Manuscripts Division
William L. Clements Library
University of Michigan

Finding aid for
Richard Cary Morse Papers, 1852-1886

Finding aid created by
Susan M. Swasta, June 1994

Summary Information
Title: Richard Cary Morse papers
Creator: Morse, Richard Cary, 1841-1926
Inclusive dates: 1852-1886
Bulk dates: 1853-1863
Extent: 3.5 linear feet
Abstract:
The Morse papers consists of letters from various members of the well known Morse Family of New England, with the greatest part of the correspondence between Richard Morse, Sr. and his son Richard Morse, Jr. including many letters written while Richard junior was at school.
Language: The material is in English
Repository: William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan
909 S. University Ave.
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190
Phone: 734-764-2347
Web Site: www.clements.umich.edu


Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

1990. M-2531.

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research.

Copyright:

Copyright status is unknown.

Preferred Citation:

Richard Cary Morse papers, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan


Biography

Richard Cary Morse was born into a religiously and socially conservative New England family well known for its intellectual contributions to American life. His grandfather, Jedediah Morse (1761-1826), was the first of many Morse men to attend Yale, helped to found Andover Theological Seminary, and authored the earliest American geography. He was a staunchly orthodox Congregational minister, ardent Federalist, and active evangelist, and advanced his views by writing and editing conservative religious and political periodicals and helping to establish the American Tract Society and American Bible Society.

Jedediah Morse's three sons, Samuel Finley Breese, Sidney Edwards, and Richard Cary, followed their father's lead, but emphasized different aspects of the Morse intellectual and religious tradition in their individual careers. With his work in telegraphy and photography and his career as a painter and advocate of the arts, Samuel F.B. Morse pioneered in both the scientific and artistic fields. He perpetuated the family's aggressively conservative political and religious tradition with his involvement in anti-Catholic and nativist movements. Samuel Morse's eminent career overshadows the achievements of his two brothers, though each was successful in his own right. Sidney Edwards Morse was also an accomplished scientist and inventor, collaborating with Samuel on a pump design, working with Henry Munson in the development of a color printing process, and inventing the bathometer for sea exploration. He continued Jedediah Morse's geographical work and, at his father's suggestion, furthered the cause of conservative Protestantism by establishing religious newspapers in Boston and New York.

Third brother Richard pursued no scientific endeavors. After attending Yale and the Andover Theological Seminary he was ordained as a Presbyterian minister, but occupied the pulpit for only a few years before joining his father to help with geographical texts. In 1823 he moved to New York to join brother Sidney in founding the New York Observer, where he specialized in editing, writing, and translating French and German contributions. Richard Morse's more modest career may be explained in part by the early death of his wife, the former Sarah Louisa Davis, and the responsibility of raising nine children. He remarried in 1856, but one senses from family correspondence that his second wife, Harriott Messinger Morse, did not take a central role in child-raising. Morse was a nervous, worry-driven man, and suffered from depression and stomach ailments all his adult life. His symptoms were eased by ocean travel, so he made frequent business and pleasure trips to Europe and occasionally took voyages solely for health reasons. Regret that he had been unable to pursue a career of theological scholarship seems to have been a central factor in his unhappiness. In his later years, after retiring from the Observer, Morse concentrated on a biography of his father, working in conjunction with William Buell Sprague, the noted biographer of American clergymen. Unable to resolve questions over interpretation of incidents in his father's life, Morse never brought the project to completion.

Richard Cary Morse, the second, appears to have been marked early on as the scholar of the family. He started school at age four and was sent to a boarding school in New Jersey at six. The boy's precocious intellectual bent was encouraged by Morse senior, who took his son to France with him on Observer business in 1851, the year after Mrs. Morse's death. Here they stayed with religious historian Guy de Felice, a regular contributor to the newspaper and co-author with Morse of publications on French literary and religious history, and young Richard studied the French language. Taking note of the difficulties brother Sidney had had at Yale after a public school education, Richard persuaded his father to send him to Andover Academy in 1853. He remained one term, then joined three sisters and a brother at boarding school in Connecticut for two years while Morse senior was abroad on business. Returning to Andover, he graduated in 1858, then entered Yale. Young Morse was a strong student and an avid participant in debate and athletics at Andover and Yale, and at both schools formed a strong, close circle of friends.

Religious activities were also a central part of Morse's school years, for his father insisted on regular church attendance and encouraged religious reading. He also expected his son to choose his friends carefully and to seek the company and advice of good Christians. As an adult Morse wrote that he had wanted to become a minister since childhood (a desire no doubt fostered by awareness that this would please his father), but that "my Christian life for some years was not a very happy one." The boy lacked faith in his vocation and felt ill-equipped in the writing and speaking skills he deemed necessary for a minister. At Yale he actively set out to address these weaknesses, engaging in debate and oratory, taking part in prayer meetings and Sunday School teaching. Once Richard had decided upon a religious calling, it became a settled matter in the eyes of his father and stepmother. When the Civil War began, the young man's religious convictions took a back seat to patriotic fervor, and he ardently desired to join Yale classmates who were enlisting. His parents firmly forbade it, insisting that he was meant for a higher purpose, and eventually, after heated interchanges, their views prevailed. The angry tenor of the correspondence indicates that relations between the two Richards became strained, and were perhaps permanently altered. In his autobiography Morse terms the decision "one of the most serious disappointments of my life," although he maintains that he eventually came to see it as "providential." The published version of Morse's life smoothes over stresses and strains expressed more openly in his letters, so an admission of disappointment in print indicates that it must have been a heavy blow indeed.

After graduating from Yale in 1862 Richard joined his father (with some reluctance, based on the evidence of correspondence) for a year of research on a Jedediah Morse biography which was to be written by William Buell Sprague. He then spent two years in Auburn, New York as private tutor for the family of Throop Martin, followed by two years of study at the Princeton and Union theological seminaries. He received degrees from both institutions in 1867. Meanwhile, ownership of the New York Observer had passed from the elder Morse brothers to Richard Cary Morse's son, the second Sidney Edwards Morse, and to Samuel Iranaeus Prine. Richard was offered an assistant editorship, and decided that religious journalism would serve as a fit beginning for his ministerial career. In October, 1867, Morse was sent to cover a YMCA convention for the Observer, and was much impressed by the "evangelistic enthusiasm" of the speakers, especially Dwight Moody. Soon afterward he joined the association, and in 1869 was asked to take a new position as YMCA secretary and editor, taking charge of a quarterly magazine. This began a 47-year career which culminated in the position of national YMCA general secretary. In this capacity Morse traveled the world to help extend YMCA influence and prepared works on the organization's history. Though ordained in 1869, Richard Morse never served as a minister. The YMCA was to be his calling and the central activity of his life. He married Jane Elizabeth Van Cott at 42, had no children, and died in Brooklyn, New York in 1926.

Probably in response to the early death of their mother, the Morse children -- Elizabeth, Charlotte, Louisa, Sidney, Mary, Richard, Rebecca, William, and Oliver -- became a close-knit brood, and the eldest took it upon themselves to act as guardians and advisers for younger siblings. Elizabeth Morse Colgate, the oldest, was especially influential; her brother lovingly refers to her as our "mother-sister" in his autobiography, and notes that for 42 years "her home was the home of all of us." This was the case despite their father's remarriage (which is not even mentioned in Morse junior's autobiography), for relations between children and stepmother appear to have been less than fond, in turn affecting the ties between the younger Morses and their father. Being sent away to boarding school probably also strengthened sibling ties. The elder Morse believed that New York City, though he was bound to live there for business reasons, was an unhealthy place for children, and that they could attain a superior education only in private schools. (He reneged somewhat on this practice with the two youngest boys, pulling them out of boarding school in favor of public school in New York; poor financial conditions probably had as much to do with this decision as educational concerns.) They attended a school in Hartford, Connecticut run by Miss E.D. Apthorp, a sister-in-law of Horace Bushnell. This was evidently a progressive educational institution, for its curriculum combined elements of an English and a classical education along with an emphasis on the practical and the healthful, such as gardening and working with tools. The Morse girls' education seems to have ended after graduation from Miss Apthorp's school in the early teens, while the boys, following family tradition, went on to Andover Academy for a full college preparatory education, and then to Yale. The political liberalism of these New England institutions concerned, and often downright irritated, the conservative elder Morse -- he was later to express regret that he had sent his children away to be educated in a way which would lead to disrespect for him. Son Richard, however, appears to have passed through his rebellious stage and settled back into the essential Morse respectability and conservatism.


