Robert W. McCleery papers  1862-1863
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Container / Location Title
Box   1  
Scrapbook [series]
Page   i  
  undated . Notes; s.l. (1 page)
Based on the names listed, these notes may have been part of an earlier attempt to organize the scrapbook. "Page 518-519/1. Powers,/1-E. Evertt,/1-Thomas."
Page   ii  
  1862 August 19 . Arnold J. Stall ADS to John Duncan; Warren County, Tennessee. (1 page)
Arnold J. Stall received 30 bushels of corn and 1,000 bundles of oats from John Duncan for the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry.
Page   1  
  [1862 March 15?] . Newspaper clipping; s.l. (2 pages)
Loose newspaper clipping: three panel illustration titled "MEMPHIS (TENNESSEE) BEFORE THE WAR-Sketched by Porte Crayon." Panel 1: "OLD BATTERY AT THE NAVY-YARD." Panel 2: "STEAMBOAT LANDING." Panel 3: "THE COTTON LEVEE." Verso: map of Virginia that includes parts of Maryland and North Carolina, a portion of the Chesapeake Bay, railroad routes, and towns.
Page   2  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l.
Typed transcription of notes on page 3 [regarding the Asbury University illustration].
Page   3  
  [after 1879?] . Engraving; s.l. (1 page)
Cut-out illustration of the Asbury University Building, with a manuscript note, apparently in the hand of Willam Bosson: The "Foundation" of Asbury University was laid in 1839 and burned along with the museum and library on February 10th, 1879. These buildings were rebuilt the same year along with a new Eastern wing.
Page   3  
  1864-1867 . 10 Partially printed passes; s.l. (1 page)
Ten railroad passes from 1864-1867, granting Senator William Bosson (1806-1887) passage in Nashville, Mississippi, Memphis, Ohio, and Tennessee.
Page   5  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of railroad passes on page 3.
Pages   7-8  
  1788 May 15 . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Typed transcription of the commission of William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) as "Junior Second Lieutenant of a Company of Artillery, in the first Battalion & in the First Division of the Militia in this Commonwealth comprehending the County of Suffolk." According to the transcription, the original manuscript was dated May 15, 1788 and was sent by John Avery in his capacity as jun[ior] Secretary on behalf of John Hancock, governor of Massachusetts. [Original manuscript not present.]
Page   8  
  1870 May 17 . E[dmund] W[illiam] Cole ALS to Rail Road Officer; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter of introduction for "Hon William Bosson" (1806-1887) as a principal director for the Nashville and Chattanooga and Nashville and Northwestern Railways. Cole requests that the railroad officer "pass him" and permit Bosson to continue on his way west. Promises that the courtesy will be reciprocated when the opportunity arises.
Page   9  
  1789 April 8 . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the commission of William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) as First Lieutenant. According to the transcription, the original manuscript was dated April 8, 1789, and was sent by jun[ior] sec[re]t[ary] John Avery on behalf of John Hancock, Governor of Massachusetts. [Original manuscript not present.]
Page   10  
  undated . R[obert] N[ewland] B[osson] Typed mss.; s.l. (1 page)
Two notes from Robert Bosson: correction to the transcription on page 9; he has preserved his great-grandfather's commissions by framing them in glass.
Pages   11-12  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 12. The final two lines of transcription are on page 12.
Page   12  
  undated . [William Bosson?] ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Manuscript transcription, apparently by William Bosson (1806-1887), from an original by his father William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824). Short narrative of Thomas Hickey's attempt to capture and deliver General George Washington to General William Howe, and Hickey's hanging. "This occurrence did not seem to disturb the Gen'l. I was with him the next day."
Page   12  
  undated . R[obert] N[ewland] B[osson] Typed ms.; s.l. (1 page)
Typed note by Robert Newland Bosson stating that Major William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) received his captaincy on October 28, 1790. "I do not make a transcript as this commission is practically the same as the one on the following page."
Page   14  
  1790 October 29 . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed copy of the commission of William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) as "Major of the First Regiment in the First Brigade First Division of the Militia of this Commonwealth." According to the transcription, the commission was dated October 29, 1790, and was sent by John Avery, sec[retary], on behalf of Increase Sumner, Governor and Commander in Chief of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. [Original manuscript not present.]
Page   16  
  undated . [William Bosson?] ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Manuscript transcription, apparently by William Bosson (1806-1887) from an original by his father William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824). Brief biographical sketch of General Joseph Warren "from the Manuscript of his townsman Major William Bosson."
Page   17  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 16.
Page   18  
  1807 August 5 . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of a letter accepting Major William Bosson's (1753-1823 or 1824) request to be "honorably discharged" from his position as Major "in the first Brigade and first Division of the Militia of this Commonwealth." According to the transcription, the letter was dated August 25, 1807, and was sent by the Adjutant General in Massachusetts on behalf of the Governor and Commander in Chief. [Original manuscript not present.]
Pages   19-20  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 21.
Page   21  
  undated . W[illiam] Bosson ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Manuscript transcription, apparently by William Bosson (1806-1887) from an original by his father William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824). The Declaration of Independence arrived in New York for General Washington to read to the Army. Description of the parade held by the Army "to signify acceptance." Procession, celebration, and removal of King George-related paraphernalia and imagery in New York. Removal of a monument made of lead in Bowling Green; removal of the King's Arms from St. Paul's Church. Concluding note highlights the death toll of Independence to "citizens."
Pages   23-24  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 25.
Page   25  
  undated . W[illiam] Bosson ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Manuscript transcription, apparently by William Bosson (1806-1887) from an original by his father William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824). Brief biographical sketch of General Henry Knox's life, with special attention given to his marriage to Lucy Flucker. William Bosson (1806-1887) added a note, which states that his father was a personal acquaintance of Knox because they lived close to one another and belonged to the same artillery service during the "great struggle for freedom."
Page   26  
  1789 May 25 . Thomas May[o] Partially printed DS to William Bosson; [Roxbury, Massachusetts]. (1 page)
Legal document obligating William Bosson's (1753-1823 or 1824) brother-in-law Thomas Mayo to pay him 38 pounds, four shillings, and five pence by the first of January 1790. Witnessed by Sam[ue]l Quincy and John Davis. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) states that his father married Prudence Mayo and, following her death, her sister Susannah Mayo. He further remarks that the money referred to in the legal document was Susannah Mayo's inheritance from her father's estate.
Page   26  
  1819 December 24 . J[ohn] C[aldwell] Calhoun ALS to Ethan A[llen] Brown; Department of War. (1 page)
Pages   27-28  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Typed transcription of the manuscript and contextual notes on page 26.
Page   29  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter and note on page 26 (duplicate transcription).
Page   30  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the Mayo Bosson letter on page 31.
Page   31  
  1826 August 5 . Tho[ma]s [Mayo Bosson] ALS to William [Bosson]; [Cincinnati, Ohio]. (2 pages)
Would like William to seek out and visit the family of Colonel or Major Fanning, Harriet and Caroline Fanning, Samuel Abbot, "friend Fox," and others. Thomas Mayo would like William to have the Foxes send him "the Chines coppy" presented to him by Abraham "as a relic, of a friendship I shall never cease to cherish." Advises William to treat the people he meets with "the strictest propriety," "put on an air of confiding, free and friendly interest, as though you was at home, do not exhibit in your conduct a shade of vanity, arrogance, or indifference, even in retaliation, it will only provoke an increase of bad feeling, without being of the slightest advantage..." In a manuscript note, William Bosson (1806-1887) explains that his brother Thomas Mayo Bosson (1785-1850) sent him the letter on the occasion of his first visit to Roxbury, Massachusetts, since birth.
Page   31  
  1863 June 21 . R. S. Thorn ALS to [William] Bosson; Head-Quarters, Department of the Cumberland, Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (1 page)
Extends the compliments of [William] Rosecrans; the General would like Bosson to meet him at head quarters in the evening. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) states that he went to the headquarters and found the army generals there discussing an impending attack on General Braggs Rebel Army at Nashville. Followed by an additional note about the Tullahoma campaign.
Page   33  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the Thorn letter on page 31.
Page   34  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the orders on page 35.
Page   35  
  undated . Newspaper clipping; s.l. (1 page)
Article from an unidentified newspaper, presenting resolutions adopted at the May 2nd meeting of the Maryland Union party. Hon. Andrew Johnson was in attendance from Tennessee. Manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) at the top of the page "Meetings of Union Men in Maryland and Alabama."
Page   35  
  1863 July 28 and   1863 July 29 . W[illiam] Bosson ANS and document to Gordon Grange; Murfreesboro, Tennessee, Nashville, Tennessee. (2 pages)
Recto: William Bosson (1806-1887) ANS request to Gordon Grange for a railway pass for his brother, who is returning home to McMinnville. Verso: Gordon Grange document (in the hand of William Avery), railroad pass for Bosson's brother (good for 5 days).
Page   35  
  1863 July 26 . H. G. Thrall DS; Headquarters of the Department of Cumberland, Winchester, Tennessee. (1 page)
Extract from Special Field Order no. 204, appointing William Bosson (1806-1887) and Jordan Stokes members of the Board of Claims. On Headquarters, Department of the Cumberland stationery. A manuscript note by William Bosson states that the Board of Claims was comprised of three Army officers in Nashville.
Page   36  
  [1885?] . Newspaper clipping; s.l. (1 page)
Newspaper clipping from an unidentified paper: "Rebelion [sic.] What it Cost to the National Government in Money." The newspaper article lists various costs related to "WHAT IT COST to prosecute the war for the Union..." The article notes that the "$97,000 for the capture of Jeff Davis is just a bit staggering. He is about the most costly captive the government ever got hold of." A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) highlights the overall growing costs of the war, remarking that leaders from the Confederate party now assume prominent positions in the United States government."
