Hemingway Family Papers,   1861, 2006, and undated
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Collection Scope and Content Note

Formats include a variety of paper and photographic materials. The account books have been inventoried only.

Please Note: 19 of the 78 volumes are moldy, are so indicated in the finding aid, and should be use with care by patrons.

A finding aid is available to assist patrons. It is divided into five units for each processor who processed the collection, and the last, sixth, unit includes volumes and oversized drawings. This collection was processed from January 2011-through January 2012 by Archivist M. Matyn and a series of supervised student volunteers and interns. Each student created a separate finding aid, minus the biography, of his/her work. R. Rodriguez’s finding aid was the first and includes the preliminary biography. A more complete biography is noted in the biography section of this finding aid. All of the images are in boxes processed by Veronica Rohr. This was a great effort and the students did a wonderful job. One Oversized folder of drawings and maps was found after processing in 2013 and processed by M. Matyn.

Rodriguez section Scope Notes: This collection, Boxes 1-4 and 1 Oversized folder, 1880-1881, 1895-1896, and undated, 2 cubic feet, consists primarily of Mr. Boyce’s lumber and salt company business correspondence and related materials divided into the following series: Business Correspondence, which includes, but is not limited, to sales slips, receipts, business statements, bank deposit slips, shipping slips, salt inspection slips from the Michigan Salt Inspector, various items dealing with Boyce’s steamers, railroad shipping slips, Michigan Central Railroad shipping slips, grocery receipts, post card advertisements, and other business correspondence. This series is divided into the following years, 1880, 1881, 1894, May-December 1895, January-March 1896, 1896, and undated. Personal Correspondence, which includes letters and bills from Helmouth Ladies College, London, Ontario for Jessie Boyce. Archie Boyce dental work bill, dental work bill. A letter to Mrs. Boyce from a Grand Rapids, Michigan tailor, 1896. Advertisements and Business flyers, 1895-1896. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. The oversized file is an advertisement for a saw company which includes pictures. Inventory, Paylogs undated, and other unnamed and undated receipts. Shipping Records-Lewis C. Slade May-October 1895. Western Union Telegrams, 1896. Treasurers of Osceola County 1895-1896. Letters from Sarah MacDonald, 1896. The letters from MacDonald are addressed to J. Boyce or J. Boyce and Sons and all ask for money, although it is unclear as to why.

Grose section Scope Notes: This collection, Boxes 5-9, 1891, 1897, 1899, 1914-1930, and undated, 2.5 cubic feet, consists primarily of Mr. Boyce’s business, legal, and financial correspondence and personal financial correspondence divided into the following series: Business Correspondence, which includes, but is not limited, to sales slips, receipts, business statements, bank deposit slips, shipping slips, various items dealing with Boyce’s steamers, railroad shipping slips, Michigan Central Railroad shipping slips, grocery receipts, post card advertisements, and other business correspondence. This series is divided into the following years, 1897, 1899, and undated and is organized alphabetically within each year. Boyce Personal Financial Correspondence, which includes letters, bills, receipts, cancelled checks and bank books, 1898, 1914-1930. These materials are organized into two alphabetical runs as per their original order. There are materials here related to Jessie Boyce, 1914-1928. There are also several bank accounts, materials relating to Kent Country Club, Grand Rapids organizations booklets in which the Boyces are listed. Of particular note is a Hauptman and Bradley branches of Michigan Central railroad map, 1891. Also of interest is an American Red Cross World War I Bureau of women’s Work, Knitting Instruction for wristlets, scarves, etc. for army men in the trenches, [1914-1918]. A “Petite Calendar” book for 1928 is found in Box 9 in the Grand Rapids National Bank folder.

Rohr section Scope Notes: This collection, Boxes 10-32 and 1 Oversized folder, 1872, 1947, and undated, 11.5 cubic feet (23 boxes), consists primarily of Mr. Boyce’s lumber and salt company business correspondence and related materials divided into the following series: Business Correspondence, which includes, but is not limited, to sales slips, receipts, business statements, bank deposit slips, salt inspection slips from the Michigan Salt Inspector, shipping slips and various items dealing with Boyce’s steamers, which is organized in the shipping records, railroad shipping slips, Michigan Central Railroad shipping slips, grocery receipts, and other business correspondence. Personal Correspondence, which includes sales slips, receipts, bank statements, grocery receipts, newspaper receipts, and insurance related letters. Various business advertisements and flyers, post card advertisements, some are very detailed. Business Receipts, Inventory, Pay logs undated, and other unnamed and undated receipts, Lumber Camp Records and Correspondence, Miscellaneous, Shipping Records are included. Of particular interest are: Box 1: Germain Piano Company, personal correspondence- 1899 Stallman Dresser Trunk, personal correspondence- 1899; Box 2: Shakespeare advertisement for window shades- undated Grand Rapids House- 1897, 1898; Box 3: Grand Rapids House- Arthur Sovereign, contractor- 1897; Box 4: Grand Rapids House- Arthur Sovereign, contractor- 1895; Box 5: Schooner George J. Boyce Trip Logs- 1895 Steamer Isabella J. Boyce Trip Logs- 1892 Roscommon Land taxes and county map- undated Grand Rapids House- Arthur Sovereign, contractor- 1897 Houghton