Collection Scope and Content Note

About half of the correspondence in the Morse papers consists of letters between father and son, written mainly while Richard junior was at Andover and Yale. The senior Morse insisted that the boy write often and at length as a way of maintaining a close relationship with his family, describing academic and recreational activities, expressing his opinions on all sorts of matters, recording the substance of sermons and lectures he attended. His own letters to his son were similarly detailed. The correspondence is a particularly rich source of data on the content and tenor of conservative Protestant preaching during this era, as well as on details of a classical private education. Perhaps its greatest value, however, is as a record of the father-son relationship and the changes it went through as Richard junior matured. It shows how the young man gradually took on his own opinions and tastes, and became less shy about expressing them even when they brought him into disagreement with his father -- who was clearly a strongly opinionated and very controlling parent. (He advises his son minutely on food, exercise, study, religious practice, dress, companionship, sleep habits, reading, career choice, etc.) Richard's New England experience brought him into contact with liberal political and social views which were much at odds with Morse conservatism, and while he never strayed very far from the fold, his conservatism became more tempered than his father's, his perspective broader and outlook more flexible. The letters record the process of this separation and personal development.

The 100-odd letters to and from siblings are briefer, less revealing, though far from rote and mechanical. They depict warm affection between brothers and sisters and the protective, advising role taken on by elder toward younger. Those from older sisters at home show the busy doings of the New York household and the many comings and goings of various family members, for the Morses were great travelers, both in America and abroad. Eldest sister Elizabeth Morse Colgate wrote especially detailed and loving letters, advising Richard on matters of clothing, manners, and general behavior and catching him up on family activities. Brother Sidney offered his opinions on conduct appropriate to young men, and especially advised Richard on matters of academics and personal finances. Older sister Charlotte seems to have styled herself as a religious guide for her younger brother, while Mary and Louisa occupy a less prominent role with regard to Richard, at least as expressed in surviving family correspondence. Richard, in turn, looked out for those who came after him, and his younger sister Rebecca and brothers Willie and Nollie sought his advice on all kinds of matters, from politics to reading choices to composition themes.

Harriott Messinger Morse does not seem to have developed a close relationship with stepson Richard, and this eventually led to strained feelings between father and son, for he blamed Richard for the failure. A few later letters between siblings indicate that the other Morse children had their problems with her as well, and the father seems to have responded with some bitterness toward his children and the sad results of their "liberal" education. In Richard's case, particularly, there may have been some truth in this, for the boy developed a close relationship with Miss E.D. Apthorp, a fervent abolitionist, during his education at her Hartford school which continued into his college years. The Morse papers contain 7 letters to Richard from Apthorp, only 4 from his stepmother--and the Apthorp letters are far warmer, more personal and engaging. Richard's former teacher encouraged him in his efforts to enter the Civil War service, in open opposition to his parents' wishes.

Relations between the Richard Cary Morse household and the families of Samuel F.B. and Sidney Morse are touched upon but not detailed in the collection. There was evidently frequent communication and visiting back and forth, especially among the young women, and the two younger brothers and their families shared the same New York City house for some years. A few letters mention "Uncle Finley's" (Samuel F.B. Morse) travels, activities, and honors, but there is no direct correspondence with him or his family in these papers.

Richard's letters from friends during and just after college make up a valuable component of this collection. They depict the nature of male friendship, and the sorts of interests, concerns and activities typical of young men of this social class during the era. They are open with one another about loneliness, religious doubts, and other personal matters. Since the Civil War erupted during Morse's college years, young men faced difficult decisions and pressures which led them into vastly different experiences. Richard felt guilty about avoiding war duty, and conscientiously tried to keep in touch with those who went into the army. Other friends also opted out of service, expressing varying degrees of remorse over their decisions. There are a few letters from former classmates in military camp, and others which tell of friends in the service, several of whom died.

There are several small subsets of correspondence pertaining to non-family matters. Seven letters between Richard Morse senior and Guillaume de Felice offer a few details about social and religious conditions in France, the publishing business, and the conservative religious tone of the New York Observer, which regularly published pieces by Felice. A series of letters between clergyman, religious writer, and autograph collector William Buell Sprague (1795-1876) and the two Morse brothers involved in the Observer records the difficult relations which developed between Sprague and the Morses during his work on a biography of Jedediah Morse. One controversy touched upon in a few 1858 letters is the accusation by the Morses that Sprague, without their permission, removed autographs from letters given to him in relation to the biographical work. He vigorously denied this, and the truth of the matter is not evident from the correspondence. A more complicated and extended dispute, in 1867, revolved around the treatment by Sprague in the biography of a scandal in Jedediah Morse's career involving accusations of plagiarism of work by Hannah Adams. Adams was a Unitarian, Morse a well-known and fervent anti-Unitarian, and his condemnation, some felt, was more related to his religious views and former attacks on Unitarianism than the actual merits of Adams' case. Sprague wished to avoid reopening the issue, Sidney Morse felt strongly that his father should be vindicated in the biography, and Richard senior wavered back and forth indecisively, increasing Sprague's discomfort level. The arguing and negotiating goes on at great length, and evidently to no end, for the project was abandoned after being all but ready for press.

The Morses, with their impressive intellectual tradition and high level of education and sophistication, could hardly be considered a typical family of the time, particularly since their religious orientation, anti-urban sentiments, and lack of wealth kept them somewhat isolated from the general upper-class New York scene. This very difference contributes interest to the collection, for Richard Morse was not a typical wealthy young Yale man on his way to an illustrious career. He struggled with strongly conservative family traditions and parental opinions that were often at odds with what he encountered in his own experience, and which he wished at times to defy. In the end, Richard Cary Morse was decidedly a Morse, abandoning youthful doubts and contrary ambitions for a life of religious service, but in a form which reflected the strong influence of his school and college years -- by devoting himself to an organization formed to encourage the fellowship of Christian young men.

Subject Terms

    Subjects:
    • Abolitionists.
    • Andover Academy.
    • Boarding schools--Connecticut.
    • College students--Conduct of life.
    • Sermons.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • Yale University.
    • Young Men's Christian Association.
    Contents List
       Container / Location    Title
     
    Richard Cary Morse papers [series]:
    Box   1  
     1852-1855 [subseries]:
    Box   2  
     1856 [subseries]:
    Box   3  
     1857 [subseries]:
    Box   4  
     1858-1859 [subseries]:
    Box   5  
      June 1860-May 9, 1862 [subseries]:
    Box   6  
      May 14, 1862-April 11, 1863 [subseries]:
    Box   7  
      July 7, 1864-May 22, 1886 [subseries]:
    Additional Descriptive Data
    Related Materials

    A collection of Morse family papers owned by Sterling Memorial Library of Yale University contains a miscellany of family materials, mostly by or relating to Jedediah Morse. A box of letters from Richard Cary Morse senior to family members is included, as well as some letters of Sarah Davis Morse, and a manuscript copy of the Jedediah Morse biography by the two Richard Morses.

    Bibliography

    Morse, Richard Cary. My Life With Young Men. Fifty Years in the Young Men's Christian Association. New York, N.Y. : Association Press, 1918. (All quotes are from this source.)

    Morse, Richard Cary. Fifty Years of Federation of the Young Men's Christian Associations of North America. New York, N.Y.: YMCA, 1905.