Page   36  
  1863 April 22 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to Commanding Officer, Louisville Kentucky; Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter of introduction to the commanding officer at Louisville, Kentucky, for William Bosson (1806-1887), who is bringing supplies for the Army and Hospitals.
Page   37  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the newspaper article on page 35.
Page   38  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription for the manuscripts on pages 35 and 36.
Page   39  
  undated . R[obert] N[ewland] B[osson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Partial typed transcription of the newspaper article on page 36. A typed note by Robert Newland Bosson indicates that he did not transcribe the complete newspaper article because it was too long for the page and "not of sufficient interest to warrant the labor and space."
Page   40  
  [after 1879 November 17] . W[illiam] Bosson, Printed impression; s.l. (1 page)
"Impress of a Gold Medal," with information about General Thomas' career between 1860-1862 and his appointment to Major General of the Army in 1865. William Bosson (1806-1887) added penciled in notes after 1879 below the timeline of Thomas' career and around the imprint of the gold medal. Bosson wrote that the medal was presented to Thomas in Nashville. "Gen. Thomas was appointed Commissioned as Maj. General in the army of U.S. after the Battle of Nashville, Jan'y 5 1865." Bosson also stated that "Equestrian Statue" of the General was erected on November 17, 1879.
Page   40  
  1864 July 28 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Near Atlanta, Georgia. (3 pages)
Letter 3 of 3, page 40: Thomas responds to a prior communication with William Bosson (1806-1887) about cotton. Suggests that the cotton is out of his jurisdiction. Thomas forwarded the issue to General Sherman who informed him that the issue should be passed along to the Treasury Agents and Treasury Department. Mentions an investigation of "Miss McElavine's claims for damages." Sent her a copy of records produced on 1862 and 1863 by a board. Provides Bosson with an update on progress "crowding the rebels" at Atlanta.
Page   40  
  1864 February 18 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to William Bosson; Headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Murfreesboro Tennessee. (3 pages)
Letter 2 of 3, page 40: George H. Thomas received William Bosson's list of "negroes (contraband)" in and around Murfreesboro. Adjutant General S. Thomas stopped [at Chattanooga?] on his way to Knoxville "for the purpose of organizing Contraband Camps and enlisting colored troops." The Adjutant General kept the list made by Bosson and suggested he would ensure "no future trouble with the negroes." George H. Thomas expected that the plans would also be implemented in Mississippi and Louisiana. Would like Bosson's input on the "well being of the negroes."
Page   40  
  1864 January 7 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; Headquarters Department of the Cumberland, Chattanooga, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter 1 of 3, page 40: Invitation for Bosson to visit. Interested in talking to him about the "affairs of the times." Manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887): Letter sent to William at Murfreesboro, T. after the battle of Missionary Ridge near Chattanooga. Bosson wrote that he stayed in Chattanooga for three days.
Page   40  
  undated . R[obert] N[ewland] B[osson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of letters 2 and 3 on page 40.
Page   41  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter 1 on page 40 and typed transcription of a manuscript by W. Bosson detailing information about General Thomas's military accomplishments between 1860 and 1865.
Page   42  
  1866 March 5 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Louisville, Kentucky. (2 page)
Letter 1 of 3, page 42: General Hibbard suggested that the charter for the East Tennessee Marble Company would pass the upcoming Legislature session. Encourages William Bosson (1806-1887) to do something with the notes Bosson collected on the ancient mounds in Tennessee. The research might have potential for archaeologists interested in connecting "Mound builders of America" to "ancient inhabitants of the European Continent." Thomas indicates he can connect Bosson to the Irving Institute.
Page   42  
  1866 November 29 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Louisville, Kentucky. (6 pages)
Letter 2 of 3, page 42: Responding to a letter from Bosson about the conditions on Rock Island. Thomas writes that the situation is not unique to the Confederate states and that the conditions of people could change if they were more open to a unified government. In part: "In reflecting on the present unhappy condition of these people and considering the manner in which it was brought on one is almost forced to the conclusion that they are cursed and doomed to destruction. No matter what line of policy is adopted or terms offered they reject them with scorn and madly persist in keeping alive their hatred of the Government, hoping against hope or common sense that they may yet succeed. It is truly distressing to behold a people so maddened and reckless. With inevitable utter ruin and dissolution before them, if they persist in their mad policy, they cannot, or will not understand that leniency on the part of the Government is not induced by hear of their ultimate success in establishing a separate Government." Thomas believes that Kentucky is worse off than Tennessee. He remarks that Kentuckians consider themselves to be part of the Union while simultaneously abiding by their own rules. Abolishing slavery in their eyes is unconstitutional. Union veterans and rebel veterans are treated differently in Kentucky's legal system; Union citizens can sue Union soldiers for "depredations" but they cannot sue a "Rebel and Guerilla." Thomas states that Kentucky's loyalty to rebels is driven by "Public opinion and the desire to make money." Expresses little hope for the people of the South to "return to a condition of loyalty and peace." He anticipates that "ruin and dissolution" will ultimately "overtake and destroy them." Unless society can engage in "repeopling" Tennessee "with an industrious & peaceable class of people" it will consume itself. Laments the loss of potential in terms of "natural resources" and growth. Remarks on a letter he received from Mr. A. Nelson of Nashville, addressing his and Bosson's interest in "settling Tennessee." Asks for continued support from Bosson to further promote this plan and bring it to fruition. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) heads the letter: "Maj Geo H. Thomas a patriotic letter"
Page   42  
  1867 February 3 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Washington, D.C. (4 pages)
Letter 3 of 3, page 42: Writes to Bosson about a coal mine in Crow Creek Valley asking for aid. Optimistic about profitability and ability to get the mine running. Believes all of the previous owners of the mine, formerly known as Anderson Mining and Manufacturing Company, have died except for John F. Anderson. Discusses wanting to amend Section 12 to reflect the new commissioners. Also writes about wanting to amend Section 17 to reflect that their mine will receive state aid for building railroads in the way the Jasper branch of the Nashville and Chattanooga Rail Road does. If the amendment passes, Thomas and the other commissions "can immediately commence operations with a fair prospect of returning to the state treasury any money or means which may have been advanced us within one or two years." Discusses newspaper rumblings of the potential impeachment of Andrew Johnson, led by congress. Believes that Congress will quell the rebels. Writes that he does not believe this is being seriously considered. Thomas does anticipate that congress will pass "measures" that will "show the late Rebels where they stand and what they May expect." He also anticipates that plans will be proposed to protect Union loyalists in the South and ease the transition of Rebels in Southern States to submission "with a good grace to the authority of the Government." Manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887): "From Gen GH Thomas, See 3d. Page."
Page   42  
  undated . W[illiam] Bosson Ms.; s.l. (1 page)
Anecdote by William Bosson (1806-1887) about seeking refuge with Major General G. H. Thomas in McMinnville, Tennessee, when he was "escaping beyond the reach of arrest by the rebel authorities." Major General D. C. Buell led the Army Corps with General Thomas as his second in command. They oversaw the left wing and first Division of the Army of Ohio. The right wing was at Deckard. General D.C. Buell's military decisions leading to the Battle of Perryville, October 8, 1862. Conversation with General Thomas asking him why he declined to accept an assignment as commander of the Army of Ohio on September 29, 1862. General Thomas told him he declined to lead the army because the army was "somewhat demoralized" after its long journey from Tennessee to Kentucky and a change in leadership would not have a bearing on the outcome of the army's work "protecting Louisville & Cincinnati & driving the Confederates from Kentucky." Bosson describes this act as "characteristic of the true Patriot who would risque nothing to gratify his personal ambition as a soldier." [Note: Transcription on page 45].
Page   42  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of two letters on page 42. The second letter is not completely transcribed and continues on page 43.
Page   43  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the end of letter 2 and the entirety of letter 3 on page 42. Typed note by Robert Newland Bosson: Thomas was wrong about Andrew Johnson's impeachment.
Page   45  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of William Bosson's anecdote on page 42.
Page   46  
  1870 April 4 . John Trimble, Eugene Carey, J. W. Paramore, Enose Hopkins, G. S. Carpenter LS to William Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter with an enclosed "circular calling a meeting" in Nashville commemorating Thomas. Letter conveys that William Bosson (1806-1887) as well as friends in Tennessee are invited to honor him in the capital. The committee also invites Bosson to deliver an address.
Page   46  
  1868 March 12 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Louisville, Kentucky. (2 pages)
Letter 3 of 3, page 46: William Bosson (1806-1887) presumably wrote George Henry Thomas a letter about a Murfreesboro riot and the spread of the "the Secret Society of the Ku Klux." Thomas is not authorized to aid civil authorities with troops. He assures Bosson that Bosson's letters and those of others in Tennessee about the conduct of the Ku Klux have been sent to the "General Command of the Army." Thomas writes that he will act if he is instructed to by the General.
Page   46  
  1867 July 8 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Headquarters of the Department of the Cumberland, Louisville, Kentucky. (3 pages)
Letter 2 of 3, page 46: Writes to William Bosson (1806-1887) that he has enclosed a certificate of claim for Miss McElvaine regarding "occupation of her property, as well as to her loyalty." Thomas expresses hope that Unionism and the laws of Congress that follow the "reconstruction of the Southern States" will "prevail" and take hold in Tennessee. Closes, noting to Bosson that he looks forward to having him visit.