Lake Lumber Company, Articles of Association- 1875 Michigan Central Railroad Ticket- 1897 Personal correspondence, Love Letter from Hellmuth College, London, Ontario- 1895; Box 6: “Topical Studies in American History” by John G. Allen- 1887 International Order of Odd Fellows correspondence- 1898, 1899 Knights of Pythias correspondence- 1895, 1899 Masonic Temple Association correspondence- 1898, 1900, undated Modern Woodmen of America correspondence- 1898, 1899, 1900 Family pictures- 1927, 1929, 1930, 1931, undated; Box 7: Family Finances- Celia Monseau, George Monseau- 1905, 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, undated Family Finances- Josephine Monseau, Academy of the Sacred Heart- 1908, 1909, undated; Box 10: Jonathan Boyce Travel Information to England- 1894; Box 14: Jonathan Boyce Estate Papers- 1902, 1903- undated Houghton Lake Lumber Company, Finances- 1883; Box 16: Checkbook- 1881-1892 Inventory and Appraisal of Purchased Farm Land- undated Property and County Maps- Pine Timber from Missaukee County- undated Property Descriptions, Bay County- 1872, 1891; Box 18: Survey of Osceola County Trees, Map- undated; Box 23: Boyce Photographs- 1895- 1947, undated Oversized Folder, 1 of 1, Land and Property Maps, County of Roscommon, Land with River shown, undated

Martin section Scope Notes: This collection, Boxes 33-59, 1873-1937, and undated, 13.5 cubic feet (27 boxes), this collection consists primarily of Mr. Boyce’s lumber and salt company business correspondence and related materials divided into the following series: Business Correspondence, which includes, but is not limited, to sales slips, receipts, business statements, bank deposit slips, salt inspection slips from the Michigan Salt Inspector, shipping slips and various items dealing with Boyce’s steamers, which is organized in the shipping records, railroad shipping slips, Michigan Central Railroad shipping slips, grocery receipts, and other business correspondence. Personal Correspondence, which includes sales slips, receipts, bank statements,This collections 1-27 grocery receipts, newspaper receipts, and insurance related letters. Various business advertisements and flyers, post card advertisements, some are very detailed. Business Receipts, Inventory, Pay logs undated, and other unnamed and undated receipts, Lumber Camp Records and Correspondence, Miscellaneous, Shipping Records are included. Of Particular Interest are: Box 1: An undated letter to Mr. Boyce from Mr. Bauman in which it states that bodies have been removed from Mr. Boyce’s father’s lot in a Muskegon cemetery. Another letter to Mrs. Boyce from a R. A. Christian complains about the cost of rent being raised a whole dollar, July 19, 1900. Box 2: An undated letter of particular interest to Mr. Boyce from C. Sheck, in which it discusses Sheck’s dislike for the climate and people of the Southern States, as well as his racist views. Box 3: A letter from Curphey Lumber discussing a possible outbreak of yellow fever in August 1899. A letter from R.C. Winslow, M.D., dated August 2, 1899, explaining to Boyce a head injury sustained by a woodsman, in which the Doctor gave medical attention to but the woodsman still perished. The Doctor was requesting payment from Boyce for his services. Box 4: A letter from Mr. Oly Olson to Jonathan Boyce dated February 10, 1898 in which it discusses how Mr. Olson went to a cemetery to find that George Boyce had his parents bodies as well as some other family members bodies moved to a different cemetery, and that the only bodies left in the cemetery lot were that of Jonathon’s “wife and Ed”. Box 5: An eggnog recipe that looks like it came from a bottle label. There is a receipt for automobile repair for Miss. I. J. Boyce from October 1, 1913. There is also a receipt for payment for a newspaper subscription to the Grand Rapids Press by a Mr. Boyce between May and June 1937. Box 6: A quote for cotton and woolen waste, which are paper making materials from Frank E. Fitts Mfg. and Supply Co. on September 28, 1896. Box 7: Letters from a Mr. John McVicar, dated November 1883 and February 1884, discussing the selling of sheep, and how to care for the sheep in order to get more money for them when selling them. There were also numerous companies trying to get Mr. Boyce to buy life insurance from their companies so that Mr. Boyce’s family would be taken care of after his death. Box 8: A card dated April 16, 1902 from the DeMolai Commandery No. 5 calling all members to participate in assisting in Jonathon Boyce’s funeral and burial after his remains returned from England. This shows that Jonathon Boyce was an active masonic member and that he was being honored. Photos of a burned down house. A printing block for name cards. Box 9: Letters dated January and November 1892 from the company Voigt, Herpolsheimer, and Co. about work being done to a house including the installment of carpet and shades. Box 13: Blue Print with Letter for a Steam Jump Saw from A.F. Bartlett and Co., March 20, 1893 Box 15: Property deeds for land bought by Jonathan Boyce from the Jackson, Lansing, and Saginaw R.R. Co. that state that the R.R. Co. maintains right to lay down railroads through property and to maintain rails already on property. In oversized folder: A patent from the state of Michigan to Boyce stating that Boyce purchased property that was land set aside for a school. Received patent rather than deed because it was government property. Box 19: A letter dated April 10, 1896 from a person who wished to remain anonymous warning Boyce about a Frenchman who wanted a job at Boyce’s camp to pay Boyce back for a dirty trick that Boyce played on him. The writer warned Boyce not to hire this Frenchman or any Frenchmen for that matter. Box 20: Shipping trip records one of which has a list of the Crew members, their position of the ship, and their wages, dated May 8-19, 1894.