    Partial Subject Index
    Abolitionists.
    • 1856 January 30
    • 1856 May 6
    • 1856 June 14
    • 1856 November 7
    • 1858 February 24
    • 1858 May 10
    • 1862 August 9, 13, 14
    Academic achievement.
    • 1855 November 21
    • 1856 March 13
    • 1856 May 1, 16, 17, 20, 31
    • 1856 July 3
    • 1856 October 4 , 8, 30
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1857 January 10
    • 1857 February 21
    • 1858 May 25
    • 1861 January 13
    • 1862 October 1
    Accidents--Fireworks.
    • 1857 July 11
    Adams, Hannah, 1755-1831.
    • 1867 March 28, 30
    • 1867 April 1, 2
    • 1867 May 15, 21, 23, 27
    • 1867 June 28
    • 1867 July 2, 8, 10, 16, 24, 26, 29
    • 1867 August 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 20
    • 1867 September 3, 6, 7, 10
    • 1867 November 15
    • ca. 1867 May 21
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4
    • 1870 September 5
    Adams, William, 1807-1880.
    • 1856 April 14, 27
    • 1856 May 6
    • 1856 September 17, 25
    • 1856 October 3, 19
    • 1857 February 11
    • 1857 October 31
    • 1858 March 11
    • 1858 October 13, 25
    • 1858 November 20
    African-Americans.
    • 1856 January 30
    Agassiz, Jean Louis Rodolphe, 1807-1873.
    • 1859 May 9
    Alcott, William Andrus, 1798-1859.
    • 1857 January 17, 23, 24
    Alden, Joseph, 1807-1885.
    • 1853 April 23
    Altoona (Pa.)--Description and travel.
    • 1863 January 10
    American Tract Society.
    • 1856 May 6
    • 1858 February 24
    • 1858 May 10
    Amputation.
    • 1862 May 14
    Andover Academy.
    • 1853 September 20, 27, 30
    • 1853 October 12, 17, 23, 26
    • 1853 November 6, 9
    • 1855 August 20
    • 1855 September 13
    • 1856 February 20
    • 1856 June 13
    Andover Academy--Administration.
    • 1856 September 7
    • 1857 September 19, 23
    • 1858 January 10
    Andover Academy--Alumni.
    • 1857 June 30
    Andover Academy--Curriculum.
    • 1856 January 25, 30
    • 1856 February 6
    • 1856 March 14
    • 1856 April 23
    • 1856 May 12
    • 1856 June 4, 7
    • 1857 January 3, 10
    • 1857 February 7, 11
    • 1857 March 1
    • 1857 May 23
    • 1857 September 7, 12
    • 1857 October 24
    • 1863 February 9
    Andover Academy--Examinations.
    • 1858 August 1
    Andover Academy--Faculty.
    • 1856 September 4
    • 1857 September 7
    • 1859 February 13
    Andover Academy--Football.
    • 1857 September 23, 26
    Andover Academy--Presidents.
    • 1856 September 20
    Andover Academy--Religion.
    • 1856 January 25, 30
    • 1856 February 6
    • 1856 March 7
    • 1856 April 23
    • 1857 January 31
    • 1857 May 2
    Andover Academy--Societies, etc.
    • 1856 January 25
    • 1856 May 12, 17
    • 1857 September 19, 26
    • 1858 January 10
    Andover Academy--Songs and music.
    • 1859 May 9
    Andover Academy--Students.
    • 1856 April 22
    • 1857 September 2, 19
    • 1857 December 26
    • 1858 January 10
    • 1858 September 13
    • 1858 October 5
    • 1858 December
    • 1859 February 13
    • 1859 May 4, 9
    • 1859 June 7
    Apprentices--New York (City).
    • 1856 June 25
    Apthorp, E.D.
    • 1853 September 20
    • 1855 October 11
    • 1856 May 27
    • 1856 October 21
    • 1857 January 3, 6, 30
    • 1862 August 12, 13, 14
    Art teachers.
    • 1855 October 12
    Assault and battery.
    • 1856 March 5
    Atheism.
    • 1862 February 4
    Auroras.
    • 1857 September 7
    Austin, Mary Morse.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1855 April 22
    • 1856 March 12
    • 1856 April 14
    • 1857 February 20
    • 1857 July 1
    • 1858 March 11
    • 1861 March 10
    Authors and publishers.
    • 1852 May 12
    • 1852 July 16
    Authorship.
    • 1861 March 3
    • 1861 May 13, 20
    • 1861 June 11
    • 1867 March 28, 30
    • 1867 April 1, 2, 10, 12, 13
    • 1867 May 7, 14, 15, 21, 23, 27
    • 1867 May 21
    • 1867 June 28
    • 1867 July 2, 8, 10, 16, 20, 22, 24, 26, 29
    • 1867 August 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 20, 21
    • 1867 September 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11
    • 1867 October 16, 21
    • 1867 November 12, 15, 16, 29
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4
    • 1870 September 5
    Authorship--Collaboration.
    • 1852 July 16
    • 1852 September 10
    • 1852 December 14
    Autographs.
    • 1856 March 7
    • 1858 November 22, 26
    Bacon, Leonard, 1802-1881.
    • 1858 September 25
    • 1861 January 4
    • 1867 June 28
    Baptism.
    • 1861 March 10
    Barrows, Elijah Porter, 1817-1888.
    • 1856 March 14
    • 1856 May 17
    • 1857 January 10, 17, 24, 31
    • 1857 February 14
    • 1857 March 1
    Bartlett, Samuel Colcord, 1817-1898.
    • 1856 March 7
    Baseball.
    • 1861 September 6
    Battledore and shuttlecock.
    • 1853 September 29
    Beecher, Henry Ward, 1813-1887.
    • 1857 July 11
    Belgium--Description and travel.
    • 1854 August 27
    Bereavement.
    • 1861 March 24
    • 1861 July 27
    Betrothal.
    • 1856 July 17, 19
    • 1857 April 25
    • 1857 July 1
    • 1857 November 16
    • 1859 April 6
    • 1862 September 8
    Bible--Study.
    • 1857 February 11
    • 1857 March 6
    Bible. N.T. Acts.
    • 1856 May 6
    Bible. N.T. Colossians.
    • 1856 May 1
    Bible. N.T. Corinthians.
    • 1853 October 23
    • 1856 March 7, 14
    • 1856 April 27
    • 1856 October 19
    Bible. N.T. Ephesians.
    • 1856 May 18
    Bible. N.T. Hebrews.
    • 1856 November 15
    • 1858 March 11
    Bible. N.T. Joshua.
    • 1856 April 14
    • 1859 January 10
    Bible. N.T. Jude.
    • 1856 November 8
    Bible. N.T. Luke.
    • 1856 January 25
    • 1856 February 20
    Bible. N.T. Mark.
    • 1856 September 20
    Bible. N.T. Matthew.
    • 1856 January 30
    • 1856 May 17
    • 1856 July 19
    • 1856 December 27
    • 1857 January 17
    • 1857 March 18
    • 1857 May 2, 9
    Bible. N.T. Peter.
    • 1856 June 14
    Bible. N.T. Phillipians.
    • 1856 April 16
    Bible. N.T. Philomatheans.
    • 1857 January 3
    • 1857 April 18
    Bible. N.T. Revelations.
    • 1857 March 1
    Bible. N.T. Romans.
    • 1856 March 22
    • 1856 July 12
    • 1857 January 31
    • 1859 January 10
    Bible. N.T. Timothy.
    • 1856 July 2
    • 1857 April 25
    Bible. O.T. Ecclesiastes.
    • 1856 September 9
    Bible. O.T. Esther.
    • 1856 September 25
    • 1856 October 3
    Bible. O.T. Ezekiel.
    • 1856 May 25
    Bible. O.T. Galatians.
    • 1853 October 3
    Bible. O.T. Isaiah.
    • 1857 July 11
    Bible. O.T. Psalms.
    • 1856 June 21
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1857 January 10, 24
    • 1857 February 14
    • 1857 May 23
    Biography.
    • 1864 July 7
    • 1867 March 28, 30
    • 1867 April 1, 2, 10, 12, 13
    • 1867 May 7, 11, 14, 15, 21, 23, 27
    • 1867 June 28
    • 1867 July 2, 8, 10, 16, 20, 22, 24, 26, 29
    • 1867 August 2, 3, 5, 8, 10, 20, 21
    • 1867 September 3, 4, 6, 7, 10, 11
    • 1867 October 16, 21
    • 1867 November 4, 12, 15, 16, 29
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4
    • c. 1868
    • 1870 September 5
    Birthdays.
    • 1853 November 13
    • 1855 September 21
    • 1856 June 18
    • 1856 September 17, 20
    • 1857 November 16
    • 1858 October 2, 11
    Blake, Edward.
    • 1862 August 16
    Boarding schools.
    • 1853 September
    • 1853 September 20, 27, 29, 30
    • 1853 October 12, 17, 21, 23, 26
    • 1853 November 6, 9, 13, 16, 19
    • 1853 December 19
    • 1855 October 11
    • 1855 November 28
    • 1856 March 13, 14
    • 1857 November 6
    Boarding schools--Connecticut.
    • 1854 January 21
    • 1854 March 11
    • 1856 May 16, 27
    • 1857 January 6
    • 1858 February 6
    • c. 1858
    Boats and boating.
    • 1861 August 16
    Boats and boating--Accidents.
    • 1855 October 2
    Books and reading.
    • 1856 September 17, 20
    • 1857 January 7
    • 1857 March 18
    • 1857 April 19
    • 1858 February 6
    • 1858 November 20
    • 1858 December 2, 8