Page   46  
  1867 March 1 . Geo[rge] H[enry] Thomas ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Louisville, Kentucky. (4 pages)
Letter 1 of 3, page 46: Writes William Bosson (1806-1887) in Tennessee, answering Bosson's questions about the coal mine Thomas acquired in Nashville. Thomas expresses satisfaction with the quality and proximity of the Nashville coal over coal produced in Sewanee. Thomas explains that building a railroad track to the nearest Nashville and Chattanooga R.R. track (a few miles) or to Stevenson, Alabama (10 miles) will be the next step to allowing the coal to reach the market. Thomas expresses preference for building to Stevenson as it will allow for independence from Nashville and Chattanooga R.R. and M & C. [NB: Appears to be either requesting aid from the state or from Bosson on behalf of the state to build a railroad route and to be placed on the "same footing" as other mines in the state, which would mean being able to ship coal on any state railroad with "the terms that are granted the most favored mines." He argues that this will allow for future benefits as his company will be able to quickly accumulate the money they borrow from the State to build the railroads.] Tells Bosson he doesn't have any aspirations for Presidency, as he considers himself underqualified given his lack of experience with State "affairs," but he appreciates the high regard for his army experience that led to the suggestion. Mentions that this is the first time he has been asked about the situation and asks that Bosson convey his feelings on his behalf to Tennessee citizens: "As you have afforded me the first opportunity, that I have received from any source, to express my sentiments on the subject, I avail myself of it, and not only authorize, but desire you to make them knows to the Citizens of Tennessee at least."
Page   46  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of letters 1 and 2 on page 46.
Pages   46-47  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of letters on page 46.
Page   48  
  undated . 5 Newspaper clippings; s.l. (1 page)
Titles: "Collection of customs at the South," "Postal Arrangements at the South" and "Vote on the African Slave Trade," "The Southern Army" and "Treason defined in Florida," "Expenses of the 'Confederate States'," and "Montgomery, Alabama, March 9, 1861. 'To the President of the Convention of Arkansas.'" Manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887): "Clippings from Southern Papers."
Page   48  
  1870 March 31 . Geo W. Steele, Jno. E. Hudson, Frank Hyberger, John Hugh Smith, J. M. Thatcher, and Sam J. Little Printed circular letter to "the Soldiers and Officers of the Army of the Union, and the friends and admirers of Maj.-Gen. George H. Thomas; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Notification of George H. Thomas' death and invitation for recipients to attend a meeting commemorating Thomas in Nashville on April 12, 1870. [NB: this is probably the circular that was enclosed with the letter sent to Bosson on April 4, 1870, by John Trimble, Eugene Carey, J. W. Paramore, Enose Hopkins, and G. S. Carpenter, located on page 46.]
Page   48  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the circular letter on page 48.
Page   49  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed note respecting the newspaper clippings on page 48.
Page   50  
  1865-1866 . S. C. Mercer, 3 partially printed tickets to W[illia]m Bosson; Philadelphia and Tennessee. (3 pages (total))
1. Ticket to the "Union Convention of The State of Tennessee," [before January 8, 1865]. Accompanied by a manuscript explanatory note by William Bosson (1806-1887). 2. Ticket for Bosson as a delegate from Tennessee to the "Southern Loyalists Convention" in Philadelphia. Signed by S. C. Mercer, secretary of the Union State Convention, [before September 3, 1866]. 3. Ticket for Bosson as a delegate to the "Southern Loyal Convention" in Philadelphia, September 1866.
Page   50  
  1861 May . 2 Newspaper clippings; s.l. (1 page)
Titles: "Military League between the State of Tennessee and the Confederate States" and "Declaration of Independence of Tennessee." With a post-1878 manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) highlighting the relationship between the State and the Federal Union, leaving Tennessee "free from all obligation to, or connection with the Federal Government." Bosson writes that Isham G. Harris "Governor & Traitor" is a senator in Congress. Washington C. Whitthorne is, in 1878 a member of Congress.
Page   50  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed note respecting the newspaper clippings on page 50.
Page   51  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of tickets on page 50.
Page   52  
  [after 1876] . W[illia]m Bosson Ms.; s.l. (2 pages)
Manuscript by William Bosson (1806-1887) on the restoration of civil government in Tennessee following the Civil War. Bosson was on a reporting committee with Judge Milligan, Judge Gault, Maynard, E. H. Cooper, and John Hord. Andrew Johnson and a popular vote approved the report, which included an amendment to the state constitution abolishing slavery "with a schedule." "I was elected to the Senate for the 9th district & was appointed Chairman of the Com. of ways & Means, Chairman of the Com. on Education & Common Schools, & Chairman on Freedmen Com." In the financial realm, Bosson introduced a bill "designed by its provisions to sustain the faith & credit of the State." This involved "funding the interest" accrued over 4.5 years and paying the interest due July 1, 1866. Writes about the changes in value of Tennessee state's bonds between 1870 and 1877. The Democratic leadership in 1870 failed to pay interest, resulting in a significant decline in the worth of Tennessee's bonds. Suggests this decision embarrassed the "growth & prosperity" of the State. Refers to document signed by Brownlow, Hatchell, Radford, and Fletcher that "authorized and empowered" William Bosson (1806-1887) by the Executive and Finance Officers of Tennessee to select a Bank in New York for the state due July 1, 1866.
Pages   52-53  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 52.
Page   54  
  1865 October 9 . Edward Maynard, et al. Printed circular letter to W[illia]m Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Invitation for William Bosson (1806-1887) to attend a "convention" in the Senate Chamber on August 25, 1865. Signed by Edward Maynard, secretary.
Page   54  
  1866 June 5 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow, et al. LS to William Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter of introduction stating that William Bosson (1806-1887) is authorized to travel to New York and select a bank for the state of Tennessee, for paying the upcoming July interest. On "State of Tennessee, Executive Department" illustrated stationery.
Page   54  
  1868 May 22 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Executive Office, Knoxville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Designates William Bosson (1806-1887) as Brownlow's proxy to represent him "in the Board of Finance in all matters relating to the interests of the State," should Brownlow be absent.
Page   54  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letters on page 54.
Page   55  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the invitation on page 54.
Page   56  
  [1867] . 2 printed clippings; s.l. (1 page)
Manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) identifies these items as two "slips" of text from a report of Judge Samuel Watson. President of the State Bank of Tennessee and President of State Financial Board."
Page   56  
  1867 December 4 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ANS to "Louisville Committee;" State of Tennessee, Executive Department, Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
William Bosson (1806-1887) will represent Brownlow, should the Louisville Committee wish to "negotiate with the State authorities" about the Clarksville Railroad. "Himself and I fully agree, and understand each others views." Brownlow adds: "I will fully endorse whatever he May do in the premises."
Page   56  
  [1868 May ?] . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow, S. J. Fletcher, and Jas. Plunkett DS fragment; s.l. (1 page)
William Bosson (1806-1887) will represent Brownlow in negotiations with authorities respecting a scrip from the "General Government." Gives Bosson power of attorney. A manuscript note by Bosson relates that this power of attorney was given to him "to act in his place on a commission appointed by Legislature to sell land scrip, which was sold 300,000 Acres to Mr. Lewis highest bidder at 90 60/100 cts per Acre."
Page   56  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of the manuscripts on page 56.
Page   57  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the printed clippings and note on page 56.
Page   58  
  1867 January 14 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; State of Tennessee, Executive Department, Knoxville, Tennessee. ( 1 page)
Tells William Bosson (1806-1887) that he will come to Nashville when William has established and begun working with a quorum. Mentions that Stokes has requested that Brownlow "bring on the Congressional election." Brownlow lists the five reasons why he has declined to call an election. Tells Bosson to show the letter to "Mercer, and oblige, &c." On "State of Tennessee, Executive Department" illustrated stationery.
Page   58  
  1866 June 23 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ALS to [William] Bosson; Knoxville, Tennessee. (1 page)
States that Bosson has probably seen his proclamation "convening the Legislature the 4th of July " which will be followed by a quorum in both houses. Brownlow anticipates that "The whole Johnson-Rebel-Conservative-Traitor influence" will make it difficult to pass "our amendments in the House." Talks about Johnson's "patronage" of "Rebels and Copperheads . . . in this end of the State." Brownlow requested aid from Fowler and Stokes, to help "make a vigorous effort." "It will not do to fail and yet there is danger of failure."
Page   58  
  1867 January 9 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; State of Tennessee, Executive Department, Knoxville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Brownlow is heartened by William Bosson's (1803-188) letter about the financial "state of things." "The trouble is a want of competency at home, and a little of that zeal we manifest in speculating, to sustain the credit of the State. You will understand me." Wishes the First National would have "stepped forward to our relief, as it would have given us an excuse to change our place of deposit." On "State of Tennessee, Executive Department" illustrated stationery.
Page   58  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of the two letters (June 23, 1866, and January 9, 1867) on page 58.
Page   59  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter (January 14, 1867) on page 58.
Page   60  
  [1868-1869?] . 3 newspaper clippings; s.l. (1 page)
Manuscript note by William Bosson: "State Teachers Assn held at the Capitol Nashville Tenn. House of Representatives Nov 3 1869." Newspaper clipping titles: "Of the State Teachers' Association of Tennessee held at Memphis December 30 and 31, 1868" "Semi-Annual Meeting State Teachers' Association," and "Minutes of the State Teacher's Association."
Page   60  
  1868 March 21 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; State of Tennessee, Executive Department, Knoxville, Tennessee. (2 pages)
The Legislature did not pass the bill "authorizing us to dispose of these railroads." Brownlow agrees that the Financial Board should meet and prepare to settle the impending interests due in May and July. Awareness of intent to speculate State Bonds through the "issuance of small 8 percent bonds of the denomination of 50 and 100 dollars." He is aware that such a "scheme" would favor two Members of the board, "I will not vote for it nor counsel it in any way." "It strikes me that the Board should provide for the debt that falls due in May and the July interest, and then stop, awaiting the reassembling of the Legislature in November ." The Ku Klux Klan is "getting to be a very formidable organization in every part of the State." Middle and West Tennessee have been asking for help from the state militia "almost every day." If Johnson is impeached, he recommends Bosson to appeal for help from Grant via General Thomas in the form of "sufficient force to break up these murderers." On "State of Tennessee, Executive Department" illustrated stationery.