White Section Scope Notes: This collection, Boxes 60-93 and 4 Oversized folders, 1874, 1956, and undated, 17 cubic feet (34 boxes), This collection consists primarily of Mr. Boyce’s lumber and salt company business correspondence and related materials divided into the following series: Business Correspondence, which includes, but is not limited, to sales slips, receipts, business statements, bank deposit slips, shipping slips, salt inspection slips from the Michigan Salt Inspector, various items dealing with Boyce’s steamers, railroad shipping slips, Michigan Central Railroad shipping slips, grocery receipts, post card advertisements, and other business correspondence. Box 1: This series is divided into the following years, July through December 1897-1899, and undated, and includes: Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Boyce Grand Rapids House, which includes receipts for materials, advertisements for materials. Of particular note is letters from contractors to Mr. Boyce refusing to pay his bill charging them for the extra time it took to complete their services. Also of interest is the correspondence between Mr. Boyce and lead contractor Arthur Sovereign.Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1897 Shipping Records, August – December 1897 Western Union Telegrams, 1897 Box 2: This series is divided into the following years, 1895, May through December 1896, 1897 and undated. Of particular interest in 1896 Boyce was having trouble with both the F.W. Wheeler and Co and Toledo Lumber and Manufacturing Co. and their inability to pay their accounts. In the case of F.W. Wheeler and Co. a note of theirs was given to a Mr. Fred C. Ross, this note was then sold to Jonathan Boyce who in turn sold the note to Mr. C.C. Billinghurst, this note was unable to be cashed due to lack of funds on behalf of the F.W. Wheeler and Co. Further correspondence also shows that Mr. C.C. Billinghurst was also in involved with the Toledo Lumber and Manufacturing unpaid account and protested note. Other materials include: Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Inventory, Pay logs, etc. 1896 Shipping Records, November Miscellaneous- Correspondence shows that Jonathan Boyce had a conflict with the Buffalo Car manufacturing Co., they state that Boyce sent them low quality wood. The company even hired their own inspector to prove this and state that they will only pay for the pieces that our of good quality in the stock, the rest is Boyce’s responsibility. Box 3: This series is divided into the following years, 1892, 1893, 1894, January through November 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in letter from Archie Boyce to his father Jonathan Boyce he describes that the area where the lumber camps were the weather was particularly dry and the camps were being threatened with wild fires. Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Of particular interest is the advertisement for the Great Western Smelting Refining Co. which has an amusing ad featuring a story and comic illustrations. Boyce Business Receipts – Of particular interest is a bound account book of Jonathan Boyce’s for John Tennant, the grocer from which he bought his supplies from. The account log shows items bought such as syrup, salt, coffee boiler, vinegar and much more. Other materials include Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1895, and Shipping Records, January-April 1895. Box 4: This series is divided into the following years 1894, February through September 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1895 Boyce was having a dispute with D.S. Pate and Co. over the price of mull cull lumber. Boyce says the price is $5.50 while D.S. Pate and Co. says that they had reached an agreement for $5.00. Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Personal Correspondence – It appears Boyce was attempting to bail a John McEachem out of a corrections facility. Also of interest is that an Isabella Boyce seems to have returned to Grand Rapids from Liverpool, England based on ship customs invoice from the United States Express Company and shipping invoice from Geo. W. Wheatley and Co. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1895; Legal Correspondence – Of particular interest in 1895 in the case of Alfred M. King vs. Boyce, the court rendered a judgment in favor of Powers and Boyce had to pay him $ 34.75 for one and half month’s work.; Shipping Records, July-September 1895. Box 5: This series is divided into the following years 1896, January-April 1897 and Undated. Of particular interest in January 25, 1897 there is a letter from Archie Boyce to his father talking about the horses at the lumber camp; Discussing how well they are doing and that they are going to be hooking them up to sleighs soon.Legal Correspondence – Of particular interest in 1897 Boyce was trying to appeal a decision made by the courts in the case of Schroeder vs. Boyce. Also in 1897, the law office of Palmer, McDonald and Palmer are claiming collection against Jonathan Boyce of $69.50 for damages done by Boyce’s ship “G.J. Boyce” to the steamer “Chief Justice Wai’e”. Michigan Central Railroad Co. – In 1897 Boyce was refusing to pay for damages done to one of their cars that had been broken due to a tree falling on it. Other materials include: Advertisements and Business flyers, Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed; Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc. , 1897; Personal Correspondence; Shipping Records, July-September 1897.Box 6: This series is divided into the following years 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1943 and 1952.Personal Correspondence – In 1943, the city of Grand Rapids stated that the houses owned by Jessie L. Boyce located on 334 and 342 Division Ave. did not conform to ordinance of Grand Rapids and that if it did not conform within ten days she would be cited with penalty charges. The house on 334 Division Ave. was cited as condemned.” Once in again in 1952, Jessie L. Boyce was cited by the city of Grand Rapids for not following city ordinance for the house on 334 Division Ave. and the house was considered an unsanitary dwelling. Boyce, South Division Street Widening Case – In 1924, Isabella J. Boyce was part of a committee opposed to the widening of Division Avenue south between Fulton and Wealthy Street. In 1926, the city was stopped from widening Division Avenue. and Isabella J. Boyce had to pay $420 in attorney fees. In 1925, the Board of Assessors of the city of Grand Rapids was preparing assessment roll for the estimated expense of paving Division Ave. from Monroe to Wealthy Street; along with the widening of the section of the street by taking 12 feet off the front end of the property on the east side of the street. In 1927, the city attorney had been instructed to commence condemnation proceedings to acquire the necessary property for the widening of Division. In 1928, widening process was approved and to begin work in August; Isabella had to give up 12 feet of her property. Box 7: This series is divided into the following years 1898, 1899 and Undated. Of particular interest there is a rumor that Jonathan Boyce is planning to build a beet sugar factory in Essexville according to correspondence from The Engineering Record. Advertisements and Business flyers, October-September 1899. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1898-1899, Legal Correspondence ; Personal Correspondence; Michigan Central Railroad Co.; Shipping Records, September 1899. Box 8: This series is divided into the following years 1900. Of particular interest in 1900 Jonathan Boyce’s lumber mill burned down according to insurance records and letter from A.R. Roquette. Advertisements and Business flyers, January- October 1900. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc. ,1900; Legal Correspondence; Personal Correspondence – In 1900 Jonathan Boyce was planning a trip to London; Michigan Central Railroad Co.; Shipping Records, September 1900 – In 1900 Jonathan Boyce sold his vessel the “Isabella Boyce.” Box 9: This series is divided into the following years 1909, 1910, 1911, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928 and undated. Boyce Personal Correspondence – In 1925 Isabella J. Boyce received a letter from University of Michigan informing her that her son Gordon was being put on probation list due to the unsatisfactory character of his work. Also in that year Isabella J. Boyce’s other son, Jonathan, was starting school at University of Michigan. In 1925, Gordon Boyce had a root canal, a crown and a gold filling done by a dentist. (Box 30) In 1926, Isabella J. Boyce received a letter from her son Gordon telling her that he would be withdrawing from his classes at University of Michigan and would return back to his studies the following summer; this was due to the advice given to him from the dean on the basis on his unsatisfactory performance. Boyce Personal Receipts – Personal check receipt book from Isabella J. Boyce. Miniature check receipt book from Isabella J. Boyce in 1920 and 1921. Box 10: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1894 the Rock Island Lumber and MFG. Co. sent Jonathan Boyce a copy of their staff and yearly wages and asked in turn for Boyce’s wage records so that they could check that their wages were in line with the rest of the industry. Advertisements and Business flyers, October-November 1894. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Michigan Central Railroad Co. – In 1897 Boyce was refusing to pay for damages done to one of their cars that had been broken due to a tree falling on it. Other materials included: Boyce Business Receipts; Legal Correspondence; Personal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Michigan Central Railroad Co. .Box 11: This series is divided into the following years 1894, 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1894 Jonathan Boyce received a sidewalk notice from the council chamber in the village of Essexville, stating that the sidewalk on the east side of Cangstart Street in front of his lot was in dangerous condition and he had seven days to repair it. Boyce Shipping Records – Of particular interest in 1895 the vessel “Isabella” sprung a leak and caused the corn stock on the ship to be wet. The leak came from a careless engineer who left the valves of the seacock open, which froze during the winter and burst. Other materials include: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 12: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893, 1895 and undated. Advertisements and Business flyers, January- October 1900. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc.- For 1893 there is a lumber cut season records for that season; Legal Correspondence; Michigan Central Railroad Co.; Shipping Records. Personal Correspondence – In 1892 Jonathan Boyce was considering buying a house from a H.W. McCormick. This deal would include his residence, barn and three lots on the corner of Centre Ave. and Birney Street. (No city is specified in this correspondence) Box 13: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce, John Pilditch, Tuscola County House – In 1895 Jonathan Boyce was having a house, farm and various sheds built in Wisner Township, Tuscola County. Detailed log of the carpenters and joiners labor on the construction; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 14: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce Legal Correspondence – In 1895 Jonathan Boyce was seeking to force payment on a Mr. Smith for $152.04 in damages; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 15: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1895 Jonathan Boyce received a letter from the sheriff 's office in Ogemaw County stating that there was a stray team about six miles from town and that a man claiming to be an employee of Boyce’s came to claim the team. The Sheriff wanted to know if the employee was in fact his and what Boyce planned to do about the situation. Also in 1895 an employee of Jonathan Boyce by the name of Ernest Wicks, who worked at one of his lumber camps, got his leg broken due to a kick from a horse. He sent a letter to Boyce asking for his wages and the collection of money that had been gathered by the boys at the lumber camp. Also included are: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 16: This series is divided into the following years 1892 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Postal Telegraph-Cable Co. materials. Box 17: This series is divided into the following years 1892 and undated. Of particular interest in 1892 Archie Boyce sent a letter to his father, Jonathan Boyce, telling him that since they only have one train available to them they have a whole team waiting around with nothing to do. Archie suggests that his father should contact the railroad people about getting more trains out to the lumber camp. He also talks about a very sick horse he has at the camp. (Box 43?) Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Telegrams. Box 18: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893 and undated. Of particular interest is a letter dated December 15,1892, Archie Boyce sent to his father, Jonathan Boyce, telling him about how he received new horses at camp. Also that he requests more whips from the man that previously brought him some with the horses. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records. Box 19: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1892, Jonathan Boyce was sent a bill from the American Casualty Insurance and Security Co. for $57.87 pertaining to doctor’s bills for seven injured employees. Also in 1893, there is a newspaper clipping form the Morning Patriot discussing the new Union Lumber Company of Jackson and that they had purchased the Plummer Lumber Mill. Also included are: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence. Box 20: This series is divided into the following years 1893 and 1894, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Postal Telegraph-Cable Co. – Of particular interest in 1894 Jonathan Boyce sold his schooner “Levi.” Box 21: This series is divided into the following years 1874, 1877, 1878, 1879 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts. Boyce Legal Correspondence – In 1878 Jonathan Boyce bought land in Roscommon County from a Robert D. Robinson for $500.00. Flint and Pere Marquette Railroad Company – In 1874 Jonathan Boyce was forced to give up land to the railroad company due to land grants given by the state of Michigan to aid Box 22: This series is divided into the following years 1881, 1882 and undated. Of particular interest in 1882 Jonathan Boyce bought parcels of land in Denton Township, Roscommon County, for $40,000. Boyce Auditor General’s Report – List of all the tracts of land owned by Jonathan Boyce in Roscommon County and the amount he paid in taxes on those properties in 1881. Also included are: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence. Jackson, Lansing and Saginaw Railroad Company – In 1882 Jonathan Boyce bought land from Jackson, Lansing and Saginaw Railroad Company for $28,056. Box 23: This series is divided into the following years 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893. Boyce Grove Farm – In 1890 Jonathan Boyce bought Grove Farm in Tivethall, St. Margret in Norfolk, England from John Aldous. Boyce Insurance on Grove Farm – In December 1891 Jonathan Boyce paid 2,000 pounds to The Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Co. for Grove Farm he bought the previous year. The insurance covered property including the farmhouse, dairy, scullery, a range of poultry houses, stable, hay barn, range of bullock sheds, range of wagon and cart barns, turnip house, piggeries, and five tenant cottages. Boyce shipping Records – Jonathan Boyce’s schooner “Levi Grant” was in a collision with a tug “Tom Brown”, which had one large dump scow in tow. The collision caused broken planks, rails, anchor stocks and stanchion besides other damages. Boyce Legal Correspondence – Jonathan Boyce bought parcels of land in Roscommon County from Matthew Wilson for $15,000 in May 1892. Box 24: This series is divided into the following years 1893 and undated. Boyce American Casualty Insurance and Security Company- In 1893 Jonathan Boyce took out a $50,000 insurance policy with American Casualty Insurance and Security Company. Also in October of 1893 Jonathan Boyce paid John Suyder $10.20 due to injuries sustained on August 31, 1893. Also he paid Ed Tackle $5.53 for injuries sustained on September 18, 1893. These payouts were recorded on Proof of Loss insurance paper under the American Casualty Insurance and Security Company policy. Boyce Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society – In 1893 Jonathan Boyce took out a $1,500 fire insurance policy on the equipment in the schooner “Levia Grant” while it was stored in a building at Number 215 Franklin Street at Michigan City, Indiana. The policy covered equipment such as sails, cordage running gear tow and running lines, cabin furniture cooking utensils, crockery, compasses and color blocks. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Business Correspondence; Boyce Legal Correspondence . Box 25: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and 1896. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Business Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records. Boyce Legal Correspondence – It appears that Jonathan Boyce and Geo. Boyce were having a dispute over land in Roscommon County. In October 29, 1895 the court partitioned the land between the two parties. Box 26: This series is divided into the following years 1898, 1899 and undated. Boyce Chicago Insurance Company – In 1898 Jonathan Boyce took out a $1,000 insurance policy from the Chicago Insurance Company on the schooner “Geo. J. Boyce.” The policy also covered the schooner’s hull, body, tackle, apparel, engines, steam pumps, gauges and connections, machinery, furniture, small boats, general outfit and equipment. Boyce Legal Correspondence – In 1899 Jonathan Boyce signed a contract with the Michigan Salt Association that stated that he would solely make/provide salt for the association. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Business Correspondence. Box 27: This series is divided into the following years 1878-1956 and undated, and includes: Jonathan Boyce Deeds; Jonathan Boyce Check Book; Jonathan Boyce Estate Papers; Jonathan Boyce Receipts; Jonathan Boyce Tax Receipts. Box 28: This series is divided into the following years 1912-1961 and undated, and includes: J. Gordon Boyce Diary; J. Gordon Boyce, Financial Ledger; Jessie L. Boyce Valier Corporations. J. Gordon Boyce Birthday Greetings Book with the following birthdays: Mrs. J. Boyce, March 17. Chauney Todd, June 8. J. Gordon Boyce, June 29, 1906. Ruth A. Winegar, August 3. Jessie L. Boyce, October 31. Comstock Russell, December 6, 1907. Box 29: This series is divided into the following years 1890 and 1891, Boyce, Bills, Receipts and Cancelled Checks. Box 30: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1894 and 1895, Boyce, Bills, Receipts and Cancelled Checks. Box 31: This series is divided into the following years 1896, 1897, 1898 and 1899, Boyce, Bills, Receipts and Cancelled Checks. Box 32 This series is divided into the following years 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897 and undated. Also included are: Boyce, I. J. Boyce Ship Trip Book; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce, Schooner Jessie L. Boyce Ship Supplies Book. Box 33: This series is divided into the following years 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889 and 1893, Boyce, Check Receipt Booklets.

