Collection,   1949-1966
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History

History of the Event:

In 1964, several professors at Central Michigan University (CMU) were denied their annual raises. Complaints about this and several other issues by CMU faculty reached Senator Edward J. Robinson, who became concerned about the situation. On April 1, 1965, Senator Robinson introduced Senate Resolution No. 88, which called for an investigation of the relationship of CMU’s faculty and administration. Following the adoption of an amendment, the resolution was adopted on April 15. The committee was appointed by the Senate on April 21 and consisted of senators Edward J. Robinson, Chair, Roger E. Craig, Guy VanderJagt, Jan VaderPloeg, and Donald S. Potter, with Committee Clerk, Sharon D. Stobar. Richard J. Abood served as the Senate General Counsel.

Ultimately, twenty-six members of CMU faculty and administration testified from May 17 through December 2, 1965. Issues of concern included: treatment of faculty; lack of faculty involvement in the academic planning of CMU; the authoritarian nature of the administration; the academic excellence of CMU; lack of research; overloaded teaching schedules; numerous grievances regarding interferences by the administration in faculty matters; parking regulations; and other matters.

After hearing testimony, reading letters, and much discussion, the Committee recommended in its final report: increased faculty participation in academic policy making at all levels of CMU; that the Board of Trustees should adopt a salary practice providing cost of living increases to all faculty and merit increases to others; reconsideration of those professors who had been denied incremental increases in salary; a review of budget procedures; better balance of student class size loads; review of retirement age of University officers; and proper provisions for handling contested grades, among other recommendations.

The final report of the Committee is cataloged separately and available in the Clarke Historical Library.