Page   60  
  [1868?] March 2 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Executive Office, Knoxville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Agrees with Bosson about the "four (4) Railroads;" "They ought to be sold by special act of the legislature." Faces opposition, on account of "the late Senatorial election, together with the election of Speaker of the Senate and the failure of some members to get from me everything they demanded for themselves and friends to the utter ignoring of the claims upon the party of all others has gotten up a faction against me in each House who seem inclined to oppose anything I recommend, not caring whether it is right or wrong." States that many people both inside and outside of the Legislature will want Railroad positions. Brownlow "would rejoice to see these defaulting roads sold out to the highest bidder." On "Executive Office" illustrated stationery.
Page   60  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Transcriptions for the letters on page 60.
Page   61  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed note respecting the newspaper clippings on page 60. As the articles are legible, R. N. Bosson decided not to transcribe them.
Page   62  
  undated . J. B. Lindsley ANS to [William] Bosson; [Tennessee]. (1 page)
Requesting that the Senate Committee on Education meet with the Board of Officers. In an accompanying manuscript note, Bosson writes that Lindsley was president of the Executive Committee, Teachers' State Association until William Bosson (1806-1887) was elected to the position. Bosson writes that Lindsley was president of Nashville University and a professor of chemistry in the Medical College of Nashville. "He was a man of great zeal & laboured earnestly in the educational work." Bosson notes that letters on the opposite page refer to "the effort to organize a System of Common Schools" and "a meeting of the Board of Trustees of E. T. University of which I was a Member."
Page   62  
  1867 November 12 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow Ms. speech to W[illia]m Bosson; State of Tennessee, Executive Department, Nashville Tennessee. (4 pages)
Manuscript speech by Brownlow, prepared for the Tennessee Teacher's State Association. Brownlow addressed the speech to Bosson, intending that he deliver it on his behalf (on account of the condition of Brownlow's voice). On the reconstruction of Tennessee, with an emphasis on the importance of training children. The education of children is a social service and cost that will eventually benefit everyone in terms of reduced crime and more domestic product. Conveys the importance of spreading values about "public virtue and good" and participating in shaping the culture of Tennessee. "We can afford to be indifferent to no child, however humbly born. His brains are not measured by the poverty of his father's purse. He will grow up either to produce public virtue and wealth or to destroy them. If he is not trained in your schools, he will be trained elsewhere and be specially likely to tax the state for his trial in the courts and his punishment in the prison." "We must not expect our schools to be better than our teachers. And their quickening and shaping of the minds of our youth must determine the character of our citizens for the observance of law and the production of wealth in the various pursuits of life."
Page   62  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the speech on page 62.
Page   63  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of the letter and note on page 62.
Page   64  
  1862, 1864 . Currency; s.l. (2 notes (currency))
Confederate Stamp [not present]; Confederate currency: Richmond 10 dollar note, dated February 17, 1864, Richmond 1 dollar note, dated June 2, 1862.
Page   64  
  [18]63 April 17 . J[ohn] H[unt] Morgan ADS; McMinnville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Grants bearer passage to Burk[e]sville, [Kentucky?]. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) explains that "Rebel Genl" Morgan gave the pass to Bosson's wife at the Falls of Caney Fork, White County, Tennessee. She used the pass to go through Rebel lines to Federal-occupied Carthage, Tennessee. Federal Troops then sent her on a Steamer to Nashville. They had been separated for "near Eleven months."
Page   64  
  1866 January 29 . Horace Maynard ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; Washington. (4 pages)
Letter 1 of 4, page 64: Maynard writes William Bosson (1806-1887) on the negative response to a free school bill; Bosson must be disheartened. Offers recommendations for funding the establishment of schools and selecting a superintendent of instruction.
Page   64  
  1866 November 19 . Tho[ma]s W[illiam] Humes ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Knoxville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter 3 of 4, page 64: Humes regrets that they could not meet during his time in Nashville to talk about "the subject of the Education of the people of the State" and to express "to you my hearty sympathy in your earnest & faithful efforts in the Legislature, to promote this good work."
Page   64  
  1869 January 21 . Charles D. McGuffey ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Office Superintendent of Public Instruction for Anderson County, Clinton, Tennessee. (2 pages)
Letter 2 of 4, page 64: McGuffey requests that William Bosson (1806-1887) address the East Tennessee Teachers Association in Knoxville "in connection with" the Knox County Teachers' Institute on February 9th. Requests information regarding subject and preferred date of the address for the program. Expresses hopes that Bosson will attend. Praises Bosson's work in the establishment of the Free School.
Page   64  
  1869 January 27 . Tho[ma]s W[illiam] Humes ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; Knoxville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter 4 of 4, page 64: The board of trustees has accepted the appointment of William Bosson (1806-1887) as a Trustee of East Tennessee University. Request for Bosson to come to a meeting on the 10th of February "and give us the benefit of your valuable counsel and aid in initiating the important work which we are called upon to perform." Educational meetings will also be held in Knoxville around that time.
Page   64  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letters 2, 3, and 4 on page 64.
Page   65  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the pass and note on page 64, with a remark about the absent Confederate stamp: "This was stolen when I foolishly let my grandfather's book out of my possession for a short while. With it was taken a seal from one of my grandfather's commissions in the Massachusetts militia after the Revolutionary War."
Page   66  
  1865 November 17 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlaw, A[ndrew] J[ackson] Fletcher DS (official copy) to William Bosson; State of Tennessee, Executive Department, Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Appointment of Bosson as Director of the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad Company. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) regards the transition of the Nashville and Chattooga R.R. from the Federal authorities that held it from March 1862-September 15, 1865, to "the Corporation." The state held 1,800,00 interest. Bosson represented the company from 1865 to March 1872. On "State of Tennessee, Executive Department" stationery.
Page   66  
  1864 . Money; s.l. (1 bill)
Confederate currency: Richmond 10 dollar note, dated February 17, 1864.
Page   66  
  1868 September 12 . John Eaton ALS; State of Tennessee, Office Superintendent Public Instruction, Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Letter of introduction for Bosson from John Eaton, Jr., Superintendent Public Instruction. Eaton tells the reader or "educational gentlemen" that Bosson is a "gentlemen of extended observation & information, foremost among the most active in good works in our State, prominent in the reorganization of the Government, and especially distinguished among us as the Chairman of the Legislative Committee on Education & the father of the free school system now being organized here..." With a manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) on the career of John Eaton, Jr.
Page   66  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter on page 66.
Page   67  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter on page 66.
Page   68  
  1868 January 21 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow, A[ndrew] J[ackson] Fletcher DS (official copy) to William Bosson; [Tennessee]. . (1 page)
Appointment of William Bosson (1806-1887) as Director of the Nashville and Chattanooga Rail Road. On "State of Tennessee, To all who shall See these Presents, Greeting" form.
Page   68  
  1867 December 17 . W[illia]m G[annaway] Brownlow, A[ndrew] J[ackson] Fletcher DS (official copy) to W[illia]m Bosson; [Tennessee]. (1 page)
Appointment of William Bosson (1806-1887) as Director of the South Western Rail Road Company. With manuscript note by Bosson, stating that the Southwestern was designed to connect with Cincinnati. Bosson was the first Treasurer and second president. He held the position from 1858 to 1861. The Rebellion stopped the work and "disorganized the corporation."
Page   68  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the document (December 17, 1867) on page 68.
Page   69  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the document (January 21, 1868) on page 68.
Page   70  
  1869 August 28 . D[e]W[itt] C[linton] Senter, A. J. Fletcher DS (official copy) to William Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
William Bosson's (1806-1887) commission as representative of the 4th Congressional District of Tennessee in the Commercial Convention of the Valley of the Mississippi in Keokuk, Iowa, on September 7, 1869. On "Executive Office" illustrated stationery.
Page   70  
  1869 April 29 . D[e]W[itt] C[linton] Senter, A. J. Fletcher DS (official copy) to William Bosson; [Tennessee]. (1 page)
Appointment of William Bosson (1806-1887) as Director of the South Western Railroad Company.
Page   70  
  1867 April 4 . W[illiam] G[annaway] Brownlow, A. J. Fletcher DS (official copy) to W[illia]m Bosson; [Tennessee]. (1 page)
Appointment of William Bosson (1806-1887) as Director of the Nashville and Chattanooga Rail Road Company.
Page   70  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of documents (April 4, 1867 and April 29, 1869) on page 70.
Page   71  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the document (August 28, 1869) on page 70.
Page   72  
  1869 September 22 . Frank Hyberger ALS to William Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Transmitting William Bosson's (1806-1887) appointment to "represent the Commercial interest of the State of Tennessee in the Commercial Convention" on the 12th of October . On "Executive Office" illustrated stationery.
Page   72  
  1869 May 10 . D[e]W[itt] C[linton] Senter, Frank Hyberger DS (official copy) to W[illia]m Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Appointment of William Bosson (1806-1887) to represent the "Fourth Congressional District of this State in the Memphis Commercial Convention" on May 18, 1869, in Memphis. A manuscript note by William Bosson states that the "Commercial Convention of the Valley of the Mississippi revived the 'Southern Commercial Con.'" Several years after it was established, it became the "Nursery of the Rebellion." "In the true sense it became a political Congress congregating delegates from all the Southern States-political malcontents, fire eaters-under The Semblance of a 'Commercial Convention'. I look with suspicion on the Southern convocations." On "Executive Office" illustrated stationery.
Page   72  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the document on page 72.
Page   73  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter of introduction on page 8.
Page   73  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter on page 72.