    • 1859 January 19
    • 1859 February 11
    • 1863 March 11
    • 1863 April 1
    Boredom.
    • 1857 February 21
    Bowling.
    • 1861 November 4
    Boyd, Andrew Hunter Holmes, 1814-1865.
    • 1856 May 25
    Boys--Clothing.
    • 1853 October 8, 27
    • 1856 September 25
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1857 April 21
    Boys--Conduct of life.
    • 1853 October 17
    • 1854 January 21
    • 1854 March 11
    • 1855 November 28
    • 1856 November 14
    • 1856 December 31
    • 1857 November 20
    Boys--Education.
    • 1855 August 20
    • 1858 October 2, 6, 7, 11
    • 1858
    • 1859 January 13, 26
    • 1859 February 7
    Boys--Health and hygiene.
    • 1853 October 8, 27
    • 1856 March 6
    • 1856 April 14, 27
    • 1856 May 25, 26
    • 1856 September 2, 20
    • 1856 October 8
    • 1857 January 7
    • 1857 April 21
    Boys--Recreation.
    • 1853 October 27
    • 1855 October 11
    • 1855 November 8
    • 1856 July 13
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1857 June 30
    • 1857 July 3
    • 1857 September 7
    • 1859 January 13
    • 1859 February 7
    Boys--Religious life.
    • 1856 October 21
    • 1857 October 31
    Brothers.
    • See collection description
    Brothers and sisters.
    • See collection description
    Brothers-in-law.
    • 1855 September 24
    • 1855 October 3
    • 1855 November 20
    • 1862 July 28, 30
    Buchanan, James, 1791-1868.
    • 1856 November 7, 8
    Burrage, Joseph P.
    • 1860 July 24
    Bushnell, Horace, 1802-1876.
    • 1853 October 23
    Cables, Submarine.
    • 1857 April 15
    Camp life--Maryland.
    • 1862 October 2
    Camping.
    • 1861 August 16
    Caregivers.
    • 1886 May 28
    Casey, Silas, 1807-1882.
    • 1862 October 6
    Catholic Church.
    • 1856 May 31
    Chamberlain, Daniel Henry, 1835-1907.
    • 1859 June 7
    Charades.
    • 1861 February 25
    Charity.
    • 1858 October 11
    • 1861 June 11
    Charity-schools.
    • 1858 October 13
    Childbirth.
    • 1854 April 23
    • 1859 July 20
    Children's allowances.
    • 1856 October 19
    Children's gardens.
    • 1856 May 27
    Children's parties.
    • 1858 October 11
    Children--Books and reading.
    • 1858 November 13
    Children--Death.
    • 1857 November 6
    • 1859 March 11
    • 1861 March 17, 24
    Children--Institutional care.
    • 1858 October 11
    Children--Recreation.
    • 1853 September 29
    • 1855 September 21
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1856 September 5
    • 1856 December 23
    • 1857 January 3
    • c. 1858
    • 1858 February 6
    Children's drawings.
    • 1856 September 20
    Christian ethics.
    • 1855 November 28
    Christian ethics--Sermons.
    • 1857 April 18
    Christian life.
    • 1857 December 8
    • 1856 April 27
    • 1856 May 6
    • 1856 May 17
    • 1856 May 22
    Christian life--Sermons.
    • 1857 April 25
    Christmas.
    • 1853 October 21
    • 1855 February 26
    • 1856 December 23, 26, 27
    • 1857 January 3, 6
    • 1857 December 26
    • 1857 December
    • 1858 November 13
    • 1862 December 27
    Christmas music.
    • 1853 December 29
    Christmas trees.
    • 1856 December 26
    Church entertainments.
    • 1858 June 22
    Church historians--France.
    • 1852 February 26
    • 1852 May 11
    Church membership.
    • 1853 October 4, 6
    • 1857 May 2
    Church, Annie.
    • 1856 January 27
    • 1858 October 2
    Classical literature--Study and teaching.
    • 1857 January 3, 10
    • 1857 February 7, 11
    • 1857 March 1
    • 1857 May 2, 23
    • 1857 October 24
    • 1858 February 24
    • 1858 October 25
    • 1863 February 9
    Clergy--Biography.
    • 1858 November 26
    Clothing and dress.
    • 1856 March 17
    Colgate, Elizabeth Ann Morse, 1829-1891.
    • 1853 March 31
    • 1853 October 3, 21, 26, 27
    • 1854 April 23
    • 1855 October 3, 12
    • 1856 May 16
    • 1857 February 20
    • 1857 April 27
    • 1857 October 27
    • 1858 February 24
    • 1858 December 8
    • 1859 January 13, 26
    Colgate, Gilbert.
    • 1859 January 26
    Colgate, Richard Morse.
    • 1854 April 23
    • 1855 November 18
    Colgate, Samuel.
    • 1853 March 31
    • 1853 October 27
    • 1854 April 23
    • 1855 May
    • 1855 September 27
    • 1856 March 12
    • 1856 July 13
    • 1856 September 17
    • 1857 July 23
    • 1858 February 24
    College discipline.
    • 1860 June 24
    • 1861 January 4
    College freshmen.
    • 1858 October 30
    College graduates.
    • 1859 July 2
    • 1862 May 26
    • 1862 June 2, 13, 20, 24, 30
    College oratory.
    • 1862 May 26
    • 1862 June 2, 13, 24, 30
    College seniors.
    • 1855 October 21
    • 1856 February 27
    • 1861 November 26
    College students--Conduct of life.
    • 1856 February 27
    • 1856 March 5
    • 1857 September 3
    • 1858 October 25, 30
    • 1858 November 6, 13, 30
    • 1859 March 25
    • 1859 April 6
    • 1861 January 4, 21
    • 1861 June 3
    College students--Examinations.
    • 1858 December 13
    • 1860 June 3
    • 1862 May 20
    College students--Germany.
    • 1863 January 10
    College students--Health and hygiene.
    • 1860 July 2
    College students--Recreation.
    • 1853 October 25
    • 1855 October 21
    • 1856 January 13
    • 1859 July 7
    • 1860 June 3, 10, 24
    • 1860 July 2, 12
    • 1861 February 11
    College students--Religious life.
    • 1856 March 5
    • 1861 March 3
    College students--Social life and customs.
    • 1858 November 13, 30
    • 1859 June 7
    • 1860 July 12
    • 1861 February 3, 25
    College students--Societies, etc.
    • 1853 October 12, 25
    • 1858 November 6
    College students--Travel.
    • 1859 July 5, 7
    College verse.
    • 1853 October 25
    Comets--1858.
    • 1858 October 5
    Communion table.
    • 1863 January 26
    Competition (Psychology).
    • 1856 May 20
    Coney Island (New York, N.Y.).
    • 1857 September 12
    Confederate sympathizers.
    • 1862 August 9
    Confession--Sermons.
    • 1857 May 2
    Confirmation.
    • 1857 October 3, 31
    • 1857 December 8, 21
    Conscience.
    • 1867 September 23
    Conscience--Sermons.
    • 1856 July 12
    Converts from Catholicism.
    • 1856 May 31
    Country life.
    • 1857 April 25
    Courtship.
    • 1856 January 27
    • 1856 May 20
    • 1858 March 17
    • 1858 October 2
    • 1859 May 4
    Cousins.
    • 1855 February 26
    Cricket.
    • 1853 October 25
    • 1855 October 21
    Crosby, Howard, 1826-1891.
    • 1867 October 7
    Daggett, David, 1764-1851.
    • 1861 January 13
    Daguerreotypes.
    • 1856 September 5
    Dana, James Dwight, 1813-1895.
    • 1861 February 3
    Dating (Social customs).
    • 1855 October 2, 21
    Death.
    • 1862 February 4
    • 1862 October 26
    • 1862 November 16
    • 1862 December 8
    • 1863 March 3
    Death--Religious aspects.
    • 1859 March 11
    • 1861 March 17
    Debates and debating.
    • 1856 January 25, 27
    • 1856 February 20
    • 1856 May 12, 17
    • 1857 September 26
    • 1861 January 13
    • 1861 November 26
    • 1862 February 4
    • 1862 October 1
    • 1863 February 9
    Debt.
    • 1857 October 26
    Degrees, Academic.
    • 1856 February 16
    Dental care.
    • 1856 October 8
    • 1858 January 5
    Depression, Mental.
    • 1856 September 25
    Diaries--Authorship.
    • 1856 March 19
    Diet.
    • 1856 March 6
    • 1857 September 26
    Diligence.
    • 1856 November 7
    Donati's Comet.
    • 1858 October 5
    Dormitories--Furniture, equipment, etc.
    • 1857 November 6
    Douglass, Frederick, 1817-1895.
    • 1856 January 30
    Draft.
    • 1862 September 5
    • 1862 October 26
    Drawing.
    • 1857 January 30
    Drill and minor tactics.
    • 1861 March 24
    • 1861 May 20
    Drowning.
    • 1857 July 11
    Duty.
    • 1861 April 22
    • 1861 October 24
    • 1862 June 20
    • 1862 July 8, 21, 23, 27, 28, 30
    • 1862 August 16
    • 1862 September 5
    Dwellings--Remodeling.
    • 1853 December 29
    • 1859 March 17
