Manuscripts Division
William L. Clements Library
University of Michigan

Finding aid for
William Hope Letters, 1862-1866

Finding aid created by
Meg Hixon, May 2012

Summary Information
Title: William Hope letters
Creator: Atkin, Peter, and Atkin, George
Inclusive dates: 1862-1866
Extent: 10 items
Abstract:
Peter Atkin of Liverpool, England, and his son George received 10 letters regarding Peter's nephew, Englishman William D. Hope, between 1862 and 1866. Hope, an aspiring pharmacist, wrote 5 letters to his uncle and 3 letters to his cousin about his desperate financial situation, his attempts to find work in England, his experiences serving with the Union Army in the Civil War, and his life in Illinois in the year following the war. Two other acquaintances wrote to Peter Atkin about a visit Hope made to Nova Scotia in 1862 and about Hope's financial hardships.

Language: The material is in English
Repository: William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan
909 S. University Ave.
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190
Phone: 734-764-2347
Web Site: www.clements.umich.edu


Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

1987. M-2364.

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research.

Copyright:

Copyright status is unknown

Processing Information:

Cataloging funded by the National Historical Publications and Records Commission (NHPRC). This collection has been processed according to minimal processing procedures and may be revised, expanded, or updated in the future.

Preferred Citation:

William Hope letters, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan


Arrangement

The collection is arranged chronologically.


Biography

William D. Hope, a second generation pharmacist and native of England, traveled to Newport, Nova Scotia, in the early 1860s, where he briefly studied under Dr. William Denison. In September 1862, he went back to England destitute, and unsuccessfully sought work in Liverpool, Brighton, and Greater London. Hope returned to North America in 1863, and lived in New York and Massachusetts before joining the Union Army. He served as a medicine dispenser at Hart Island, New York, and as a clerk at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee. After the war, he lived in St. Louis, Missouri, and Chicago, Illinois.

Hope's uncle, Peter Atkin, originally a native of Blackburn, England, lived in Liverpool in the 1860s. He and his wife, Alice Hope, also a native of Blackburn, had several children, including George Atkin of Rock Ferry, England. Alice's siblings included John, David, Jane, and Sarah.


Collection Scope and Content Note

Peter Atkin of Liverpool, England, and his son George received 10 letters regarding Peter's nephew, Englishman William D. Hope, between 1862 and 1866. Hope, an aspiring pharmacist, wrote 5 letters to his uncle and 3 letters to his cousin about his desperate financial situation, his attempts to find work in England, his experiences serving with the Union Army in the Civil War, and his life in Illinois in the year following the war. Two other acquaintances wrote Atkin about a visit Hope made to Nova Scotia in 1862 and about Hope's financial hardships.

Dr. William Denison of Newport, Nova Scotia, wrote Peter Atkin on August 6, 1862, concerning William D. Hope's recent professional visit and his local love affair, since broken off. William D. Hope wrote the following 4 letters to Peter Atkin and George Atkin, his uncle and cousin, respectively, while traveling around England between September 22, 1862, and May 2, 1863. Hope discussed his unsuccessful love affair with "Miss Paint" in Nova Scotia, and lamented his poor financial fortunes. He described his attempts to find work, as well as his difficulties in doing so, which he attributed to the machinations of a relative, David Hope. In his letter of September 22, 1862, he mentioned the dampening effect the Civil War had on business affairs in North America. Andrew Paton also wrote to Peter Atkin on January 26, 1863, expressing his displeasure at Hope's situation and his failure to call on Paton in Glasgow, Scotland.

Hope's letters from North America begin on December 1, 1863. In the 4 letters that follow, he described his work for the Union Army at Hart Island, New York, and at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee (2 letters, December 1, 1863, and January 19, 1865, 13 pages), as well as various aspects of his life after the war (2 letters, August 8, 1865, and August 20, 1866, 9 pages). He reported on his experiences as a medicine dispenser for a hospital on Hart Island, recounted his travels from New York to Tennessee, and explained his duties with the quartermaster's department at Lookout Mountain. He also commented on the progress of the war, on the perceived American prejudice against Englishmen, and on the war's effects in Illinois. In his letter of December 1, 1863, he described the New York City draft riots of 1863, during which he was almost fatally shot, and he mentioned the recent hanging of the Lincoln assassination conspirators in his letter of August 8, 1865.

Subject Terms

    Subjects:
    • British--United States--History--19th century.
    • Chicago (Ill.)
    • Draft Riot, New York, N.Y., 1863.
    • Finance, Personal.
    • Hart Island (N.Y.)
    • Liverpool (England)
    • Lookout Mountain (Ga.)
    • Lookout Mountain (Tenn.)
    • Pharmacists.
    • Unemployment.
    • United States. Army.
    • United States--Description and travel.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Hospitals.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Participation, British.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Economic aspects.
    Contributors:
    • Denison, William.
    • Hope, William D.
    • Paton, Andrew.
    Genre Terms:
    • Letters (correspondence)
    Contents List
       Container / Location    Title
    Box   2, Small Collections  
    William Hope letters [series]:
    Folder   24  
      August 6, 1862-September 5, 1866
    Additional Descriptive Data
    Bibliography

    Abram, W. Alexander. A Century of Independency in Blackburn. 1778-1878. Blackburn, England: J. G. and J. Toulmin, 1878.