Page   74  
  1869 October 12 . E. A. James ANS to William Bosson; [Louisville, Tennessee?]. (1 page)
William Bosson (1806-1887) has been appointed to the committee on "Improvement Mouths of the Mississippi" at the Louisville Convention.
Page   74  
  1869 August 16 . Blanton Duncan Partially printed letter to William Bosson; Louisville, Tennessee (1 page)
Invitation to the Southern Commercial Convention at Louisville on October 12, 1869. On "Southern Commercial Convention" stationery, with a birds-eye view of Louisville as its letterhead.
Page   74  
  1872 March 19 . DS (official copy); "Presidents Room," Nashville & Chattanooga R.R. Co. (3 pages)
Note page titled by William Bosson (1806-1887) "Resolutions of President and Board of Directors of the Nashville C.R.R." Official copy of resolutions from a Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad Company board of directors meeting, in which Bosson's and Hon Thos. H. Caldwell's terms as state Directors expire. Manuscript notes by William Bosson provide a summary of his service as a director. Copied and embossed by secretary W. A. Gleaves on March 30, 1872.
Page   74  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the document on page 74.
Page   75  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the note on page 74.
Page   76  
  1852 November 20 . Edward Everett ALS to Char[les] T. Bosson; Washington, D.C. (2 pages)
Tells Charles he sent him six copies of Gilman's poem and will not charge him for printing. Everett will be succeeding Daniel Webster per the president's request: "The President requested me, the day after Mr. W's decease, to take his place: no one can fill it." A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) states that the position in question is that of Secretary of State of the United States.
Page   76  
  1864 December 10 . Edward Everett ALS to W[illia]m Bosson; Boston, Massachusetts. (3 pages)
To William Bosson (1806-1887) on death of Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864). Expresses affection for Charles and praises his Christianly gentleman behavior. Informs William that he wrote a paragraph for the Daily Advertiser about Charles's death, buts that he didn't know enough details to provide a "detailed notice." Mentions being satisfied knowing that Charles was able to enjoy a pamphlet he had sent.
Page   76  
  [1864] . Newspaper clipping; s.l. (1 page)
Newspaper obituary of Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864), possibly the Daily Advertiser piece referred to by Everett in his letter of November 20, 1852. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) states that William's brother Charles Thompson Bosson (1791-1864) graduated from Harvard with Everett in 1811.
Page   76  
  [ca. 1863] . Printed map; s.l. (1 page)
"Sketch of the Vicinity of the Falls of Caney Fork of Cumberland River Ten. Constructed from information received of W. Bosson Esq." under the direction of topographical engineer Capt. N[athaniel] Michler, by Major John E. Weyss, Kentucky volunteers. Original map dated April 1863. [NB: Bosson property is present on the map.]
Page   76  
  undated . Photographs; s.l. (3 items)
Three albumin print photographs of "Falls of the Caney Fork of the Cumberland." With a manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887): "Our Home at the breaking out of the Rebellion."
Page   76  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of the map title and manuscript note on page 76.
Page   77  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of Edward Everett's letters (December 10, 1864, and November 20, 1852) on page 76.
Page   78  
  1866 September 4 . Pennsylvania State Equal Rights League LS and printed invitation to W[illia]m Bosson; Philadelphia, [Pennsylvania]. (1 page)
Invitation for William Bosson (1806-1887) to address the Equal Rights League at the Wesley AME Zion Church on Thursday Evening September 6, 1866, on a "political question of such vital importance to them." Signed by members of the League. With enclosed printed invitation to private entertainments at the League House on the day before the meeting. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) explains that he was a delegate to "A Southern Loyal Convention" that convened on September 2, 1866 and remarks on the positive effect of such meetings on state elections.
Page   78  
  1866 July 25 . R[ichard] W. Johnson ALS to [William Bosson]; Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (1 page)
Johnson lent a railroad train to General VanCleve that William Bosson (1806-1887) requested and so cannot accommodate Bosson's request. He authorizes Bosson to call on VanCleve "for all the ambulances he can spare." A manuscript note by William Bosson explains that he requested the railroad train "on the occasion of a Sabbath School picnic" and that the event was ultimately supplied with 12 ambulances. One of them had a large United States flag on it: "The display was by no means agreeable to the rebel population." On "Head Quarters District of Middle Tennessee" stationery.
Page   78  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter (July 25, 1866) on page 78.
Page   79  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter (September 4, 1866) and printed invitation on page 78.
Page   80  
  1865 May . 2 Tickets; s.l. (1 page)
William Bosson's ticket for the National Union Republican Convention in Chicago on May 20, 1868, signed by Marcus J. Ward. With one ticket for Admission to the "family circle" of the Republican National Convention May 1868 signed by W. M. Smith. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) includes details about his committee work.
Page   80  
  1865 November 5 . Charles P. Bosson ALS to William Bosson; Boston, Massachusetts. (4 pages)
He is happy to hear that William Bosson (1806-1887) is alive; hadn't heard anything from the Tennessee side of the family until Charles Thompson Bosson's obituary by Edward Everett appeared in the Boston Daily Advertiser. Everett also posted Bosson's death notice in the Necrology of Harvard 1864-5. Honors William Bosson's role in "connection with regenerated Tennessee" and as "the father of the Common School System" in Tennessee. Remarks on William's position as the Chairman of "an efficient" committee on Education. As "We erect statues in Massachusetts to our great educational leaders," Bosson should have a sculpture erected to honor him. Updates him on some family affairs and an encounter with Prof. [Jean Louis Rodolphe] Agassiz at the Scientific School in Cambridge. Agassiz remarked on their last name and make a connection between Bosson and the Glacier de Bossons in the Swiss Alps. A manuscript note by William Bosson provides information on Charles P. Bosson and his family.
Page   80  
  [1869 August ] . Ms.; s.l. (2 pages)
A manuscript toast praising the author of the Tennessee free school law, offered at a dinner at the State Teachers Association in August of 1869.
Pages   80-81  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of the manuscripts on page 80.
Page   82  
  1871 October 17 . C[hristopher] R[hinelander] Robert ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; New York. (2 pages)
Regrets not meeting at Lookout Mountain; he hadn't realized William Bosson (1806-1887) was going to be there and would have enjoyed speaking with him. Responds to Bosson's letter and comments on "the state of education at the South." Bosson confirmed for him that education in the South was neglected during the Civil War. Not optimistic about changes being made towards "mental improvement of themselves or others" with the current generation. Connects education to intelligent voting. Suggests that Southerners should look to the North to see how education can be used to appreciate the value of land. Public schools. Waiting to hear about the [Jacob?] Erwin suit. "I have often thought that one of the greatest evils of Slavery, was that it caused everything to be done superficially, and as I judge, in nothing was this more Conspicuous than in education..." On "Robert College of Constantinople" illustrated stationery. A manuscript note by William Bosson states that Robert, "unaided," bought Hospital buildings on Lookout Mountain in 1866 and converted them into a High School, "as his letter explains."
Page   82  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of page 82.
Page   83  
  undated . W[illiam] Bosson Ms.; s.l. (4 pages)
William Bosson (1806-1887) begins outlining roles he assumed related to Tennessee education and the push for Free Common Schools. March 4, 1865, elected Senator for the 9th Senatorial District of Tennessee; declined position of Secretary of State offered by Gov. Brownlow; head of the "Committee on Education;" head of the "Ways and Means" and "Freedmen;" worked on improving Common School Law and funding. Provides a legal and political history of the establishment of Free Common Schools in Tennessee. [NB: A reference in the seven generation book suggests this is from William Bosson's journal.]
Pages   83-84  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (2 pages)
Typed transcription of William Bosson's manuscript on page 83.
Page   85  
  [1865 April 13] . [John Trimble] Ms.; s.l. (1 page)
"Resolution No. 26" by John Trimble. Prefaced with a quote from the Tennessee constitution Article XI, arguing for the establishment of free common schools. A manuscript note by William Bosson identifies the resolution and states that it was offered to the Senate on April 13, 1865.
Page   85  
  1879 January 2 . Ja[me]s D. Porter ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
"Private." Agrees with William Bosson (1806-1887) that the state debt is barring the State from "immediate prosperity." Likes Bosson's idea, but explains that "our legislature is laboring to discover how not to pay the debt, and I am afraid that the way has been found." Discouraged. "I hope that time will bring a reaction in public sentiment, and that we will be saved from impending disgrace."
Page   85  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Transcriptions of the manuscripts on page 85.
Page   86  
  undated . Charles [Thompson Bosson] ALS to William [Bosson]; s.l. (1 page)
Asks William Bosson (1806-1887) to visit Charles's old friends and classmates while in Boston. The list of potential contacts includes Robert Hoover, Hon. Thomas G. Gary, Charles P. Curtis, Hon. Edward Everett, Rev. Nathaniel L. Frothingham, Hon. George Morey, Hon. John Gary, James Russell, William P. Mason, Robert H. Osgood, Dr. Ed. Reynold. If William sees Jared Sparks, requests that he thank Sparks for his "kind attentions." Charles P. Bosson can introduce William to anyone he wishes to meet.
Page   86  
  undated . R[obert] N[ewland] B[osson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of manuscript on page 86, with an added note explaining the circumstances surrounding the letter from Charles to William.
Page   87  
  1864 September 14 . McAlister & Wheeless ALS and newspaper clipping to W[illiam] Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (2 pages)
Cotton seeds from Egypt sent to William Bosson (1806-1887) from a source in Washington and successfully produced cotton from them in Murfreesboro. McAlister and Wheeless write that Bosson's sample is "the finest sample of cotton, we ever saw grown in this country, save the Sea Islands." With a newspaper article reprinting Bosson's 'sample enclosed' letter and requesting local planters to let the editor(s) know whether or not anyone in the same climate has previously attempted to cultivate cotton on a large scale. An accompanying manuscript note by Bosson explains that McAlister and Wheeless are "prominent Cotton Brokers" in Nashville.