    Dwight, Timothy, 1828-1916.
    • 1862 January 7
    Dying declarations.
    • 1859 March 11
    Economic conditions--New York (City).
    • 1857 October 26
    Editing.
    • 1853 March 10
    • 1853 March 11
    • 1853 April 23
    • 1853 July 19, 29
    Education.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1853 September 20, 27, 29, 30
    • 1856 February 9
    • 1856 April 24
    • 1857 January 29, 30
    Education--Parent participation.
    • 1853 September 20, 27
    • 1856 January 30
    • 1856 May 6
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1856 October 8
    Election (Theology).
    • 1853 October 4, 6, 8
    • 1856 January 13
    • 1856 February 20
    • 1856 April 16
    • 1856 May 1
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1857 February 3
    Elections.
    • 1856 June 11
    Elementary schools--Curricula.
    • 1859 February 7
    Ellsworth, Elmer Ephraim, 1837-1861.
    • 1861 June 3
    • 1861 June 11
    Elocution.
    • 1856 June 14
    • 1858 December 6
    Emerson, Ralph Waldo, 1803-1882.
    • 1862 February 4
    Employee selection.
    • 1862 August 27
    • 1862 September 11
    Employment.
    • 1862 December 10, 31
    • 1863 January 26
    • 1863 February 3, 4
    • 1867 September 21, 23
    • 1868 October 5, 6
    English language--Composition and exercises.
    • 1856 February 9
    • 1856 May 17
    • 1862 December 27
    English literature--Study and teaching.
    • 1858 December 2
    English--Usage.
    • 1858 February 3
    • 1858 May 25
    Entertaining.
    • 1863 April 11
    Envy.
    • 1855 November 28
    Ethics.
    • 1858 November 10, 22
    Etiquette.
    • 1856 March 17
    Everett, Edward, 1794-1865.
    • 1858
    • 1861 January 13
    Exercise.
    • 1856 February 6
    • 1856 April 14, 27
    • 1856 May 22, 25, 26
    Exposition (Rhetoric).
    • 1858 October 6
    Extemporaneous speaking.
    • 1857 September 19, 23
    Eye--Diseases and defects.
    • 1856 April 22
    Failure (Psychology).
    • 1867 October 21
    Faith.
    • 1853 October 4, 6, 8, 17
    • 1853 November 5, 9
    • 1854 May 16
    • 1855 September 22
    • 1856 January 13
    • 1856 April 16, 24
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1857 April 27
    • 1862 July 28
    • 1862 November 30
    Fall of man--Sermons.
    • 1857 March 6
    Family recreation.
    • 1856 September 9
    • 1857 January 7
    Farewells.
    • 1858 September 13
    Farming.
    • 1861 July 15
    Fast-day sermons.
    • 1861 September 30
    Fathers and daughters.
    • 1856 May 23
    • 1862 April 28
    • 1862 December 11
    Fathers and sons.
    • See collection description
    Felice, Guillaume de, 1803-1871.
    • 1853 March 10
    Fever.
    • 1855 October 3
    Fillmore, Millard, 1800-1874.
    • 1856 October 30
    • 1856 November 8
    Finance, personal.
    • 1855 November 20
    • 1856 March 19, 22
    • 1856 November 18
    • 1856 December 31
    • 1857 January 3
    • 1857 March 7, 14
    • 1857 May 2
    • 1857 July 18
    • 1857 October 21, 27
    • 1858 October 9
    • 1859 January 27
    • 1859 March 11, 31
    • 1859 July 5
    • 1861 June 3
    • 1862 February 17, 22
    • 1862 May 15
    • 1867 September 15
    Fire engines.
    • 1859 February 13
    Firecrackers.
    • 1856 June 21
    • 1857 June 30
    • 1857 July 3
    Fires--Andover (Mass.).
    • 1859 February 13
    Fishing.
    • 1854 September
    • 1860 August 9
    • 1861 September 20
    Floods--New Haven (Conn.).
    • 1861 February 3
    Flying Cloud.
    • 1856 June 11
    Football.
    • 1853 September 30
    • 1853 October 12, 25
    • 1855 October 21
    • 1855 November 28
    Footwear.
    • 1856 September 3
    Fourth of July.
    • 1856 June 21
    • 1856 July 2
    • 1857 June 30
    • 1857 July 3
    • 1859 July 5
    France--History--Second Empire, 1852-1870.
    • 1852 May 11
    • 1852 September 10
    France--Literature.
    • 1852 February 26
    • 1852 May 11
    • 1852 July 16
    • 1852 December 14
    • 1853 March 10, 11
    • 1853 April 23
    France--Religion.
    • 1852 May 11
    • 1852 September 10
    • 1852 October 27
    Free will and determinism--Sermons.
    • 1857 March 1
    Fremont, John Charles, 1813-1890.
    • 1856 October 30
    French language--Study and teaching.
    • 1856 April 27
    Friendship.
    • See collection description
    Frostbite.
    • 1856 January 13
    Funeral sermons.
    • 1857 July 11
    Furuncles.
    • 1855 September 27
    • 1856 September 17
    Gannett, Ezra Stiles, 1801-1871.
    • 1856 January 25
    Gardening.
    • 1854 April 23
    • 1856 May 16
    Geometry.
    • 1857 September 12, 26
    German language--Study and teaching.
    • 1856 April 27
    • 1861 February 3
    • 1861 May 13, 27
    Germany--Description and travel.
    • 1854 August 27
    Gifts.
    • 1855 February 26
    • 1855 September 21
    • 1856 September 20
    • 1856 December 26
    • 1857 January 6, 28
    • 1857 November 16
    • 1857 December
    • 1858 October 2
    • 1858 November 13
    • 1862 December 27
    Glory of God--Sermons.
    • 1856 June 21
    God--Love.
    • 1856 June 4
    God--Love--Sermons.
    • 1856 July 26
    God-Will.
    • 1862 September 5
    Gough, John Bartholomew, 1817-1886.
    • 1856 May 22
    Grading and marking (Students).
    • 1859 July 5
    Great Britain--Description and travel.
    • 1881 August 15
    Greek language--Study and teaching.
    • 1856 March 14
    • 1856 April 16, 23
    • 1856 May 1, 6
    • 1857 January 3
    • 1858 September 17
    Greek literature--Study and teaching.
    • 1856 May 12
    • 1856 June 4, 7
    • 1861 January 13
    Hadley, James, 1821-1872.
    • 1861 February 11
    Harvard University--Admission.
    • 1859 May 9
    Harvard University--Curricula.
    • 1858 November 30
    Harvard University--Examinations.
    • 1858 October 5
    • 1859 July 5
    • 1862 June 24
    Harvard University--Football.
    • 1858 October 5
    Harvard University--Rites and ceremonies.
    • 1859 July 5
    • 1862 June 24
    Harvard University--Rowing.
    • 1859 July 5
    Hazing--Yale University.
    • 1858 October 25, 30
    Health.
    • 1853 December 29
    • 1854 January 4
    • 1861 June 27
    • 1861 September 6, 9, 13, 30
    • 1861 October 24
    • 1867 November 12
    Health education.
    • 1857 January 17, 23, 24
    Hidden God--Sermons.
    • 1857 May 16
    Historians--France.
    • 1852 February 26
    • 1852 May 11, 12
    • 1852 July 16
    • 1852 September 10
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1852 December 14
    Hitchcock, Roswell Dwight, 1817-1887.
    • 1857 March 18
    Hodge, Aspinwall.
    • 1857 December 1
    • 1858 October 2
    • 1859 July 20
    Hodge, Charles, 1797-1878.
    • 1856 May 18
    Hodge, Charlotte Morse, 1833-1907.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1856 May 16
    • 1856 June 18
    • 1856 July 17, 19
    • 1857 January 29
    • 1857 April 27
    • 1857 May 23
    • 1857 December 1
    • 1858 October 2
    • 1859 July 20
    Hodge, James Aspinwall.
    • 1856 July 17
    Holidays.
    • 1857 September 12
    Holland, William.
    • 1859 July 14
    Holland--Description and travel.
    • 1854 August 27
    Home economics.
    • 1857 January 29
    Homeopathic physicians--New York (City).
    • 1856 September 25
    Homesickness.
    • 1853 September 27, 29
    • 1855 September 13, 22
    • 1856 April 16, 24
    • 1856 September 2, 7
    • 1861 January 4
    Horsemanship.
    • 1855 August 20
    • 1856 June 18
    House buying.
    • 1859 January 10, 26
    • 1859 February 11, 18
    House construction.
    • 1859 April 6
    House furnishings.
    • 1859 March 17
    Households.
    • 1856 March 12
    • 1856 May 23
    Hudson River (N.Y. and N.J.)--Description and travel.
    • 1861 August 16
    Husbands and wives.
    • 1857 July 23
    Illustration of books.
    • 1867 September 4, 10
    Inheritance and succession.
    • 1862 October
    Inventions.
    • 1868 February 4, 26
    Invitation cards.
    • 1859 May
    Jesus Christ--Temptation--Sermons.
    • 1856 June 11
    Journalism.
