Port of Detroit (Mich.) Records,   1790-1827
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Port of Detroit (Mich.) Records [series]:
Box   1 F   1
February 16, 1790 Circular. To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Requests changes be made on a circular letter which was transmitted on December 1, 1789; June 9, 1790 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Requests an account of such vessels, goods, wares or merchandise that may have been seized, during the period for which your future quarterly returns may be rendered. April 28, 1791 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Instructions regarding strict uniformity in the returns of all customs. Also enclosed a new form of abstract duties on merchandise in which further provisions must be made. February 2, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Abstract drawbacks payable on the exportation of spirits distilled in the United States which will regulate the accounts rendered for settlement. July 21, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Transmitted form calculated to apply to different cases, stated in the said letter. Importance of framing receipts. August 4, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Circular. Requests certain alterations be made in the form of a quarterly abstract for the purpose of facilitating the computation of the duties so the Treasury can examine the accounts. November 14, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Circular. Requests accounts be rendered according to the provisions of the act concerning Fisheries of the United States. November 17, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Circular. Expenses and compensations relating to foreign distilled spirits, wines, teas be kept distinctly from those relating to spirits in the United States. December 24, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Secretary wishes that weekly returns sent may commence with each quarter. Further, may there be annexed to the last return, a schedule of dates and amounts of all remittances to treasury and payments to the bank. December 29, 1792 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Because of questions stated by the collectors of several districts, a circular communication for the purpose of uniformity of practice has been made. March 22, 1793 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. Concerning certain rates per cent allowed for the tares of coffee, pepper and sugar. March 23, 1793 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. Forms of oaths required to be taken in certain cafes in conformity of “An Act to establish a uniform rule of naturalization.” April 27, 1793 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. Questions concerning an act about the recording of ships and vessels. A new provision, however will not change those already recorded. May 22, 1793 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. Communication deeming the true construction of the 61st section of the collection law. It is necessary because of varied meanings. May 23, 1793 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. Requests that our vessels take with them something equivalent to a certificate of the number, quantity, and species of each article. Pertains only if going to France to Netherlands - they are not sure of the requirements. August 15, 1793 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. No foreign built ships are entitled to be registered which were not owned wholly or in part by a citizen of the United States. February 7, 1794 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Department of Treasury; (William Bradford). Circular. Philadelphia. Opinions regarding the cafe provisions, advising renewal of 12 months. November 17, 1794 To Collectors of Revenue. From Department of Treasury. Circular. Requests complete information regarding fund bonds that have been or may be taken to secure the payment of duties. April 22, 1797 To Collectors, Naval Officers and Surveyors. From Treasury Department. Information regarding Acts of Congress passed at the last session; concerning certain duties on snuff, sugar, and registration of vessels, etc. July 24, 1797 To Collectors, Naval Officers and Surveyors. From Treasury Department. Circular. Acts of Congress passed during the last session, and additional duties., 1790-1797
Box   1 F   2