Page   87  
  undated . Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter on page 87.
Pages   88-91  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (4 pages)
Typed transcriptions of the note and letters on page 89.
Page   89  
  undated . W[illiam] Bosson ANS and hair; s.l. (1 page)
Envelope with note from William Bosson (1806-1887). The envelope contains letters by Julia/Julietta/Juliette Burnett (1831-1898), future wife of William Bosson, and a letter by Julietta's mother. A manuscript note by William Bosson states that he married Julietta Burnett on January 24, 1855, in Russell, Geauga County, Ohio. Bosson met her at a Sunday School convention in Sparta, Tennessee, in 1852 where she was staying at a boarding house to "escape the Winter of a Northern climate" "as an invalid." Suggests that his calling on her at her boarding house the same day they met "ripened to our final union." Below the envelope is another note from William Bosson (1806-1887) and a lock of hair from Charles T. Bosson's (1791-1864) 2-year-old daughter Sarah Beth Bosson.
Page   89  
  [ca. 1852] . Juliette [Burnett] ANS to [William] Bosson; [Sparta, Tennessee?]. (1 page)
Asks William Bosson (1806-1887) what form of answer he prefers, written or verbal.
Page   89  
  [1852?] June 28 . Juliette [Burnett] ALS to [William Bosson]; [Ohio?]. (4 pages)
Letter 4 of 4, page 89: Compliments William Bosson's (1806-1887) speedy letter-writing; mentions an afternoon spent together with another friend writing letters. The afternoon included a "delightful" conversation that made it "one of the happiest events of my life." Sending her likeness on the condition that he return it to her mother the next time he passes through the area. She will send him a better one when she is in Cleveland. Asks that he receive it "kindly" and anticipates receiving one from him. Mentions a visit by her physician. The doctor suggested she looked better and would recover but might have a "light" cough for the rest of her life. Refers to a letter her mother wrote to Bosson and asks for his thoughts on it. Worries that it might sour their relationship. Methodist meeting.
Page   89  
  [18]52 May 11 . Juliette Burnett ALS to [William Bosson]; Lebanon, [Ohio?]. (2 pages)
Letter 1 of 4, page 89: Addresses him as "Dearest Friend" despite Bosson having not addressed her by a similarly intimate title. Desire to see him again; is certain they will meet again. Identifies the location of her intense assuredness and hope in her heart rather than in her brain, as "Phrenologists always tell me the organ of hope is not largely developed in my head..." Visits the Beckwiths and Alexandria. Travel in the rain.
Page   89  
  [18]52 June 18 . Juliette Burnett ALS to [William Bosson]; Russell, Ohio. (4 pages)
Letter 2 of 4, page 89: Mentions letter and Sparta Times she received from William Bosson (1806-1887). Juliette is the consulted and trusted older sister figure for her younger siblings. Conversation she had with Bosson about leaving her "home, parents sisters, and friends all for you." She didn't know how she would feel about the question when he asked her but she now knows that she would: "you are dearer than they all."
Page   89  
  [18]52 June 28 . M. Burnett ALS to [William] Bosson; Russell, Ohio. (2 pages)
Letter 3 of 4, page 89: Juliette's mother is not able to determine his character because she never met him. Suggests that she will not oppose the marriage and that she trusts that Bosson and her daughter have thought carefully about their union and future together. Mentions Julia's health and Bosson's responsibility as her protector after marriage. Suggests that she does not believe that mothers should have a role in "maneuvering to establish their daughters." Separating from Julia will be difficult and she requests that Julia not leave while the weather is nice.
Page   92  
  undated . [William Bosson] Ms.; s.l. (1 page)
Manuscript note from William Bosson (1806-1887), with an accompanying typed transcription. This is labeled as a "SPECIAL FIRST PAGE" in the seven generations book. William's introductory statement about a series of documents he has collected and his desire for this collection to be preserved. The papers are letters of his father William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824), written between 1813 and 1817 and letters of his brother Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864). Makes special mention of communications by distinguished men: "W. Heath, a General of the Massachusetts Line in the days of 1775 a cousin of my mother," "Elbridge Gerry in 1802 Governor of Massachusetts & in 1813 Vice President of the United States," "Henry Clay, then Speaker of the Lower House of Congress," "Amos Kendall--lawyer, editor of the Frankfort Argus (Kentucky) & in 1832 Postmaster General appointed by President Andrew Jackson," "classmate Edward Everett & others of the class of 1811 Harvard University."
Page   92  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 92.
Page   93  
  1817 October 27 . William Bosson ALS to Charles [Thompson Bosson]; Roxbury, Massachusetts. (2 pages)
Letter from William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) to his son Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864). William states that his situation and that of his family are not very good on account of misfortunes that befell them later in life. Hearing that Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864) and William Bosson (1806-1887) are doing well brings him great joy. William (1753-1823 or 1824) suggests that his decision to visit must be determined by his own working situation. William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) recently toured the Western Country and checked in on his son Thomas, who was physically unwell but doing good business in trade. Asks that Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864) send him sugar or a Bale of cotton to help him and his wife get through the winter. Manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887): "In this I am referred to as 'a promising boy'- These letters of my Father breathe intense parental solicitude for the welfare of his children. I was at the writing of this letter Aug 27th 1817 near 11 years old W. Bosson"
Page   93  
  1815 [January ?] 11 . William Bosson ALS to [Charles Thomspon] Bosson; Roxbury, Massachusetts. (2 pages)
Mercantile matters (shipment of beef, inquiry about distiller Mr. Hutchings). Asks what Charles occupation/career is now as he has been told that law would not be the priority anymore. Encourages Charles to avoid party violence and stresses the importance of unification to drive the "barbarians" from the north and the south. "The War may end this year, should it not however desirous it will have the beneficent effect of making us a more Warlike people. I feel a pride that it has already produced officers who have distinguished themselves." Laments the death of Zebulon Pike.
Page   93  
  1807 December . Caleb James Noll Partially printed DS to Charles T. Bosson; [Cambridge, Massachusetts]. (1 page)
Bill for second quarter at Harvard, ending December 1807. Signed by Noll as paid.
Page   93  
  1811 April 4 . Caleb James Noll Partially printed DS to Charles T. Bosson; [Cambridge, Massachusetts]. (1 page)
Bill for third quarter, ending April 4, 1811. Signed by Noll as paid.
Page   93  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of letters on page 93. Misdated transcription: August 17 instead of October 17, 1817. Speculated the second letter is dated November 1815, most likely January 11, 1815.
Pages   94-95  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcriptions of the documents on page 93
Pages   95-96  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription for the letter on page 96; repeated transcription on page 96.
Page   96  
  1813 September 6 . E[lbridge] Gerry ALS to [Henry] Clay; Cambridge, Massachusetts. (1 page)
Enclosing Major General Heath's letter of introduction for Charles Bosson. Gerry explains that Charles is travelling west with the intention of possibly establishing himself. In addition to the good opinion of Bosson offered by Heath, he sought the opinions of others and can confirm that all hold positive opinions of him. Gerry states that he believes Bosson will make a good member of whichever State he chooses and requests Clay's "advice in aid of his pursuits, & recommendations of him to any of your friends for promotion of his objects." A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) supplies background to Gerry's governorship in Massachusetts and the relationship between Gerry and the term "Gerrymandering."
Page   96  
  1813 September 1 . W[illiam] Heath ALS to Elbridge Gerry; Roxbury, Massachusetts. (1 page)
Letter of introduction for Charles Thompson Bosson (1791-1864) to Elbridge Gerry [likely originally enclosed in the letter Gerry sent Henry Clay on September 6, 1813.] Heath states that Charles is going west and he affiliates Charles with Gerry's nephew, William Orne. Charles Bosson and Orne studied law together. Heath remarks that Bosson "...will be proud to be the bearer of any Commands you may place to lay upon him." A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) offers background information on Heath. Heath was a cousin of Susanna Bosson, Charles and William Bosson's mother.
Page   97  
  1816 April 22 . A[mos] Kendall ALS to C[harles] T[hompson] Bosson; Georgetown, Kentucky. (1 page)
Delayed mail; future papers will be dated Monday and will contain the news of Saturday's mail. One man sent to the penitentiary for horse theft; the other perpetrators ran off. Has been unwell and is medicating with Physic.
Page   97  
  1814 May 6 . Ben Johnson and Jos Beveridge DS (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Certification that Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864) can practice law "in all of the several Courts of Record within" the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Johnson and Beveridge, "Circuit Judges in and for the Commonwealth of Kentucky."
Page   97  
  undated . [Robert Newland] Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Transcription of letters and notes on page 97.
Page   97  
  1813 September 1 . Josiah Quincy ALS to John Rowan; Boston, Massachusetts. (3 pages)
Letter of introduction for Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864). Requests that Rowan assist Bosson in his goal of establishing himself as a lawyer in the "Western country" and asks Rowan's "advice and friendship in relation to his object." Quincy concludes his letter affectionately, recalling their acquaintance and lamenting that the "circumstances in which we are reciprocally placed, seem to prohibit the expectations of being able to cultivate it more intimately." A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) relates to Josiah Quincy and John Rowan. Quincy was a "prominent lawyer, a patriot in the war of 1776 & was the leader of the Federal party in Massachusetts in the days of Jefferson Administration." John Rowan served in Congress and as the head of the Supreme Court in Kentucky (Chief Justice). "He was celebrated as a Criminal advocate." According to Bosson, Rowan married Quincy's granddaughter.