    • 1861 October 24
    • 1867 October 19
    • 1868 September 21
    • 1869 November 29
    Journalism, Religious.
    • 1857 October 24, 27
    Journalism--Editing.
    • 1867 October 7
    • 1867 November 10
    Kemble, Frances Anne, 1809-1893.
    • 1857 November 20
    Kennaway, John.
    • 1881 August 15
    Kitchel, Cornelius Ladd.
    • 1857 October 29
    • 1858 September 13
    Kites.
    • 1854 September 19
    Landlord and tenant--New York (City).
    • 1857 October 26
    Language and languages--Study and teaching.
    • 1854 September 19
    Larned, William Augustus, 1806-1862.
    • 1861 March 17
    • 1862 February 4
    Latin language--Study and teaching.
    • 1856 January 30
    • 1856 February 6
    • 1856 March 14
    • 1856 April 23
    Latin literature--Study and teaching.
    • 1856 June 7
    Law (Theology)--Biblical teaching--Sermons.
    • 1857 January 24
    Lawsuits.
    • 1857 September 23
    Learning and scholarship.
    • 1855 September 22, 24
    • 1855 November 28
    Lectures and lecturing.
    • 1855 November 28
    • 1856 January 30
    • 1856 May 22
    • 1857 January 29
    • 1861 January 13
    • 1861 March 17
    Lent.
    • 1857 March 18
    Letter-writing.
    • 1853 November 16
    • 1854 March 11
    • 1855 November 18
    • 1856 November 14
    • 1857 January 31
    • 1857 February 27
    • 1858 September 25
    • 1858 October 13
    Letters.
    • 1858 November 10, 22
    Libraries, Private.
    • 1857 July 23
    • 1861 September 6
    Lincoln, Abraham, 1809-1865.
    • 1861 March 10
    Literary ethics.
    • 1867 March 28, 30
    • 1867 April 1, 2, 12, 13
    • 1867 May 15, 21, 23, 27
    • 1867 June 28
    • 1867 July 2, 8, 10, 16, 20, 22, 24, 26, 29
    • 1867 August 2, 3, 20
    • 1867 September 3, 6, 7, 10
    • 1867 November 15
    • ca. 1867 May 21
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4
    • 1870 September 5
    Lodging-houses.
    • 1856 November 8, 14
    • 1856 December 16
    • 1857 October 29, 31
    • 1857 November 14
    • 1858 November 6, 20
    • 1861 December 5
    Loneliness.
    • 1863 January 27
    Loomis, Elias, 1811-1889.
    • 1861 February 11, 25
    • 1861 May 13
    Love.
    • 1861 July 27
    Loyalty.
    • 1862 August 12
    Lyceums.
    • 1856 January 25, 30
    Marching.
    • 1861 May 13
    Marriage.
    • 1853 March 31
    • 1853 April 23
    Massachusetts--Description and travel.
    • 1856 September 9
    Mauch Chunk (Pa.)--Description and travel.
    • 1857 July 1
    • 1857 December 1
    • 1861 July 29
    May Day.
    • 1856 May 12
    Military service, Voluntary.
    • 1861 March 24
    • 1861 April 22
    Millennium.
    • 1857 December 19
    Moral education.
    • 1856 October 21
    Morse family--Dwellings.
    • 1858 December 8
    • 1859 February 18
    Morse family--Views on politics.
    • 1856 October 30
    • 1856 November 7, 8
    Morse family--Voyages and travels.
    • See collection description
    Morse, Harriott Messinger, 1805-1885.
    • 1856 June 27
    Morse, Jedediah, 1761-1826.
    • 1856 May 12
    • 1858 November 10, 22
    • 1864 July 7
    • 1867 March 28, 30
    • 1867 April 1
    • 1867 May 15, 21, 23, 27
    • 1867 June 28
    • 1867 July 2, 8, 10, 16, 24, 26, 29
    • 1867 August 2, 3,5, 8, 10, 20
    • 1867 September 3, ,6, 7, 10
    • 1867 October 16, 21
    • 1867 November 4, 15, 29
    • ca. 1867 May 21
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4
    • 1870 September 5
    Morse, Louisa, 1837-1917.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1853 October 3
    • 1853 November 13
    • 1856 May 6
    • 1856 June 7
    • 1856 July 8
    • 1856 October 30
    • 1858 March 11
    Morse, Nollie Oliver Cromwell, 1847-1922.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1858 January 5
    • 1858 October 6, 7
    • 1881 August 15
    Morse, Rebecca.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1856 March 12
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1857 February 27
    • 1858 January 5
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1795-1868.
    • 1867 April 13
    • 1867 May 23
    • 1867 July 26
    • 1867 November 12, 16
    • ca. 1867 May 21
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1795-1868--Views on Civil War.
    • 1861 June 3
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1795-1868--Views on Secession.
    • 1861 February 19
    • 1861 March 17
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1795-1868--Views on Slavery.
    • 1861 January 27
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1841-1926.
    • 1852 May 12
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1867 April 2
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1841-1926--Views on Abraham Lincoln.
    • 1861 March 10
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1841-1926--Views on Civil War.
    • 1861 June 3
    • 1861 July 15
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1841-1926--Views on Secession.
    • 1861 February 19
    • 1861 March 17
    Morse, Richard Cary, 1841-1926--Views on Slavery.
    • 1861 January 27
    Morse, Samuel Finley Breese, 1791-1872.
    • 1856 March 7
    • 1856 May 18
    • 1856 June 4, 7
    • 1857 April 15, 21
    • 1857 October 21
    • 1858 July 12
    • 1859 January 26
    • 1867 July 20
    Morse, Sidney Edwards, 1794-1871.
    • 1852 May 11
    • 1856 May 18
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1857 October 27
    • 1858 November 10
    • 1858 December 8
    • 1867 March 28
    • 1867 April 10
    • 1867 May 14, 21
    • 1867 July 8, 16
    • 1867 August 3, 20
    • 1867 September 10, 21
    • 1867 October 19
    • 1867 November 15
    • 1870 September 5
    Morse Jr., Sidney Edwards, 1835-1908.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1853 September 20
    • 1853 October 3
    • 1853 November 13
    • 1856 March 12
    • 1856 June 18
    • 1856 July 17
    • 1857 February 20
    • 1857 March 13
    • 1857 April 15
    • 1857 July 1
    • 1858 March 11
    • 1858 December 8
    • 1861 November 4
    Morse, William Henry, 1846-1940.
    • 1852 October 27
    • 1853 October 21
    • 1853 November 16
    • 1853 December 29
    • 1854 January 4
    • 1856 May 27
    • 1858 October 6, 11
    • 1861 February 25
    • 1867 November 10
    Mortality.
    • 1861 March 24
    Mothers--Death.
    • 1852 October 27
    Murder.
    • 1857 February 13
    Natural history museums--Harvard University.
    • 1859 May 9
    Nature.
    • 1854 September
    • 1856 June 5
    Nephews.
    • 1854 May 16
    • 1855 May
    • 1855 November 18
    • 1856 September 10
    • 1859 July 20
    Neurasthenia.
    • 1867 November 12
    New York (State)--Description and travel.
    • 1861 August 13, 16
    New York Observer.
    • 1852 February 26
    • 1852 May 11
    • 1853 July 19
    • 1867 September 21, 23
    • 1867 October 7, 19
    • 1868 September 21
    • 1868 October 5, 6
    • 1869 November 29, 30
    Newspaper publishing--New York (City).
    • 1856 June 25
    Newspapers.
    • 1867 September 21
    • 1868 October 5, 6
    Observatories.
    • 1860 August 17
    Occupations.
    • 1867 September 21
    Ocean travel.
    • 1856 May 18
    • 1856 July 17
    Ocean--Measurement.
    • 1868 February 4, 26
    Oceanographic instruments.
    • 1868 February 26
    Oratory.
    • 1861 January 13
    • 1861 March 17
    Ordination.
    • 1867 October 7
    Paganism.
    • 1857 January 23
    Palisades (N.J. and N.Y.)--Description and travel.
    • 1861 August 13
    Paper money.
    • 1857 September 7
    Park, Edwards Amasa, 1808-1890.
    • 1856 June 21
    • 1856 July 12, 19
    • 1856 October 4
    • 1857 June 30
    • 1857 July 18
    • 1857 December 19
    Patriotism.
    • 1861 April 22
    • 1861 June 3
    • 1862 February 17
    • 1862 July 21, 30
    • 1862 August 9, 16
    Patriotism--Yale University.
    • 1861 March 24
    Paul, the Apostle, Saint--Sermons.
    • 1857 April 25
    Penmanship.
    • 1856 October 30
    • 1856 November 14
    • 1857 January 7
    Phelps, Austin, 1820-1890.
    • 1857 March 7, 14
