Manuscripts Division
William L. Clements Library
University of Michigan

Finding aid for
Coleman-Stuart Family Papers, 1848-1898

Finding aid created by
Rob S. Cox, June 1996

Summary Information
Title: Coleman-Stuart family papers
Creator: Coleman family and Stuart family
Inclusive dates: 1848 July 9-1898 July 17
Extent: 29 items
Abstract:
During the mid-19th century, A. A. Coleman was a judge and well-respected planter in the black belt of west-central Alabama. W. S. Stuart, possibly a son-in-law to Coleman, was a physician, planter, and slave holder living in Monticello, Miss., southeast of Vicksburg. After the Civil War, both he and Coleman returned to farming, and Coleman may have engaged in a mercantile partnership. The Coleman-Stuart Papers consists of twenty-nine items, mostly bits of correspondence and other manuscripts of A.A. Coleman and W.S. Stuart.
Language: The material is in English
Repository: William L. Clements Library, University of Michigan
909 S. University Ave.
The University of Michigan
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1190
Phone: 734-764-2347
Web Site: www.clements.umich.edu


Access and Use
Acquisition Information:

M-2235.

Access Restrictions:

The collection is open for research.

Copyright:

Copyright status is unknown

Preferred Citation:

Coleman-Stuart Family Papers, William L. Clements Library, The University of Michigan


Biographical/Historical Note

During the mid-19th century, A. A. Coleman was a judge and well-respected planter in the black belt of west-central Alabama. Probably affiliated with the Whig Party when that party was still viable, Coleman associated himself with the Democratic Party in the late 1850s and sided with the forces of secession, serving for three years as colonel of the 40th Alabama Infantry Regiment before persistent illness forced his resignation. He saw little action due to his poor health.

W. S. Stuart, possibly a son-in-law to Coleman, was a physician, planter, and slave holder living in Monticello, Miss., southeast of Vicksburg. After the Civil War, both he and Coleman returned to farming, and Coleman may have engaged in a mercantile partnership.


Collection Scope and Content Note

The Coleman-Stuart Papers consists of twenty-nine items, mostly bits of correspondence and other manuscripts of A.A. Coleman and W.S. Stuart. The public addresses in the collection, probably written by Coleman, reflect the local prominence of the speaker, as does his Colonel's commission in the 40th Alabama Infantry.

The items in the collection span half a century, and although there is little continuity in the correspondence, many individual items are of interest. Stuart discusses crop values, arrangements for selling slaves, and the Locofocos (#2), and in the post-war period, he discusses the difficulties of adjusting to free labor in Louisiana (#23). Coleman's correspondence includes a letter written by Eli Shorter, brother of the Alabama governor, discussing state politics in 1861 (#11) and another letter asking Coleman to discharge a young soldier (#12). A letter written by E. Simpson provides a lengthy and imaginative attack on the "Black Republicans" (#7), and there are important resolutions of support for the Nashville Convention favoring the extension of slavery into the territories (#6) and what appears to be a Democratic Party address lambasting abolitionism, while supporting the Union (#8).

Subject Terms

    Subjects:
    • Alabama--History.
    • Confederate States of America. Army--Alabama Infantry Regiment, 40th (1861-1865)
    • Mississippi--History.
    • Slavery--Alabama.
    • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
    • United States--Politics and government--1848-1861.
    Contents List
    Container / Location Title
    Box   56, Small Collections Folders   17-25
    Coleman-Stuart family papers,  1848 July 9-1898 July 17 [series]
    Additional Descriptive Data
    Partial Subject Index
    Abolitionists--Alabama
    • [before 1861]
    Afro-Americans--Louisiana
    • 10 October 1877
    Alabama--History
    • passim
    Alabama--Politics and government--Civil War, 1861-1865
    • 28 March 1861
    Confederate States of America. Army--Alabama Infantry Regiment, 40th (1861-1865)
    • 27 June 1862; 23 January 1863
    Cotton--Alabama
    • 9 July 1848; 20 November 1848
    Democratic Party--Alabama
    • [before 1861]; 28 March 1861
    Education--Alabama
    • [before 1861?]
    Fourth of July orations
    • [before 1861?]
    Loco-Focos
    • 20 November 1848
    Mississippi--History
    • 9 July 1848; 20 November 1848; 5 February 1849; 30 November 1849; 13 February 1864; 23 August 1864; 26 December 1871; 7 March 1888; 23 February 1889
    Physicians--Mississippi
    • 30 March 1849; 23 January 1863
    Poetry--Alabama
    • undated
    Presidents--United States--Election--1848
    • 20 November 1848
    Presidents--United States--Election--1860
    • 30 November 1860
    Railroads--Alabama
    • 23 February 1889
    Reconstruction--Louisiana
    • 10 October 1877
    Republican Party--Alabama
    • 30 November 1860
    Secession--Alabama
    • 28 March 1861
    Sharecropping--Louisiana
    • 10 October 1877
    Shorter, John Gill, 1818-1872
    • 28 March 1861
    Slavery--Alabama
    • [after 10 June 1850]; [before 1861]
    Slavery--Mississippi
    • 5 February 1849
    Slavery--United States--Extension to the territories
    • [after 10 June 1850]
    Southern Convention (1850 : Nashville, Tenn.)
    • [after 10 June 1850]
    Sumter County (Ala.)--History
    • [after 10 June 1850]
    Temperance--Alabama
    • 31 July 1849
    United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
    • 30 November 1860; [before 1861]; [before 1861?]; 28 March 1861; 23 January 1863; 13 February 1864; 23 August 1864
    United States--Politics and government--1848-1861
    • 30 November 1860; [before 1861?]
    University of Alabama
    • undated