Page   98  
  1864 April 9 . Edward Everett ALS to C[harles] T[hompson] Bosson; Boston, Massachusetts. (3 pages)
Indicates that he forwarded a portion/quotation of the letter William Bosson (1806-1887) sent him from [Chaplin] W[illiam] Earnshaw to the "Boston Daily Advertiser" (with his name omitted). "Our committee consider the Care of the Refugees from East Tennessee as fairly included among the objects of the liberal contributions confided to their care." Col. [N. G.] Taylor and [G. M.] W. Hazen, on behalf of the Knoxville Relief Association, have been alerted to this consideration and are responsible for receiving and investing "...the funds, collected in the Loyal states." Everett's Committee have also "remitted a portion of the sums confided to them." Reverend Thomas Humes is the chairman of the Knoxville Committee; Bosson should reference this letter should he "wish to make any communication."
Page   98  
  1852 June 8 . [Edward Everett] Ms. invitation to Charles T[hompson] Bosson; [Boston, Massachusetts]. (1 page)
An invitation from Edward Everett to Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864) to attend a Harvard class of 1811 evening gathering at "32 Summer Street, Boston" (Everett's home) on June 21, 1852 (Commencement day). Answer requested.
Page   98  
  1852 October 18 . Edward Evertt ALS to C[harles] T[hompson] Bosson; Boston, Massachusetts. (3 pages)
Description of the Class of 1811 gathering, with details about the event and who was able to attend. Mentions Fuller accepted but died before the event occurred. Everett also prepared a copy/copies of a recited poem by Dr. [Reverend Samuel] Gilman, "a kind of sequel to that which he delivered at Commencement," that guests enjoyed. Everett prepared six copies for each member of the class of 1811. Everett asks if he should send the copies to Bosson by mail. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) indicates that Edward Everett and Charles Bosson died within 23 days of one another in 1864.
Page   98  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of letters (June 8, 1852 and October 18, 1852) on page 98. An additional typed note by Robert Newland Bosson indicates that the Class of 1811 meeting occurred forty-one years after graduation. Bosson indicates that he will attending his own fortieth reunion at Wabash the year he writes this note. Laments that a copy of the poem referred to in the letter of October 18, 1852 was not preserved.
Page   99  
  1849 December 23 . Charles Thompson Bosson ALS to Jared Sparks; Falls of Caney, Tennessee. (1 page)
Request for copies of the catalogue and period publications, as he is entitled to them based on fees paid as an undergraduate at Harvard. Bosson has not had success thus far obtaining the catalogue. Bosson also requests a copy of the "College Laws," stating that he believes the coverage of 200 years of academic policy contained within will "be of much practical benefit to the young literary institution in this region."
Page   99  
  1850 January 12 . Jared Sparks ALS to Cha[rle]s T[homas] Bosson; Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts. (1 page)
Sending Bosson the last triennial, annual catalogue, the most recent revision of the College Laws, and the proceedings of the last Inauguration. Having an old alumnus (class of 1811) demonstrate that he has maintained an interest in the University and its current state brings him pleasure. On illustrated Harvard University stationery. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) states that Jared Sparks was "President of the Board of Fellows & Trustees of Harvard University."
Page   99  
  1851 January 24 . [Charles Thompson Bosson] AL (draft?) to Samuel Gilman; Near Rock Island, Warren County, Tennessee. (2 pages)
Reminisces about undergraduate years spent together. Expresses regrets for not choosing "a more quiet career" than the one he has assumed in the "wild West" or "been better prepared to meet the wild & rough scenes thro' which I have passed." Has read the notice by the N. E. Society of Charleston that suggests Gilman holds conservative sentiments that Bosson believes to be "worthy of and honorable to a descendent of the Puritans." Expresses discomfort with "the spirit of falsehood now abroad" that is disturbing "social peace" and is "adverse to the objects of social government" through its opposition to "love of our Country, its constitution, its laws & its Union." Fears that the lack of unity and devotion to the Country as a social and political entity could endanger the safety of national independence. Crossed-out text about classmates he has seen.
Page   99  
  1852 October 18 . S[amuel] Gilman ALS to [Charles Thompson Bosson]; Charleston, South Carolina. (2 pages)
Gilman's response to Dr. Humphrey, per Charles T. Bosson's (1791-1864) request. Dr. Smythe preached two sermons against it that were published in the Evening News and attacked Gilman's "denomination" rather than "confining himself to the subject of controversy." Gilman answered this attack with eight letters that he sent to the North and Evening News. Suggests he will publish more of the letters in pamphlet form "as I do not want to engross more public attention in this way." Inquires about whether Bosson has received the six pamphlets of the poem delivered during the Class of 1811 meeting in Boston sent by Everett. Lists who was able to attend the reunion and mentions Fuller's death. If Everett has not sent the pamphlets, Gilman will.
Page   99  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letters on page 99.
Page   100  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter (April 9, 1864) on page 98.
Page   101  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letters on page 99. A note by Robert N. Bosson suggests that Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864) wrote the letter to Gilman and likely never mailed it: "The writer seems to be depressed but anxious to give his views of the political trend of the times."
Page   102  
  1815 July 20 . William Bosson ALS to Charles T[hompson] Bosson; Roxbury, Massachusetts. (4 pages)
Letter from William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) to his son, Charles T. Bosson (1791-1864). Henry Whiting is coming to "your country" with Doctor Hawks. "...if he settles in the Western Country it will be a great advantage to society." Suggests that Whiting has information regarding Doctor Somers. List of items he will send to Charles, including a side saddle, cloth for a suit, and clothing. If the law books do not arrive with the items he is planning to send, they may be misplaced. He advises his son to send "another" memorandum if they cannot be found. He will send the items through Philadelphia to Pittsburg. Thomas and Mary are often "the subject of conversation;" suggests that he is planning to visit Charles in the fall of 1816. Thomas should be told that "Geo Wiggins "is much reduced and is a swindling fellow--"in that way he got from me 2000$." Mentions that John W Adams "is at Londonderry and is a poor D-L-." Sam Gilman "has let himself to a new society in Dorchester." College student protests on changes in recitation times (apparently imposed by the "Govt."). The Law Book request has been found. Catherine sent William a letter he was not allowed to see. William visited Mrs. Hobbs: "She loves you." Sharing information with Mr. Mayo, the son of Joseph Mayo, "the oldest Brother to your friend" who is in "Canidia." A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887), son of letter writer, about his parents' genealogy and nativity.
Page   102  
  1813 November 25 . William Bosson ALS to [Charles Thompson Bosson]; Roxbury, Massachusetts. (1 page)
William Bosson (1753-1823 or 1824) expresses joy in hearing that his son [Charles] is establishing himself in the West. Acknowledges the difficulty of beginning a career from scratch and expresses confidence that Charles will be able to build a successful career off of his education, "unblemished character," "an honorable profession with decent Library," "a good constitution," and "a preservering and active mind." Highlights the importance of defeating the British and driving them off of the continent, to ensure peace and secure "our Common Country." If the British are not removed, "Savage Barbarity will always disturb our frontiers." Fourteen persons are at the table for Thanksgiving.
Page   102  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter on page 102.
Page   103  
  undated . [Robert Newland] Bosson] Typed ms. (copy) ; s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter on page 102. With an additional typed note by Robert, describing the letter. It was "not enveloped but sealed with wax. No stamp was affixed, a post mark of Boston is shown."
Page   104  
  1872 August 7 . Hiram Powers and E[lizabeth] Powers ALS and ANS to William Bosson; Florence, Italy. (5 pages (total))
Quotation by Edward Joshua from "Nurses Philosophicae," that "memory is the mind." Believes memory is the storage center for the mind but does not agree that memory is constitutive of the mind. "How you looked personally, when I last saw you--is clean as a fresh picture in the outline--and so with your entire family." Is not optimistic that they will meet again while they are still alive. Powers' reports a decline in health and relays information on his life in Italy. Situated about 600 yards from the Roman Gate; has s garden with American trees, "Wellingtonia, the Red Wood, the Black Walnut, the [Pecan?] nut, the Butter nut, Hickory nut and many varieties of American apples." All of his children live nearby except for his youngest son (Edward Everett Powers), who studies engineering in Sheffield. One of his six children works in his studio and shows "much ability," while another is a photographer with property in Kansas. Powers has worked as a "successful American sculptor" in Italy after the past 35 years and will likely spend the rest of his days there. Gives William Bosson and his family an open invitation to the "old world," "It would pay--if you can spare the means--and it is an easy thing to journey now a days." Enclosing photographs and a list of captions for the photos by Elizabeth Powers [Photographs not present]. The note is a numbered list of 12 individuals, including Hiram and Elizabeth Powers, and their children and grandchildren. Does not have a picture of Edward Everett Powers (who works for Globe Steel Works) to send. Also included an image of a wedding party taken on the day of the wedding. A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) provides information about Hiram and Elizabeth Powers.
Page   104  
  1875 March 1 . James F. Noble ALS and 3 newspaper clippings to William Bosson; Cincinnati, Ohio. (4 pages)
Headed by a note by William Bosson (1806-1887): "Reminiscence of Cincinnati Enterprises in 1817 + 18 Steam Boat Vesta & Woodburn Cotton Factory." James F. Noble writes to William Bosson (1806-1887) about their shared interest in steamboat history and the Vesta. Asks Bosson to help him with inquiries about the Comet, the Eliza, the Defiance, and the Vesta. Hopes that Bosson can acquire the dimensions of the Vesta (including the engine) and information about whether or not the Vesta's boiler burst. Accompanied by three newspaper clippings of writings by Bosson, including one about his brother Thomas Mayo Bosson. A manuscript note by William Bosson contextualizes the items on the page.
Page   104  
  undated . [Robert Newland] Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter (March 1, 1875), notes, and newspaper clippings on page 104.
Pages   105-106  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the letter (August 7, 1872) on page 104. An additional typed note by Robert states that postal delivery was not as quick and easy as Mr. Powers describes.