    • 1857 July 11
    Phillips, Wendell, 1811-1884.
    • 1861 March 17
    Photography.
    • 1856 July 3
    • 1863 February 11
    Physical education and training.
    • 1857 January 23
    • 1860 June 10
    • 1860 July 2
    Physical sciences--Study and teaching.
    • 1861 February 11, 25
    Pierce, Franklin, 1804-1869.
    • 1856 October 4
    Plagiarism.
    • 1867 July 24
    Poetry.
    • 1853 November 13
    • 1856 September 20
    • 1863 January 27
    Porter, Noah, 1811-1892.
    • 1861 May 13
    • 1862 May 9
    Posture.
    • 1856 September 2
    Prayer.
    • 1853 October 6
    • 1853 November 5
    • 1856 April 27
    • 1862 December 27
    Prayer meetings.
    • 1856 January 25
    Prayer--Sermons.
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1861 January 4
    Preaching.
    • 1857 March 14
    • 1858 October 13
    Presidents--United States--Election-- 1856.
    • 1856 October 4, 30
    • 1856 November 7, 8
    Presidents--United States--Inaugural addresses.
    • 1861 March 10
    Princeton University--Curricula.
    • 1857 September 3
    Princeton University--Societies, etc.
    • 1857 September 3
    Princeton University--Students.
    • 1857 September 3
    Printers.
    • 1867 June 21
    • 1867 November 25
    Procrastination.
    • 1861 May 20
    Prodigal son (Parable)--Sermons.
    • 1856 September 17, 25
    • 1856 October 3
    Protestantism.
    • 1853 July 19
    Public speaking.
    • 1856 June 4
    Publishers and publishing.
    • 1867 April 1, 10. 13
    • 1867 May 14
    • 1867 June 21
    • 1867 November 25
    Quarreling.
    • 1867 August 5, 8, 10
    Quoits.
    • 1855 September 21
    Redemption--Sermons.
    • 1858 December 2
    Regeneration (Theology)--Sermons.
    • 1857 March 7, 14
    Religion.
    • 1863 January 10, 26
    • 1853 September 27
    • 1853 October 3
    Religions--Relations.
    • 1867 May 21, 27
    • 1867 July 24
    • 1867 August 2, 8, 10, 21
    • 1867 September 3, 6
    • ca. 1867 May 21
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4
    Religious awakening.
    • 1857 November 6
    • 1858 February 1, 24
    Religious literature.
    • 1856 April 16
    Religious tolerance.
    • 1853 July 19
    • 1853 November 6
    • 1856 May 31
    Religious tolerance--France.
    • 1852 May 11
    • 1852 September 10
    Remarriage.
    • 1856 June 27
    • 1856 July 2, 3, 8
    Reminiscing.
    • 1858 October 5
    • c. 1859
    • 1862 October 8
    • 1863 January 27
    • 1864 July 7
    • 1867 November 4
    • 1868 January 9
    • 1868 February 4, 26
    Rental housing--New Haven (Conn.).
    • 1862 February 17, 22
    • 1862 March 5
    Repentance--Sermons.
    • 1857 May 9
    Resorts--Maine.
    • 1860 August 9
    Resorts--New York (State).
    • 1856 June 5
    Rest-- Religious aspects--Christianity.
    • 1856 April 23, 27
    Retirement.
    • 1859 January 26
    Riddles.
    • n.d.
    Riots.
    • 1856 March 5
    Rites and ceremonies--Yale University.
    • 1861 June 17
    River steamers.
    • 1856 May 6, 12
    Russell, William, 1798-1873.
    • 1856 June 14
    Sabbath.
    • 1857 March 13
    • 1856 April 23, 27
    Salary.
    • 1868 September 21
    • 1868 October 5
    Salisbury family.
    • 1861 July 8
    Salisbury, Edward Elbridge, 1814-1901.
    • 1858 September 25, 30
    • 1858 October 11, 20
    • 1858 November 6, 20
    • 1861 June 11
    Salvation.
    • 1853 October 6, 8, 17
    • 1853 November 5
    • 1854 May 16
    • 1856 January 13
    • 1856 March 7
    • 1856 April 16
    • 1856 May 1, 12, 18, 25
    • 1857 February 3, 13, 14
    • 1857 April 27
    • 1859 March 11
    • 1862 December 27
    Salvation--Sermons.
    • 1857 February 7
    • 1857 July 18
    Savery, Mr.
    • 1857 September 23
    • 1857 October 10, 21, 26
    Saving and thrift.
    • 1856 September 17
    • 1856 October 19
    • 1856 December 31
    • 1862 May 15
    Scarlatina.
    • 1853 November 16
    Scholarly publishing.
    • 1852 May 12
    • 1852 July 16
    School orations.
    • 1857 September 7
    Secession.
    • 1861 February 11
    • 1861 March 17
    • 1861 September 30
    Secession--South Carolina.
    • 1861 January 21
    Seminarians.
    • 1862 September 5
    • 1862 October 8
    • 1862 November 19
    • 1862 December 8
    • 1863 March 28
    • 1863 April 1
    Sermons.
    • 1853 October 3, 23
    • 1853 November 6
    • 1856 January 25, 30
    • 1856 February 6, 20
    • 1856 March 14, 22
    • 1856 April 14, 16, 23, 27
    • 1856 May 1, 6, 16, 17, 18, 22, 25, 31
    • 1856 June 4, 14, 29
    • 1856 July 19
    • 1856 September 7, 20, 25
    • 1856 October 19
    • 1856 November 8
    • 1856 December 27
    • 1857 January 3, 10, 17
    • 1857 February 14, 20, 21
    • 1857 March 18
    • 1857 May 23
    • 1857 June 30
    • c. 1857
    • 1858 March 11
    • 1858 September 25
    • 1859 January 10
    • 1867 March 30
    • 1867 October 7
    Sewing-machines.
    • 1857 January 29
    Sharon Springs (N.Y.)--Description and travel.
    • 1856 July 24
    Silliman, Benjamin, 1816-1885.
    • 1861 February 3
    Sin.
    • 1856 February 20
    • 1856 March 7
    • 1857 February 13
    Sin--Sermons.
    • 1856 September 9
    • 1857 January 31
    Sisters.
    • 1861 September 30
    Skates.
    • 1853 October 27
    Skating.
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1859 February 7, 11, 13
    • 1860 December 13
    • 1861 February 11
    • 1863 February 9
    Slang.
    • 1857 May 2
    Slavery in the Bible.
    • 1861 January 27
    Slavery--Anti-slavery movements.
    • 1858 February 24
    • 1858 May 10
    Slavery--Justification.
    • 1861 January 27
    Slavery--United States.
    • 1858 February 3
    Sledding.
    • 1853 October 27
    Sleds.
    • 1856 December 16, 20
    Sleeping customs.
    • 1853 October 10
    Sleighing.
    • 1861 February 3
    Smith, J.F.
    • 1862 September 11
    Snow--Connecticut.
    • 1859 January 19
    Snow--New York (City).
    • 1859 February 7
    Soldiers--Books and reading.
    • 1861 June 11
    Soldiers--Conduct of life.
    • 1862 May 14
    Soldiers--Health and hygiene.
    • 1862 November 16
    Soldiers--Relations.
    • 1862 October 6
    Sons of Temperance--Cambridge (Mass.).
    • 1859 May 9
    Speech therapy--Exercises.
    • 1857 January 23
    Speeches, addresses, etc.
    • 1861 January 21
    Spinsters.
    • 1856 July 19
    Sprague, William Buell, 1795-1876.
    • 1858 November 26
    • 1867 March 30
    • 1867 April 1
    • 1867 May 12, 15
    • 1867 July 20, 29
    • 1867 August 10
    • 1867 September 3, 6
    • 1867 October 19
    • 1867 November 15, 29
    Sprague, William Buell, 1795-1876-- Conduct of life.
    • 1858 November 10, 22
    Sprague, William Buell, 1795-1876--Health.
    • 1867 May 14
    Steamboats.
    • 1856 May 18
    Stebbins, Henry H.
    • 1862 August 26
    Stepmothers.
    • 1856 June 27, 29
    • 1856 July 13
    • 1856 September 5, 25
    • 1856 October 8, 21
    • 1857 February 13
    • 1857 October 26, 31
    • 1858 October 11
    • 1862 April 17, 28
    • 1862 May 14
    Stepmothers and sons.
    • 1857 April 27
    Stowe, Calvin Ellis, 1802-1886.
    • 1856 January 30
    • 1856 February 6
    • 1856 November 15
    • 1856 December 20
    • 1857 January 3
    • 1857 April 18
    • 1857 July 11
    Stowe, Harriet Beecher, 1811-1896.
    • 1859 January 19
    • 1859 February 11
    Student expulsion--Yale University.
    • 1858 October 25, 30
    Student newspapers and periodicals.
    • 1861 October 24
    Students--Conduct of life.
    • 1853 October 12, 23, 26
    • 1853 November 6, 9, 16
    • 1856 May 18, 22
    • 1856 June 13
    • 1856 September 7, 9, 20
    • 1856 October 19
    • 1856 November 15
    • 1856 December 27
    • 1857 January 31
    • 1857 October 10, 29, 31
    • 1857 November 6, 14
    • 1858 January 10
    • 1858 September 13
    • 1858 November 20, 30
    • 1862 July 20
    • 1862 October 1
    Students--Expulsion.
    • 1858 November 30
    Students--Health and hygiene.
    • 1856 May 22
    • 1856 July 8
    • 1857 January 17, 23, 24