May 7, 1798 To Collectors, Naval Officers and Surveyors. From Treasury Department. An Act to amend the Act retained by the United States. One and one-fourth per cent, rather than one per cent. June 6, 1798 To Peter Audrain, Esquire. From James Morrison; Supervisors Office, Lexington. Regards the distribution of official stamped papers. June 11, 1798 To Collectors. From Treasury Department. Circular. Questions as to whether brass in sheets is subject to 15 per cent added tax. Requests that practice be uniform throughout the United States. June 21, 1798 To Collectors. From Treasury Department. Regards an Act of Congress passed on July 13, 1798 suspending trade relationships with France. July 13, 1798 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Circular. Enclosed an act passed entitled An Act Concerning Aliens. Blank forms will be furnished from the Treasury for the returns required by the Secretary of State. September 19, 1798 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Regards Officers and marine compensation of Aliens in the United States. October 26, 1798 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. The last provision of the XXXII section of the Collection law has been misunderstood by several districts. March 27, 1799 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Instructions in hope of producing uniformity regarding misconstruction of law which has taken place. May 27, 1799 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Act of Congress regarding duties on imports and tonnage, quarantines and health laws, relief for sick and disabled seamen. July 27, 1799 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Circular. Regards the annexing of forms of abstracts that might be made out and transmitted with all documents which in the future, be referred to the treasury for a decision. August 19, 1799 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Circular. Concerns the Fourth Volume of the laws of the United States. Contains several acts passed at the 1st, 2nd and 3rd sessions of the 5th Congress. September 5, 1799 To Collectors of the Revenue. From the Treasury Department. Circular. Requests that the abstracts of drawbacks payable be made out to exhibit the amount of duties upon each article. October 28, 1799 To Collectors of the Revenue. From Treasury Department. Requests modification concerning the numbering and signing of all certificates to accompany foreign distilled spirits, wines and teas. April 13, 1800 Five letters to Matthew Ernest, Inspector of the Revenue at Detroit. From James Morrison. Congratulations upon making an appointment with the inspector. Accounts of expenditures. August 25, 1800 To Matthew Ernest. From Treasury Department. Enclosed the laws of the United States to the close of the last sessions of Congress. Four bound volumes, one pamphlet. Describes contents of each. Laws not included. January 13, 1801 To Matthew Ernest. From Treasury Department. Two letters. Answering previous letters of various points. March 9, 1801 To Matthew Ernest. From Treasury Department. Mentions accounts and small notes of business June 9, 1801 To Matthew Ernest. From Steele. Concerning the correction of Mr. Godfrey’s case. Will be corrected by charging the amount of the duties refunded, back. September 15, 1801 To Matthew Ernest. From Treasury Department. Concerns payment of duties on traders en route from this district to the Mississippi. October 26, 1801 To Matthew Ernest. From Steele. Regards corrections that were made on an over-charged account., 1798-1801
Box   1 F   3
January 5, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From David Duval. Regards ten per cent which was added to a balance that should not have been. Also includes a few other observations made from a previous letter. January 25, 1802 To Joseph M. Daniels District Attorney, Frankfort, Kentucky. From John Steele. Regards an opinion as to whether a section passed should pertain to boats which navigate the Western waters. January 29, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From John Steele. Regards law on the collecting of duties on manufactured wood. February 10, 1802 To Ernest. From James Morrison, Supervisor. Found 300 blank certificates along with imported spirits, wines and teas, and an account forwarded pricing them. April 27, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From Treasury Department. Information concerning merchandise transported over certain portages in the United States. April 27, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From Controllers Office. Regards a statement that was too late to be given to Congress. Suggests that the next one be made up and sent earlier. May 18, 1802 To Ernest. From Steele. Shows adjustments toward balances, commissions, taxes, etc. July 6, 1802 To Ernest. from Steele. Regards exemption of duties for portaging as stipulated in a treaty with Great Britain. July 7, 1802 To Controllers of the Treasury. From Albert Gallatin. Regards the provision which states that no duties shall be payable on any goods which shall be carried over any of the portages for the purpose of being embarked a second time. August 6, 1802 To Ernest. From Treasury Department. Provisions from Canada subject to duties. False report circulated to Indians about the establishment of a trading post at Fort Wayne, to alienate them from the United States. December 10, 1802 To Albert Gallatin. From John Steele. A copy of a letter submitted for consideration concerning transportation of merchandise over certain portages within the territory of the United States. December 10, 1802 To Albert Gallatin. From Treasury Department. Concerns the transportation of merchandise over certain portages within the territory of the United States. August 7, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From Albert Gallatin. Regards the establishment of mail routes to and from Detroit. August 18, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From David Rawn. Adjustment made to an account where a balance was due from this owner of account to the United States. December 4, 1802 To Matthew Ernest. From David Rawn. Concerns an error in calculating the duties on a quantity of spirits. Credit has been made for the difference., 1802