Page   106  
  1877 April 21 . J[ohn] Braden ALS to W[illiam] Bosson; Nashville, Tennessee. (1 page)
Asks William Bosson (1806-1887) for feedback about changing the name of Central Tennessee College to "Rust University" as the current name is long and does not indicate church affiliation. A manuscript note by William Bosson provides background on the college and John Braden.
Page   106  
  [1937 February 7?] . [Robert Newland Bosson?] AN; s.l. (1 page)
A manuscript note in pen indicating that the attached envelope was opened on February 7, 1937, by W[illia]m Bosson, "Grandson of the maker of this scrapbook" in the presence of "Margaret Bosson Newnan of Detroit & Rosemary Bosson Rigsbee of Indpls., Robert N. Bosson a Brother, and his wife Dorothy Lease Bosson, and daughter Clara June and son Robert Wm."
Page   106  
  undated . W[illiam] B[osson] ANS; s.l. ( 1 page)
Note from William Bosson (1806-1887) indicating that the "sealed" envelope [affixed to page 106] contains letters addressed to William and his wife Julia, sons Thomas and William Bosson, and additional letters written in 1863 by William to Julia and to his brother Charles.
Page   106  
  [1872] September 23 . Julia Bosson and T[homas] M[ayo] Bosson ALS to [William Bosson]; [Greencastle, Indiana?]. (4 pages)
Julia/Juliette Burnett (1831-1898) writes to William Bosson (1806-1887), who is in Nashville. Misses him and was concerned he would get sick from the "excitement of the life with other disagreeable matters." "I can not believe that one who has spent the best part of his life in supporting those who had no reasonable claim upon his efforts is to suffer losses as a reward." "Col. Hall from Maine" is speaking tonight. Suggests Democrats have gone to Indianapolis for Greeley. Switching mattresses around when Bosson returns. Thomas writes about Hall's speech. Suggests he refuted "slanders against the administration." If Hall spoke in Tennessee, he would be able to persuasively "convert many democrats to Grant and Wilson." "He used Greeley and Sumner up."
Page   106  
  1876 June 27 . W[illiam] Bosson, Jr., and Julia [Bosson] ALS to [William Bosson]; Greencastle, Indiana. (4 pages)
Letter 5 of 6, page 106: "Willie" writes about the school commencement; Dr. Andrus, speaker. Mentions that he went "geoligizing" with mother; types of specimens, including types of coral. Plans to study geology and composition. Julia mentions Sunday school, a temperance meeting, rains, and Prof. Rodgers's honorary PhD from Wesleyan University.
Page   106  
  [1872] September 20 . Julia Bosson ALS to [William Bosson]; Greencastle, Indiana. (4 pages)
Letter 6 of 6, page 106: Writes a day after William Bosson (1806-1887) left Greencastle [visiting their old home in Murfreesboro, Tennessee?]. Hopes William will not get too worried and excited about his work. Tells William to look on the bright side and to remember to take care of his health and life. The boys go to school and study in the evenings. Bright weather.
Page   106  
  1875 June 6 . T[h]omas [Mayo Bosson] and Julia Bosson ALS to [William Bosson]; Greencastle, Indiana. (4 pages)
Letter 4 of 6, page 106: Storm damage, loss of two cherry trees and a dining room door. Railroad interrupted. Heavy rains and gardening. Few potato bugs. Sending a copy of the Star. Henry Stevenson May die soon. Supper with the Coles.
Page   106  
  1863 July 4 . W[illia]m [Bosson] ALS to Charles [Bosson]; Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (2 pages)
Letter 1 of 6, page 106: Attends the Union Convention at Nashville. Business prevents him from visiting. Has $30,000 in capital at Murfreesboro and Nashville.
Page   106  
  1863 July 12 . William [Bosson] ALS to Charles [Bosson]; Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (4 pages)
Letter 3 of 6, page 106: Supposes that sending letters to Charles may be unsafe, if intercepted. Julia and the family arrived in Nashville. Mr. Elliot gone for urgent supplies in Cincinnati. In ten weeks sold about $30,000; difficult work. Effects of the Treasury restrictions on trade. Remarks on war news: fall of Vicksburg, Lee's move into Pennsylvania, troops from the Eastern states heading to assist Meade; demoralization of southerners; Morgan's raid; Convention at Nashville. Redistricting Tennessee in advance of the elections. Need to restore the Civil government and halt the "lawless spirit" in the state. Large number of colored persons, men working "about the Army & women & children huddled together--many sicken & die."
Page   106  
  1863 July 4 . W[illiam] Bosson ALS to Julia [Bosson]; Murfreesboro, Tennessee. (2 pages)
Letter 2 of 6, page 106: Troops prepared to leave for McMinnville. Sent Julia coffee, shoes, sugar, and sundry articles. Goods just arrived and so he cannot leave Murfreesboro. Plans for Julia to come to Murfreesboro.
Page   106  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of the note and letter (April 21, 1877) on page 106. Robert writes that he thinks the letters were transcribed "in my copies;" "They had been studied by several members of the family and evidently were not returned to the envelope but left loose in the scrap book."
Page   107  
  [1869 July ?] . [T. E. Bliss] Pamphlet; Knoxville, Tennessee. (7 pages)
Imprint: "Address to the Governor, Legislature, and People of the State of Tennessee" (Printed at the Tennessee advertiser job office, Knoxville, Tennessee). A manuscript note by William Bosson (1806-1887) states: "This address came from a Committee appointed at a session of the State Teachers Association commenced at Lookout Mt. June 1869 & was written by Rev T. A. [sic.] Bliss of Memphis, Shelby Co." [NB: "T. A. Bliss" is almost certainly Bosson's fellow committee member Rev. T. E. Bliss of Shelby County.]
Page   107  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Transcription of Bosson's note about the pamphlet "Address to the Governor, Legislature, and People of the State of Tennessee" on page 107.
Page   108  
  undated . [William Bosson] Autobiography extracts to Thomas Mayo Bosson and William Bosson; s.l. (14 pages)
"Autobiography of Col. William Bosson," extracts and transcription of the reminiscences on pages 12 and 21 copied by Robert N. Bosson.
Page   108  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed note; s.l. (1 page)
Note on title page for "Autobiography of Col. William Bosson" typed by Robert N. Bosson. Robert's twin brother "Richard M. Bosson" printed copies that he shared with siblings and members of the Bosson family (in Tennessee and from Charles T. Bosson's line).
Page   109  
  [after 1822] . [William Bosson?] Ms.; s.l. (1 page)
Mayo Genealogy as given by Col. Bosson. Written on a sheet of blank checks from Hamilton Bank, Boston, Mass, 186-. Genealogical information. Includes names and dates of family members. Latest date recorded is 1822.
Page   110  
  undated . W[illia]m Bosson Ms. to Thomas Mayo Bosson, William Bosson; Murfreesboro, Tennesseee. (1 page)
Manuscript title page for the autobiography of William Bosson (1806-1887). Bosson states that the "This Portfolio records the testimony of my loyalty to the Government of the United States during the Great Rebellion of 1861, 1862, '63, '64, and '65. I was devoted to the cause of the Union . . . I leave these testimonials in the hands of my Sons, to show that there Father, though a citizen of Tennessee from 1841-18-was neither by thought, action or sympathy identified with the Rebellion but on principle, love of Country & its institutions, stood firm for the Union in the dark hours of the fierce struggle."
Page   111  
  undated . [Robert Newland Bosson] Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Typed transcription of title page of autobiography pages on page 110.
Page   113  
  [ca. 1879] . W[illia]m Bosson ms. (copy) to Thomas Mayo Bosson and William Bosson; Murfreesboro, Tennesseee. (15 pages)
"Auto Biography of myself," written by William Bosson at the age of 73. Autobiography details family history, rise of pro-Confederate and secession sentiment in Tennessee, intelligence Bosson shared with the Federal army, and Bosson’s loyalty to the Union.
Page   114  
  undated . [Thomas Mayo Bosson] Ms.; s.l. (5 pages)
Bosson genealogical information that spans five generations of Bossons. Multiple variant typewritten transcriptions of this document are in the genealogical documents accompanying the scrapbook. Concludes with Colonel William Bosson's (Thomas Mayo Bosson's father) family.
Page   114  
  undated . Robert N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
Transcription of the genealogy on page 114. Robert includes an additional note at the end of the transcription that indicates that his uncle, Thomas Mayo Bosson, wrote the genealogy. Indicates that genealogical information as well as "notes on family connection, ancestry, and burials " are preserved in a typewritten copy format.
Page   115  
  1884 October 21 . W[illiam] Bosson Ms.; s.l. (1 page)
William Bosson (1857-1934) implores the owner of a book of pressed flowers gathered from Henry Clay's garden to preserve it for 100 years to memorialize "the grandest statesman of the past of the American Age--who dying left an impression on the Country."
Page   117  
  1959 August 15 . R[obert] N[ewland] Bosson Typed ms. (copy); s.l. (1 page)
First note: Robert Newland Bosson worked on preserving the papers. He could not find the manuscript description of "the Book of Flowers" he had previously "recorded." Instead, he utilized a reprint from the Usher-Newnan papers prepared by Henry L. Newnan (brother-in-law) for the transcription on this page. Typed transcription of the manuscript on page 115. With an additional note by Robert Bosson indicating that the flower species are recognizable despite fading of color and that Colonel Bosson's impetus to preserve the flowers "hints of romance."
Page   118  
  1959 August 15 . Robert N[ewland] Bosson ANS; s.l. (1 page)
Concerning a trip he took to Nashville, Tennessee where he met members of the family and visited the grave of Thomas Mayo, Charles Thompson Bosson, and a member of the Hill family. Speaks of hospitality.