    Students--Political activity.
    • 1856 June 7
    Students--Recreation.
    • 1853 December 19
    • 1856 February 6
    • 1856 June 18
    • 1856 July 2
    • 1857 September 19, 23, 26
    • 1858 September 25
    • 1861 June 27
    • 1862 October 1
    Students--Religious life.
    • 1856 January 25, 27
    • 1856 March 7
    • 1857 January 31
    • 1857 February 14
    Students--Social life and customs.
    • 1856 July 3
    • 1857 December 26
    • c. 1857
    Students--Societies, etc.
    • 1856 February 20
    • 1856 June
    • 1858 February 3
    • 1858 September 17
    Students--Travel.
    • 1857 April 24, 25
    Success.
    • 1857 February 3
    • 1858 October 13
    • 1867 November 10
    Suffering--Religious aspects--Sermons.
    • 1856 November 15
    Sunday schools--Growth--United States.
    • 1861 February 25
    Swimming.
    • 1856 June 7
    • 1860 August 9
    Switzerland--Description and travel.
    • 1854 August 27
    Taylor, Samuel Harvey, 1807-1871.
    • 1856 September 20
    • 1857 September 7, 19, 23
    • 1857 November 6, 14
    Teacher-student relationships.
    • 1854 September
    • 1855 August 20
    • 1855 November 28
    • 1858 January 14
    • 1858 October 13
    • c. 1859
    • 1862 August 9
    Teachers.
    • 1858 November 30
    Teaching.
    • 1861 July 15
    • 1862 March 14
    • 1862 May 20
    • 1862 June 20
    • 1862 August 27
    • 1862 September 11
    • 1862 October 26
    • 1862 December 10, 31
    • 1863 February 3, 4
    Telegraph cables.
    • 1857 April 15
    Temperance.
    • 1856 May 22
    • 1859 May 9
    Temptation.
    • 1856 January 27
    • 1857 September 23
    • 1857 December 19
    Temptation--Sermons.
    • 1856 June 7
    Thanksgiving.
    • 1856 November 8, 14
    • 1860 November 27
    • 1862 November 19
    Thanksgiving--Sermons.
    • 1858 October 13
    • 1858 November 20
    Theological seminaries--Curricula.
    • 1862 October 8
    • 1862 November 19
    • 1862 December 8
    • 1863 April 1
    Thornwell, James Henley, 1812-1862.
    • 1856 May 18
    Toothache.
    • 1859 January 10
    Transportation--Fares.
    • 1853 November 19
    Troy University--Troy (N.Y.).
    • 1862 October 26
    Tuberculosis.
    • 1859 February 11
    Tyng, Stephen Higginson, 1800-1885.
    • 1856 September 17, 25
    • 1856 October 3, 19
    • 1857 February 11
    • 1857 March 6, 18
    • 1858 December 2
    • 1859 January 10
    Typhoid fever--New Haven (Conn.).
    • 1861 March 24
    Unemployment.
    • 1862 November 30
    United States--Economic conditions.
    • 1857 October 10
    United States--Foreign relations--Cuba.
    • 1858 February 3
    United States--History-- Civil War, 1861-1865--War work.
    • 1861 June 11
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • 1861 October 24
    • 1862 July 28
    • 1862 October 2, 6, 25
    • 1862 November 16
    • 1863 January 10
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Civilian relief.
    • 1862 May 14
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Foreign opinion.
    • 1861 May 27
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Hospitals.
    • 1862 May 14
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Public opinion.
    • 1861 April 22
    • 1861 September 30
    • 1861 November 4
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Veterans.
    • 1862 October 1
    United States. Army of the Potomac.
    • 1862 February 17
    United States. Army--Connecticut Infantry Regiment, 15th, Co.G.
    • 1862 October 6
    • 1862 November 16
    United States. Army--Enlistment.
    • 1861 November 11, 20
    United States. Army--Military life.
    • 1862 October 6
    • 1862 November 16
    United States. Army--Officers.
    • 1862 October 6
    Universalism.
    • 1853 July 19
    Universalists.
    • 1856 May 25
    Universities and colleges--Athletics.
    • 1860 June 24
    Universities and colleges--Curricula.
    • 1855 September 17
    Vacations.
    • 1854 September
    • 1861 July 8
    • 1861 August 13
    Vaill, Joseph,1750-1838.
    • 1868 February 26
    Vices.
    • 1857 February 27
    Visiting cards.
    • n.d.
    Vocation.
    • 1856 April 27
    • 1862 July 8
    • 1863 March 28
    • 1867 September 21
    Vocation (in religious orders, congregations, etc.).
    • 1858 January 14
    • 1858 May 10, 25
    Vocational guidance.
    • 1862 March 14
    • 1862 June 20
    Wagers.
    • 1858 September 13
    Wardwell, Doctor.
    • 1857 April 25
    • 1857 May 2
    Weddings.
    • 1857 April 27
    • 1859 May
    Winter storms--New Haven (Conn.).
    • 1862 January 30
    Women.
    • 1857 January 30
    Women--Conduct of life.
    • 1858 October 13
    Women--Education.
    • 1853 November 13
    • 1856 October 30
    • 1858 February 6
    • 1858 December 6
    • 1862 March 5
    • 1862 December 11
    Women--Recreation.
    • 1856 May 23
    • 1858 December 8
    • 1859 February 7, 11
    • 1859 July 14
    Women--Social and moral questions.
    • 1858 September 30
    • 1858 November 13
    Women--Societies and clubs.
    • 1858 March 11
    Woods, Leonard, 1807-1878.
    • 1857 June 30
    Woods, Leonard, 1774-1854.
    • 1853 October 8
    • 1853 October 17
    • 1853 November 9
    Woolsey Family.
    • 1856 September 5, 9
    • 1861 July 8
    Woolsey, Laura, d. 1861.
    • 1861 March 24
    Woolsey, Theodore Dwight, 1801-1889.
    • 1856 June 4
    • 1861 March 17
    • 1861 September 30
    • 1867 June 28
    Wounds and injuries.
    • 1853 November 9
    Yale University.
    • 1853 October 25
    • 1855 September 17
    • 1856 January 13
    Yale University--Admissions.
    • c. 1858
    Yale University--Awards.
    • 1861 June 17
    • 1861 November 26
    • 1862 June 2, 13
    Yale University--Curricula.
    • 1858 September 17
    • 1858 October 25
    • 1858 December 2
    • 1860 July 12
    • 1860 December 13
    • 1861 January 13, 21
    • 1861 February 3, 11
    • 1861 May 13
    • 1861 September 20
    • 1862 January 7, 30
    • 1862 May 9, 26
    Yale University--Examinations.
    • 1856 May 20
    • 1860 July 12
    • 1862 May 9, 26
    Yale University--Faculty.
    • 1860 July 24
    • 1861 September 20
    • 1862 January 7
    • 1862 February 4
    • 1862 May 9
    • 1856 March 5
    Yale University--Faculty--Views on Secession.
    • 1861 February 11
    Yale University--History-- Civil War.
    • 1861 January 21
    • 1861 February 11
    • 1861 May 13, 27
    Yale University--Presidents.
    • 1856 June 4
    Yale University--Religion.
    • 1856 May 20
    • 1861 March 3
    Yale University--Riots.
    • 1856 March 5
    Yale University--Rites and ceremonies.
    • 1862 May 26
    • 1862 June 2
    • 1862 June 13
    • 1862 June 30
    Yale University--Rowing.
    • 1859 July 7
    • 1860 June 3, 10, 24
    • 1860 July 12, 24
    • 1861 May 20
    • 1861 June 17
    Yale University--Societies, etc.
    • 1856 June
    • 1857 January 29
    • 1858 January 10
    • 1858 July 12
    • 1859 June 7
    • 1861 January 13
    • 1861 June 17
    • 1861 November 11
    Yale University--Students.
    • 1853 October 12
    • 1856 February 27
    • 1858 March 17
    Yale University--Students-- Political Acivity.
    • 1861 January 21
    Young Men's Christian Association.
    • 1883 May 14
    Young men--Books and reading.
    • 1858 October 5, 6
    • 1860 August 9
    • 1860 December 13
    • 1861 May 13
    • 1863 January 27
    Young men--Clothing.
    • 1859 January 15
    • 1862 February 22
    Young men--Conduct of life.
    • See collection description
    Young men--Death.
    • 1857 July 11
    Young men--Exercise.
    • 1858 October 2
    Young men--Health and hygiene.
    • 1856 July 17
    • 1858 October 25
    Young men--Recreation.
    • 1858 October 2, 6
    • 1858 December
    • 1859 February 13
    • 1860 August 9, 17
    • 1860 December 13
    • 1861 July 8, 29
    • 1861 August 13, 16
    • 1862 August 26
    • 1863 February 9
    Young men--Religious life.
    • 1857 April 27
    Young men--Social life and customs.
    • 1863 April 11
    Young men--Tobacco use.
    • 1858 September 13