Box   1 F   4
January 4, 1803 To Matthew Ernest. from David Duval. Opinions regarding vessel payments by custom houses and soldiers aboard those vessels subject to taxes. August 1, 1803 To Matthew Ernest. From Albert Gallatin. Ordering the payment for troops be given in full to the officer. Also returns sent immediately. August 9, 1803 To Matthew Ernest. From David Duval. Inspector of the Revenue for Port Michilimackinac. Concerns duties on grain brought by British subjects to American mills. August 11, 1803 To Ernest. From Duval. Reviews duties governing admittance of vessels over 50 tons into district free of tonnage duty. Requests that if practice has been contrary, it immediately be corrected. September 15, 1803 To Ernest. From Duval. Regards the authorization to allow greater compensations than allowed by the law. September 19, 1803 To Ernest. From Duval. Adjustments of several accounts beginning January 1st and ending December 31, 1802. November 18, 1803 To Ernest. From Duval. Concerning water marks and secret marks of identification on United States ships and vessels. December 7, 1803 To Ernest. From Duval. Regards only inland trade in Detroit district., 1803
Box   1 F   5
February 15, 1804 To Ernest. From Duval All merchandise imported subject to the payment of duties. Requests these be adhered to. February 16, 1804 To Ernest. From Duval. Requests that sails and masts be purchased. March 16, 1804 To Ernest. From Duval. Concerns claims of the Schooner Wilkinson. May 23, 1804 To Ernest. From Duval. Regards complaints by William Walker about seized goods being released. September 20, 1804 To Ernest. From Gallatin. Concerns eight thousand dollars paid to the postmaster of the army. September 22, 1804 To Ernest. From Duncan. An account adjustment January 1,- December 31, 1803., 1804
Box   1 F   6
March 20, 1810 To Reuben Atwater. From Duval. A prosecution will take place as a penalty for not paying $500.00 as a notice for a delay beyond the time prescribed by law. August 28, 1810 To William Woodbridge. From Joseph Anderson, Treasury Department. A 17 year old minor cannot be the master of the schooner Eagle. September 10, 1810 To William Woodbridge. From Anderson. Concerns a letter received from Cook regarding the smuggling that went on in the district. January 21, 1811 To Reuben Atwater. From Duval. Regards the requests from Atwater for a copy of Duval’s letter to Dibley. March 2, 1811 To Collectors of Customs. From J. B. Varnum and John Pope. Printed circular. Regards trade between the United States, Great Britain and France. (partially cut out) March 7, 1811 To Reuben Atwater. From Duval. Requests the accounts for the 3rd and 4th quarters of 1801, which are late. March 14, 1811 To Collectors. From Duval. Circular. Concerns Acts of Congress passed at the last session. March 15, 1811 To Reuben Atwater. From Duval. Prosecution may take place not exceeding $500.00 for failing to forward statements of expenditures within the time prescribed by law. Unless an apology is made, court action will be taken. April 12, 1811 To Atwater. From Albert Gallatin. Regards the Act that forbids the entrance of the ports of the United States to British vessels which were in port when the Act took place. May 15, 1811 To Reuben Atwater. From David Duval. Reminder of the fact that late accounts are subject to a fine of $500.00. Requests forwarding immediately. August 19, 1811 To Reuben Atwater. From David Duval. Regards adjustment of receipts for the final payment made to George McDougall. September 20, 1811 To Controllers. From David Duval. Pertains to the services of the inspectors of the customs, it was satisfactory. October 14, 1811 To Atwater. From Gallatin. Regards the employment of inspectors for the Detroit and Lake Erie District. November 21, 1811 To Atwater. From A. Stafford. Regards the men who carry goods and services but who are not owners and are ignorant of the contents of their cargo. December 19, 1811 To Atwater. From Nathan Sufborough. Regards the fact that no appeal in the case of the United States against McDonnel can be had., 1810-1811
Box   1 F   7
February 14, 1812 To Atwater. From Richard Ruth. Concerns the speedy adjustment of accounts received. April 4, 1812 To Collectors. From Clay, Crawford. A printed circular explaining the Act laying an embargo on all ships and vessels in the ports and harbors of the United States, for a limited period of time. April 14, 1812 To Collectors. From Clay, Crawford. An Act to prohibit the exportation of goods, wares, and merchandise. June 16, 1812 To Collectors. From Clay, Crawford. Requests the completion of returns and quick transmittal. July 13, 1812 To Collectors. From Treasury Department. Printed. Regards an Act concerning the letters of Marque, prizes, and prize goods., 1812