White section Scope and Contents Notes: This collection, Boxes 60-94 and 4 Oversized folders 1874, 1956 and undated, 17 cubic feet (34 boxes). This collection consists primarily of Mr. Boyce’s lumber and salt company business correspondence and related materials divided into the following series, chronologically and alphabetically: Business Correspondence, which includes, but is not limited, to sales slips, receipts, business statements, bank deposit slips, shipping slips, salt inspection slips from the Michigan Salt Inspector, various items dealing with Boyce’s steamers, railroad shipping slips, Michigan Central Railroad shipping slips, grocery receipts, post card advertisements, and other business correspondence. Box 1: This series is divided into the following years, July through December 1897-1899, and undated, and includes: Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Boyce Grand Rapids House, which includes receipts for materials, advertisements for materials. Of particular note is letters from contractors to Mr. Boyce refusing to pay his bill charging them for the extra time it took to complete their services. Also of interest is the correspondence between Mr. Boyce and lead contractor Arthur Sovereign. Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1897 Shipping Records, August – December 1897 Western Union Telegrams, 1897 Box 2: This series is divided into the following years, 1895, May through December 1896, 1897 and undated. Of particular interest in 1896 Boyce was having trouble with both the F.W. Wheeler and Co and Toledo Lumber and Manufacturing Co. and their inability to pay their accounts. In the case of F.W. Wheeler and Co. a note of theirs was given to a Mr. Fred C. Ross, this note was then sold to Jonathan Boyce who in turn sold the note to Mr. C.C. Billinghurst, this note was unable to be cashed due to lack of funds on behalf of the F.W. Wheeler and Co. Further correspondence also shows that Mr. C.C. Billinghurst was also in involved with the Toledo Lumber and Manufacturing unpaid account and protested note. Other materials include: Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Inventory, Pay logs, etc. 1896 Shipping Records, November Miscellaneous- Correspondence shows that Jonathan Boyce had a conflict with the Buffalo Car manufacturing Co., they state that Boyce sent them low quality wood. The company even hired their own inspector to prove this and state that they will only pay for the pieces that our of good quality in the stock, the rest is Boyce’s responsibility. Box 3: This series is divided into the following years, 1892, 1893, 1894, January through November 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in letter from Archie Boyce to his father Jonathan Boyce he describes that the area where the lumber camps were the weather was particularly dry and the camps were being threatened with wild fires.Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Of particular interest is the advertisement for the Great Western Smelting Refining Co. which has an amusing ad featuring a story and comic illustrations. Boyce Business Receipts – Of particular interest is a bound account book of Jonathan Boyce’s for John Tennant, the grocer from which he bought his supplies from. The account log shows items bought such as syrup, salt, coffee boiler, vinegar and much more. Other materials include Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1895, and Shipping Records, January-April 1895.Box 4: This series is divided into the following years 1894, February through September 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1895 Boyce was having a dispute with D.S. Pate and Co. over the price of mull cull lumber. Boyce says the price is $5.50 while D.S. Pate and Co. says that they had reached an agreement for $5.00. Advertisements and Business flyers, December 1898, February-November 1899, and undated. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Personal Correspondence – It appears Boyce was attempting to bail a John McEachem out of a corrections facility. Also of interest is that an Isabella Boyce seems to have returned to Grand Rapids from Liverpool, England based on ship customs invoice from the United States Express Company and shipping invoice from Geo. W. Wheatley and Co. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1895; Legal Correspondence – Of particular interest in 1895 in the case of Alfred M. King vs. Boyce, the court rendered a judgment in favor of Powers and Boyce had to pay him $ 34.75 for one and half month’s work.; Shipping Records, July-September 1895. Box 5: This series is divided into the following years 1896, January-April 1897 and Undated. Of particular interest in January 25, 1897 there is a letter from Archie Boyce to his father talking about the horses at the lumber camp; Discussing how well they are doing and that they are going to be hooking them up to sleighs soon. Legal Correspondence – Of particular interest in 1897 Boyce was trying to appeal a decision made by the courts in the case of Schroeder vs. Boyce. Also in 1897, the law office of Palmer, McDonald and Palmer are claiming collection against Jonathan Boyce of $69.50 for damages done by Boyce’s ship “G.J. Boyce” to the steamer “Chief Justice Wai’e”. Michigan Central Railroad Co. – In 1897 Boyce was refusing to pay for damages done to one of their cars that had been broken due to a tree falling on it. Other materials include: Advertisements and Business flyers, Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed; Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc. , 1897; Personal Correspondence; Shipping Records, July-September 1897. Box 6: This series is divided into the following years 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928, 1929, 1930, 1932, 1943 and 1952. Personal Correspondence – In 1943, the city of Grand Rapids stated that the houses owned by Jessie L. Boyce located on 334 and 342 Division Ave. did not conform to ordinance of Grand Rapids and that if it did not conform within ten days she would be cited with penalty charges. The house on 334 Division Ave. was cited as “condemned.” Once in again in 1952, Jessie L. Boyce was cited by the city of Grand Rapids for not following city ordinance for the house on 334 Division Ave. and the house was considered an unsanitary dwelling. Boyce, South Division Street Widening Case – In 1924, Isabella J. Boyce was part of a committee opposed to the widening of Division Avenue south between Fulton and Wealthy Street. In 1926, the city was stopped from widening Division Avenue. and Isabella J. Boyce had to pay $420 in attorney fees. In 1925, the Board of Assessors of the city of Grand Rapids was preparing assessment roll for the estimated expense of paving Division Ave. from Monroe to Wealthy Street; along with the widening of the section of the street by taking 12 feet off the front end of the property on the east side of the street. In 1927, the city attorney had been instructed to commence condemnation proceedings to acquire the necessary property for the widening of Division. In 1928, widening process was approved and to begin work in August; Isabella had to give up 12 feet of her property. Box 7: This series is divided into the following years 1898, 1899 and Undated. Of particular interest there is a rumor that Jonathan Boyce is planning to build a beet sugar factory in Essexville according to correspondence from The Engineering Record. Advertisements and Business flyers, October-September 1899. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc., 1898-1899, Legal Correspondence ; Personal Correspondence; Michigan Central Railroad Co.; Shipping Records, September 1899. Box 8: This series is divided into the following years 1900. Of particular interest in 1900 Jonathan Boyce’s lumber mill burned down according to insurance records and letter from A.R. Roquette. Advertisements and Business flyers, January- October 1900. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc. ,1900; Legal Correspondence; Personal Correspondence – In 1900 Jonathan Boyce was planning a trip to London; Michigan Central Railroad Co.; Shipping Records, September 1900 – In 1900 Jonathan Boyce sold his vessel the “Isabella Boyce.” Box 9: This series is divided into the following years 1909, 1910, 1911, 1915, 1916, 1917, 1918, 1919, 1920, 1921, 1922, 1923, 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1928 and undated. Boyce Personal Correspondence – In 1925 Isabella J. Boyce received a letter from University of Michigan informing her that her son Gordon was being put on probation list due to the unsatisfactory character of his work. Also in that year Isabella J. Boyce’s other son, Jonathan, was starting school at University of Michigan. In 1925, Gordon Boyce had a root canal, a crown and a gold filling done by a dentist. (Box 30) In 1926, Isabella J. Boyce received a letter from her son Gordon telling her that he would be withdrawing from his classes at University of Michigan and would return back to his studies the following summer; this was due to the advice given to him from the dean on the basis on his unsatisfactory performance. Boyce Personal Receipts – Personal check receipt book from Isabella J. Boyce. Miniature check receipt book from Isabella J. Boyce in 1920 and 1921. Box 10: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1894 the Rock Island Lumber and MFG. Co. sent Jonathan Boyce a copy of their staff and yearly wages and asked in turn for Boyce’s wage records so that they could check that their wages were in line with the rest of the industry. Advertisements and Business flyers, October-November 1894. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Michigan Central Railroad Co. – In 1897 Boyce was refusing to pay for damages done to one of their cars that had been broken due to a tree falling on it. Other materials included: Boyce Business Receipts; Legal Correspondence; Personal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Michigan Central Railroad Co. Box 11: This series is divided into the following years 1894, 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1894 Jonathan Boyce received a sidewalk notice from the council chamber in the village of Essexville, stating that the sidewalk on the east side of Cangstart Street in front of his lot was in dangerous condition and he had seven days to repair it. Boyce Shipping Records – Of particular interest in 1895 the vessel “Isabella” sprung a leak and caused the corn stock on the ship to be wet. The leak came from a careless engineer who left the valves of the seacock open, which froze during the winter and burst. Other materials include: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 12: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893, 1895 and undated. Advertisements and Business flyers, January- October 1900. Various business advertisements and flyers some are very detailed. Other materials include: Boyce Business Receipts; Inventory, Pay logs, etc.- For 1893 there is a lumber cut season records for that season; Legal Correspondence; Michigan Central Railroad Co.; Shipping Records. Personal Correspondence – In 1892 Jonathan Boyce was considering buying a house from a H.W. McCormick. This deal would include his residence, barn and three lots on the corner of Centre Ave. and Birney Street. (No city is specified in this correspondence) Box 13: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce, John Pilditch, Tuscola County House – In 1895 Jonathan Boyce was having a house, farm and various sheds built in Wisner Township, Tuscola County. Detailed log of the carpenters and joiners labor on the construction; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 14: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce Legal Correspondence – In 1895 Jonathan Boyce was seeking to force payment on a Mr. Smith for $152.04 in damages; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 15: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1895 Jonathan Boyce received a letter from the sheriff’s office in Ogemaw County stating that there was a stray team about six miles from town and that a man claiming to be an employee of Boyce’s came to claim the team. The Sheriff wanted to know if the employee was in fact his and what Boyce planned to do about the situation. Also in 1895 an employee of Jonathan Boyce by the name of Ernest Wicks, who worked at one of his lumber camps, got his leg broken due to a kick from a horse. He sent a letter to Boyce asking for his wages and the collection of money that had been gathered by the boys at the lumber camp. Also included are: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Advertisement, Flyers; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Western Union Telegraphs. Box 16: This series is divided into the following years 1892 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Postal Telegraph-Cable Co. materials.Box 17: This series is divided into the following years 1892 and undated. Of particular interest in 1892 Archie Boyce sent a letter to his father, Jonathan Boyce, telling him that since they only have one train available to them they have a whole team waiting around with nothing to do. Archie suggests that his father should contact the railroad people about getting more trains out to the lumber camp. He also talks about a very sick horse he has at the camp. (Box 43) Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce Telegrams.Box 18: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893 and undated. Of particular interest is a letter dated December 15,1892, Archie Boyce sent to his father, Jonathan Boyce, telling him about how he received new horses at camp. Also that he requests more whips from the man that previously brought him some with the horses. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records.Box 19: This series is divided into the following years 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895 and undated. Of particular interest in 1892, Jonathan Boyce was sent a bill from the American Casualty Insurance and Security Co. for $57.87 pertaining to doctor’s bills for seven injured employees. Also in 1893, there is a newspaper clipping form the Morning Patriot discussing the new Union Lumber Company of Jackson and that they had purchased the Plummer Lumber Mill. Also included are: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence. Box 20: This series is divided into the following years 1893 and 1894, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence; Boyce Postal Telegraph-Cable Co. – Of particular interest in 1894 Jonathan Boyce sold his schooner “Levi.” Box 21: This series is divided into the following years 1874, 1877, 1878, 1879 and undated, and includes: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts. Boyce Legal Correspondence – In 1878 Jonathan Boyce bought land in Roscommon County from a Robert D. Robinson for $500.00. Flint and Pere Marquette Railroad Company – In 1874 Jonathan Boyce was forced to give up land to the railroad company due to land grants given by the state of Michigan to aid Box 22: This series is divided into the following years 1881, 1882 and undated. Of particular interest in 1882 Jonathan Boyce bought parcels of land in Denton Township, Roscommon County, for $40,000. Boyce Auditor General’s Report – List of all the tracts of land owned by Jonathan Boyce in Roscommon County and the amount he paid in taxes on those properties in 1881.Also included are: Boyce Personal Correspondence; Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Legal Correspondence.Jackson, Lansing and Saginaw Railroad Company – In 1882 Jonathan Boyce bought land from Jackson, Lansing and Saginaw Railroad Company for $28,056. Box 23: This series is divided into the following years 1890, 1891, 1892 and 1893. Boyce Grove Farm – In 1890 Jonathan Boyce bought Grove Farm in Tivethall, St. Margret in Norfolk, England from John Aldous. Boyce Insurance on Grove Farm – In December 1891 Jonathan Boyce paid 2,000 pounds to The Liverpool, London and Globe Insurance Co. for Grove Farm he bought the previous year. The insurance covered property including the farmhouse, dairy, scullery, a range of poultry houses, stable, hay barn, range of bullock sheds, range of wagon and cart barns, turnip house, piggeries, and five tenant cottages. Boyce shipping Records – Jonathan Boyce’s schooner “Levi Grant” was in a collision with a tug “Tom Brown”, which had one large dump scow in tow. The collision caused broken planks, rails, anchor stocks and stanchion besides other damages. Boyce Legal Correspondence – Jonathan Boyce bought parcels of land in Roscommon County from Matthew Wilson for $15,000 in May 1892. Box 24: This series is divided into the following years 1893 and undated. Boyce American Casualty Insurance and Security Company- In 1893 Jonathan Boyce took out a $50,000 insurance policy with American Casualty Insurance and Security Company. Also in October of 1893 Jonathan Boyce paid John Suyder $10.20 due to injuries sustained on August 31, 1893. Also he paid Ed Tackle $5.53 for injuries sustained on September 18, 1893. These payouts were recorded on Proof of Loss insurance paper under the American Casualty Insurance and Security Company policy. Boyce Norwich Union Fire Insurance Society – In 1893 Jonathan Boyce took out a $1,500 fire insurance policy on the equipment in the schooner “Levia Grant” while it was stored in a building at Number 215 Franklin Street at Michigan City, Indiana. The policy covered equipment such as sails, cordage running gear tow and running lines, cabin furniture cooking utensils, crockery, compasses and color blocks. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Business Correspondence; Boyce Legal Correspondence. Box 25: This series is divided into the following years 1895 and 1896. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Business Correspondence; Boyce Shipping Records.Boyce Legal Correspondence – It appears that Jonathan Boyce and Geo. Boyce were having a dispute over land in Roscommon County. In October 29, 1895 the court partitioned the land between the two parties. Box 26: This series is divided into the following years 1898, 1899 and undated. Boyce Chicago Insurance Company – In 1898 Jonathan Boyce took out a $1,000 insurance policy from the Chicago Insurance Company on the schooner “Geo. J. Boyce.” The policy also covered the schooner’s hull, body, tackle, apparel, engines, steam pumps, gauges and connections, machinery, furniture, small boats, general outfit and equipment. Boyce Legal Correspondence – In 1899 Jonathan Boyce signed a contract with the Michigan Salt Association that stated that he would solely make/provide salt for the association. Also included are: Boyce Business Receipts; Boyce Business Correspondence.Box 27: This series is divided into the following years 1878-1956 and undated, and includes: Jonathan Boyce Deeds; Jonathan Boyce Check Book; Jonathan Boyce Estate Papers; Jonathan Boyce Receipts; Jonathan Boyce Tax Receipts.Box 28: This series is divided into the following years 1912-1961 and undated, and includes: J. Gordon Boyce Diary; J. Gordon Boyce, Financial Ledger; Jessie L. Boyce Valier Corporations. J. Gordon Boyce Birthday Greetings Book with the following birthdays: Mrs. J. Boyce, March 17. Chauney Todd, June 8. J. Gordon Boyce, June 29, 1906. Ruth A. Winegar, August 3. Jessie L. Boyce, October 31. Comstock Russell, December 6, 1907.Boxes 29-33 are mostly financial records, mostly cancelled checks, bills, and receipts. Box 29 has years 1890 and 1891, Box 30 has years 1892, 1894 and 1895, Box 31 has years 1896, 1897, 1898 and 1899, Box 32 has years 1891, 1892, 1893, 1894, 1895, 1896, 1897 and undated. Also included are: Boyce, I. J. Boyce Ship Trip Book; Boyce Shipping Records; Boyce, Schooner Jessie L. Boyce Ship Supplies Book. Box 33 has years 1883, 1884, 1885, 1886, 1887, 1888, 1889 and 1893.

Processing Note: The collection overall is in good physical condition. FIve very acidic or fragile items were photocopied and the originals were withdrawn from the collection. Please Note: 19 of the 78 volumes are moldy, are so indicated in the finding aid, and should be use with care by patrons. At an earlier date someone roughly organized the collection chronologically. A handwritten note suggests that the collection was donated by J. Gordon Boyce, grandson of Jonathan Boyce, with his sister, Jessie, in 1966 or later.

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