in that capacity. Mr. Glen's chief position during the War for Independence was deputy quartermaster general. As such, he was in charge of all stores for Schenectady, and communicated with a number of important persons within the young nation, including Governor George Clinton of New York and General George Washington.

After the war, Mr. Glen continued to pursue an active role in state politics, first as a state assembly member (1786-1787, 1810) and later as a representative in the U.S. Congress (1793-1801). While he had no official political party membership, Mr. Glen sided with the Federalists when the Republicans began to grow in strength. Although Mr. Glen's official position of deputy quartermaster general was a wartime appointment, he remained involved with the movements of supplies to troops in New York state throughout his time in Congress.

Much less is known of Henry Glen's personal life. At some point before or during the Revolution, he married. Two children were born of the marriage, John Visscher and Catherine. Mr. Glen was also related to Andrew Cornelius Cuyler, the former royal mayor of Albany, who married Jane Elizabeth (Janetie) Glen, possibly Henry's sister.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The Henry Glen collection consists of fifteen letters written to Mr. Glen over a period of twenty years by family members and business acquaintances. All but one of the letters was written while Glen was a representative in Congress. Nine of the letters date between February 1795 and February 1796.

The subject matter varies considerably. Two themes, corresponding to the two areas where letters are focused, dominate the letters. Five items, dated March 1795 through September 1795, follow the Jay Treaty from its arrival in Philadelphia through ratification and the ensuing political turmoil. Three letters, dated October 1797 through August 1799, discuss the difficulties involved with supplying troops in northwestern New York.

Three individual letters are interesting for their observations on local politics. Leonard Bronck's, a first term New York State Senator wrote to Mr. Glen in February 1796, describing the activities of the state senate. Joseph Hopkinson's letter (1801 February 15), is the reply to an earlier Glen letter (missing). Hopkinson's letter describes the responses within Philadelphia to Congressional debates over who should be the next president. Mr. Glen's earlier letter was the basis for Philadelphia's knowledge of the Congressional debates at that time. Finally, one letter from Glen's son, John Visscher, (1795 September 5) touches tangentially upon the Jay Treaty, but also provides a description of the political turmoil and suspicions in Philadelphia at the time.

Subject Terms

    Subjects:
    • Great Britain.--Treaties, etc.--United States, 1794 Nov. 19.
    • Jay, John, 1745-1829.
    • Loans, Personal.
    • United States. Army.
    • United States--History.
    • United States--Politics and government.
    Contents List
    Container / Location Title
    Box   2, Small Collections  
    Henry Glen papers,  1781 October 26-1801 February 15 [series]
    Additional Descriptive Data
    Partial Subject Index
    Burr, Aaron, 1756-1836
    • 1801 February 15
    Collecting of accounts
    • 1799 August 20
    Davis, John, 1761-1847
    • 1795 September 5
    Entertaining
    • 1795 February 18
    Epidemics
    • 1795 September 5
    France--History--Revolution, 1789-1799
    • 1795 April 1
    Gansevoort, Peter, 1749-1812
    • 1781 October 26
    Glen, Jacob
    • 1800 February 22
    Hamilton, Alexander, 1757-1804
    • 1795 July 7
    Horses
    • 1795 July 7
    Jay, John, 1745-1829
    • 1795 April 1
    • 1795 June 10
    • 1795 June 29
    • 1795 July 7
    Jay's treaty, 1794
    • 1795 April 1
    • 1795 June 10
    • 1795 June 29
    • 1795 July 7
    Jefferson, Thomas, 1743-1826
    • 1801 February 15
    Loans, Personal
    • 1795 March 18
    • 1795 September 5
    • 1796 January 4
    New York (State)--Politics and government--1775-1865
    • 1796 February 8
    New York (State)--Social life and customs--1783-1865
    • 1795 February 18
    Payment
    • 1797 October 4
    • 1799 August 20
    Pickering, Timothy, 1745-1829
    • 1795 September 5
    Presidents--United States--Election--1800
    • 1801 February 15
    Stark, John, 1728-1822
    • 1781 October 26
    United Empire loyalists
    • 1800 February 22
    United States. Army--Procurement
    • 1798 March 3
    United States. Army--Recruiting, enlistment, etc.
    • 1795 June 10
    • 1795 June 29
    United States. Army--Supplies and stores
    • 1797 October 4
    • 1798 March 3
    United States. Congress. Senate
    • 1795 April 1
    United States--Constitution--Amendments
    • 1796 February 8
    United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--American Forces
    • 1781 October 26
    United States--History--Revolution, 1775-1783--Claims vs. United States
    • 1800 February 22
    United States--History--War with France, 1798-1800
    • 1798 March 3
    United States--Politics and government, 1789-1797
    • 1795 September 5
    United States--Politics and government--1783-1809
    • 1801 February 15
    Willett, Marinus, 1744-1826
    • 1781 October 26
    Wolcott, Oliver, 1760-1833
    • 1795 June 10
    Yellow fever
    • 1795 September 5