Box   1 F   8
July 13, 1814 To William Woodbridge. From Treasury Department. Instructions on what to do when appointed to the office of collections. February 28, 1815 To William Woodbridge. From Treasury Department. Authority from the Governor of the Michigan territory- equally satisfactory to that of the United States Attorney. March 21, 1815 To William Woodbridge. From Treasury Department. Tariff of duties and account of penalties and forfeiting. April 18, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Dawson, Treasury Department. Acknowledges the receipt of previous letters and regards the use of certain documents. April 20, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Regards the actual cost of merchandise at various locations. April 24, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Two letters. Regards information about books and (2) Schooners Mink and Vermillion. May 24, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Anderson and Dawson (2 letters), Regards salaries and expenditures, (2) Information concerns what to do in the future with temporary registry and coasting license documents. June 15, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Treasury Department. Requests quarter yearly abstracts of all marine papers which may be in the district. June 30, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Copy of charges which must be rendered in an account at the end of the year. August 1, 1815 To Collectors of the Customs. From the Secretary of the Treasury. With a list of whose notes are not to be received after October 1, 1815 in any payment to the United States. August 28, 1815 To A. E. Wing. From Worthington, Treasury Department. Concerns a previous letter written about “Tide Waiters.” Under the law, there is no such thing. September, 1815 To Woodbridge. From Treasury Department. Concerns the requests from Deputy Mr. Wing for one boat., 1814-1815
Box   1 F   9
March 19, 1816 To Mr. Wing. From Anderson. Regards the question of whether to bring suit against a bond and the Schooner Fair American. May 10, 30, 1816 To Woodbridge (Collector of the Customs). From Dallas.(2 letters) Regards the smuggling of goods from Canada into the United States. June 6, 1816 To Dallas . From Woodbridge. Concerns stopping the smuggling of goods into the United States. January 22, 1817 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Concerns changing duties on goods which come into the United States. They are subject to the same duties as those going out. March 1, 1817 Copy of an Act concerning Unites States Navigations. From Speaker of the House and President of the Senate. May 2, 1817 To “Sir” From Anderson. Regards the tariff of duties established by an Act of Congress. May 21, 1817 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Regards requests for a better organization and also about money that arises from forfeiture. June 4, 1817 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. (2 letters), one concerns the sale of a vessel, in which the papers were transmitted back to the previous owner and a question of paying foreign tonnage. (2) To Treasury Department from Audrain concerning an Act of Congress which was passed “Plaster of Paris.”, 1816-1817
Box   1 F   10
April 25, 1818 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Regards a final decision- a petition applying for relief in relation to duty bonds. April 30, 1818 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Answer to a question regarding new papers if moved to different district. May 13, 1818 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Suggests that due precaution be observed before any exemption from duty be granted. May 14 To Woodbridge. From Terry, Danbury Ohio. Long letter about vessels, their cargo, and passengers. May 29, 1818 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Concerns clearing American registered vessels from one to another American port touching at British ports for cargo. June 10, 1818 To Woodbridge. From Crawford, Treasury Department. Requests the transportation of large decked boats to Michilimackinac. November 27, 1818 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Concerns the Schooner Hornet, which was seized last year. Requests her complete safety. May 5, 1819 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Regards the credit to the United States for $154.90. April 27, 1820 To Woodbridge. From Dawson. Regards magazine papers to Detroit., 1818-1820
Box   1 F   11
February 5, 1825 To Tracy. From Anderson. (copy) Regards the new steam ferry boat and its routes. June 12, 1826 To Woodbridge. From Anderson. Concerns the last session of Congress in which even though it was not brought up, it is understood that court action will still be taken against Newton. August 22, 1826 To Woodbridge. From Anderson . Regards the true value of pine board imported from Canada. June 11, 1827 To Farwell. From Anderson. (copy) Concerns the route of a sailing vessel., 1825-1827